Question about Microsoft Windows 98 for PC

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Computer problem if an customer my computer is windows 2000 and windows 98. when i' m using windows 98 i cannot access or open my files that have been saved in windows 2000.what are the possible problems?

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Re: computer problem


The file system (NTFS) on Windows 2000 can't be read by Windows 98.

Posted on Dec 16, 2007

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Cannot connect to networked computer: Error - "not enough storage space to process this command"

Okay, first a bit of "techie" information. When you print you send a file to the "print spooler" on the system handling the printing. In your case, that is Workstation 2. That file can be quite large and if there are several sent at once it can take up a lot of room. Once the system finishes printing it then clears out that space on the hard drive. Second, because you also use that for a file storage it may be that a lot of files are stored on that system either permanently or temporarily. So....the answer is that you are probably temporarily running out of disk space.

The reason you IRPStackSize increase worked is that you set aside more space for that stack so the system could hand incoming data more easily ...which meant it could sometimes delay a disk write enough to avoid a printing error.

The solution is to either increase the hard drive capacity of the system or to move the printing or customer files to another system on the network.

Of course, I could be wrong about this....;>) but it's the first thing that occurred to me.

Jul 17, 2013 | Microsoft Windows 7 Professional for PC

1 Answer

I cant use Music Match jukebox on my new PC. Why?

  1. Verify that your music is in the MusicMatch Jukebox Plus folder on your hard drive. Double-click the "My Computer" icon on your desktop, or select "My Computer" from the Start menu. Open the C:\\ drive. Double-click "MusicMatch Jukebox." Review the folder to check that all of your MP3 files are inside the folder. If not, search your computer for the files and drag them to the MusicMatch folder.
  2. Turn on folder sharing to ensure the software can access your music files. Open "My Network Places" in the "My Computer" folder. Click "Properties." In the resulting window, click "File and Print Sharing." Check the box next to, "I want to be able to give others access to my files." Click "OK" and close all open windows before restarting your PC.
  3. Check that you have permission to play the specific MP3 files if you are having playback issues. Occasionally, songs purchased through the Yahoo! Music online store using MusicMatch Jukebox Plus have faulty digital rights management (DRM) protection. Burn the file to a CD and then rip the song from the CD as an MP3, which removes the DRM protection and allows the software to play it without restrictions. This is your only recourse, as the MusicMatch store no longer exists. Previously, you could have contacted MusicMatch's customer service to have the song reissued.
  4. Reinstall the MusicMatch Jukebox Plus software. Click the "Start" menu button in the lower left-hand corner of the screen and select "Settings." Open your "Control Panel" and double-click the icon named "Add/Remove Programs." Locate "MUSICMATCH" in the list of available programs and click "Uninstall."
  5. Insert the MusicMatch Jukebox Plus installation disk into your computer's disk drive and follow the on-screen instructions to install the software again. This may resolve problems involving faulty computer files and corrupt Windows Registry data.
  6. Clean any CDs you are trying to rip or record to using the MusicMatch software. Disks with unclean surfaces involving dust or fingerprints are some of the most common reasons for faulty MP3 ripping or poor audio when recording CDs. Use a specialty disk cleaning cloth or a cloth intended for cleaning similarly sensitive accessories such as prescription eyeglasses. Wipe the disk from the middle toward the edge.please rate and comment on this product just by saying how helpful it is.raise the thumb up

Dec 21, 2010 | Operating Systems

1 Answer

Hi - on log on my computer is unable to open my user account and opens a temporary account instead. It gives the message 'attempting to restore a file in the registry but the specified file is not in...

If you can access your computer with a temporary user account, you can simply replace the "hal.dll". You can find this file in all windows computers (win xp to win 7), simply copy the file from another computer save it on a flash drive and paste it in the folder C: > Windows > System 32 and paste it. The steps are as follows, open "My Computer", double click "C:" drive, again open "Windows" folder and then again open "System32" folder and paste the file there. Restart your computer and it'll work fine.

Or you can download the "hal.dll" file here. (I've uploaded it for you). Open the link and click "Download Now", wait for 20 seconds and again click "Download File Now" link (purple link).

If you need further help, let me know.

Good luck.

Thanks for using FixYa.

Aug 27, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional With...

3 Answers

I dont know what the heck is up with my computer. Previously, just yesterday in fact, I could access all my D: Drives Folder, but today, when I accidently dragged (lets name them folder a and b), Folder A...

This sounds a lot like something has taken over administrative rights to your computer, and limiting your access to your own folders. Try running Malwarebytes anti-malware to see if you have a trojan, rootkit or malware on your PC then try this program called unlocker1.8.7 to see if it will unlock the folder and give you permission to open it.

Apr 05, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

2 Answers

Icon background in Windows XP 2

It looks like a custom view for a music folder. Try right-clicking on the folder in Windows Explorer, then select the 3rd tab, "Customize", and change your folder type.

Jan 27, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional SP2

3 Answers

Windows Vista

In the start menu click network,on the bar on top click network and sharing center,scroll down and enable network discovery.

Apr 20, 2009 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

1 Answer

When playing/ripping a cd the drive stops after 1 song

Open Control Panel. If you use Classic View, select Default Programs otherwise select Programs, then Default Programs. Select 'Set program access and computer defaults.' Select 'Continue' at the UAC prompt. Click on the expansion arrows on the right hand side of the 'Custom' option. Scroll down to where it says 'Choose a default media player:' Select anything except Windows Media Player' and make sure that the 'Enable access to this program' checkbox is checked, then click OK. Click on 'Set program access and computer defaults' again. Click the 'Continue' button on the UAC prompt. Click on the expansion arrows on the 'Custom' option again. Scroll down to 'Choose a default media player:' and select Windows Media Player, again ensuring that the 'Enable access to this program' checkbox is checked. Click on OK, close all open windows, and reboot the machine. This should solve the problem.

If you still have problems, let me know and I'll look for other options.

Jan 20, 2009 | Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium with...

1 Answer

File sharing

it is possible

If you have multiple computers in your home and they are connected through a home network, you can share files among your computers. That means you no longer have to copy files to a floppy disk or USB flash drive to transfer them to another computer. Once you configure your computer to share files, you (or another user with the appropriate permissions) can, by using Windows Explorer, open them from other computers connected to the network, just like you’d open files that are stored on a single computer. You can also choose to have folders visible—but not modifiable—from other computers on the network.
To share files on your computer with other computers on a network, you need to:
Share a folder on your computer. This will make all of the files in the folder available to all the computers on your network (you can’t share individual files).
Set up user accounts on your computer for everyone who needs to connect to your shared folder. If any of the accounts are Limited User accounts (unless an account is a Computer Administrator account, it is a Limited User account), follow the steps in Set permissions for files and folders to enable them to open your files.

To access shared files that are on another computer on your network, you need to:
• Connect to the shared folder from other computers on the network. This procedure is described in Map a network drive.

Note: By default, file permissions only allow your user account and administrators on your local computer to open your files, regardless of whether a person is sitting at your keyboard or at another computer. It may help to keep these three things in mind when setting up file sharing:
• Files have user permission settings.
• Every computer has its own user database.
• Some accounts are administrator accounts and some aren’t.

Configure your computer to share files To share a folder on your computer so that files stored in the folder can be accessed from other computers on your home network
Log on to your computer as an administrator. For more information, see Access the administrator account from the Welcome screen.
Click Start, and then click My Documents.
68599-click-my-documents.gif 3.
Right-click the folder that you want to share, and then click Sharing and Security.
68599-click-sharing-and-security.gificotip.gif Tip: If you want to share your entire My Documents folder, open My Documents, and then click the Up button on the toolbar. You can then select the My Documents folder.
If you see a message that reads, As a security measure, Windows has disabled remote access to this computer, click the Network Setup Wizard link. Then follow the instructions in How to set up your computer for home networking. On the File and printer sharing page of the Network Setup Wizard, be sure to select Turn on file and printer sharing. If you do not see this message, skip this step and go to step 5.
68599-click-network-setup-wizard.gif Note: If you do not see the Network Setup Wizard link or the Share this folder on the network check box, your computer probably has Simple File Sharing disabled. This is a common change made to computers used for business. In fact, it happens automatically when a computer joins an Active Directory domain. You should follow these instructions to share a folder instead.
In the Properties dialog box, select the Share this folder on the network check box.
68599-click-share-this-folder.gif 6.
If you want to be able to edit your files from any computer on your network (instead of just being able to open them without saving any changes), select the Allow network users to change my files check box.
68599-click-allow-network-users-to-change-my-files.gif 7.
Click OK.
68599-click-ok.gif Windows Explorer will show a hand holding the folder icon, indicating that the folder is now shared.
To connect to the shared folder from another computer, follow the steps described in How to map a network drive.
Note: By default, only you and other people with an administrator account on the computer sharing the folder will be able to open your files. To limit access of specific users with an administrator account on the computer sharing the folder, read How to set permissions for files and folders.

Aug 14, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

1 Answer

File sharing between windows 2000 and XP

1) I believe that Windows XP is not setup for that by default,
you may need to install the old BETBUI service.

2) Also, if the 2000 machine has a login password installed,
it will NOT allow any other machine to browse it, without
logging in.

3) Password-less file sharing over NETBUI was available
on the consumer side of windows:

Windows 3.11 for Work groups
Windows 95, 98 and Millenium.

The professional versions of windows, built on NT
technology require a login:

Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000, Windows XP,
and now Vista.

4) The best work around is to login to the 2000 machine when
it prompts you for a password, using your regular USER ID

If the 2000 machine is not setup with a secure login,
just create a new account, ranking power user or higher.

5) Note that you only need to login over the network ONCE,
because windows XP can REMEMBER your password,
and login automatically the next time.

6) Make sure that the firewall (or A firewall) is not
blocking access to either machine, just disable the
firewalls for testing.

Similarly, if your LAN is behind a residential router, using
the router as a smart hub or switch, make sure that
the routers MAC address access blocking is disabled,
until you get everything setup and tested.

7) Finally if a PC is not visible in a work group, this does not
mean that it is not accessible. This is a Windows quirk.

You can try to access another computer by using the
default/administrative shares. These shares cannot be
disabled in XP, at least they will not stay disabled, as
they will restart during every reboot, whether you like it
or not.

This means that you can ALWAYS access all the drives
on another machine, whether you share them or not, unless
you take extreme measures in the local policies.

To access drive "E:" on a computer called "Henry" on a
machine in the same work-group,

open up windows explorer, and tyr the following into the
address line:


This should access drive E:, after some delay, and possibly
a login prompt, even though drive is is NOT marked as

Down you just love windows ?!
Security by obscurity ?!
Microsoft is getting very good at hanging massive steel doors
on paper walls.

Hope this solves your problem, or gets around it.
Please rate my answers,


Jul 05, 2008 | Microsoft Windows 2000 for PC

1 Answer

WMP 11 validation issue

Windows Media Player is a feature of the Windows operating system and cannot be removed entirely. However, depending upon which version of the Player and Windows that you are using, you might be able to roll back to the version of the Player that was previously on your computer. The procedure varies depending upon which version of the Player you are running.

If your computer is running Windows XP Service Pack 1 (SP1), Windows XP SP2, Windows 2000 SP3, or Windows 2000 SP4, you can use the Set Program and Access Defaults feature to remove links to the Player on your computer. Note that this does not remove the Windows Media Player software. To remove access to the Player, do the following: 1.
In Control Panel, double-click Add or Remove Programs.
Click the Set Program and Access Defaults button, and then choose a configuration (such as "Non-Microsoft" or "Custom").

Mar 02, 2008 | Operating Systems

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