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How can you design and build a vehicle that will have the ability to roll a length of 6 meters without the use of fuel or electrical engine?

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Looking for a cnc drill bank from a Italian group Fam co.

Posted on Sep 24, 2009

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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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I am having trouble getting the engine to run. It will crank but won't stay running.


Attempt to hold the choke in the on position. Typical of these designs the choke returns to the run position as the unit warms up. It is likely that the carburetor has become fowled by residue remaining after the gas has evaporated.

this is a common problem. The residue restricts the
critical fuel metering passages and by retaining the choke on the mixture is enriched enough to maintain engine operation.

The best corrective action is to not remove the carburetor , but to attempt to replace the fuel with fresh fuel preferably without ethonal. Second would be to add a fuel additive that has the ability to clean out the fuel system.

Attempt to run the unit and using the choke try to maintain operation.

Allow the unit to sit overnight and hope that the residue will dissolve. If the fuel metering adjustments screws are adjustable record the current setting and adjust the settings counter clockwise to enrich the fuel mix. Small adjustments 1/4 turn.

Allow the unit to run adjusting over time the mixture back to the original settings as the residue dissolves,

Disassembling the carburetor is only recommended by a professional. It is very easy to damage a good carburetor attempting to clean it.

Hope this has helped?

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Mar 26, 2016 | Electrical Supplies

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Octane Myth


What is octane? Octane cannot be seen, but it is of utmost importance when it comes to gasoline. One thing for sure, higher octane fuel costs more. Allot more! Simply put, octane is a measure of gasoline's ability to resist detonation, which you hear as pinging and knocking in your engine. The higher the octane the more the fuel can be compressed without detonating before you want it to. Detonation, ping, knock, whatever you want to call it, occurs when the air/fuel mixture ignites before the spark plug fires. The mixture ignites from compression and not from the flame of the spark plug. In other words, the higher the octane the less likely it is to ignite prematurely. The only benefit to a high octane fuel is that it allows an engine to run at a higher temperature and with a higher compression ratio without pinging. Higher octane fuel does not provide more energy, more power, better mileage, more torque, burn cleaner, clean your engine, and is not better for the environment. If the engine is pinging when using the correct octane fuel, then it may be necessary to move to the next higher octane to prevent pinging, and damage to your engine, unless there is another problem. If you are using higher octane fuel for any of these reasons, STOP, you are throwing your money away. Also, never use a lower octane fuel than is recommended by the manufacture. If the manufacture recommends 89 octane then use 89. If they recommend 87 then use 87. The key is what was the engine designed to run at to achieve optimum performance and mileage? One exception is when you are towing a heavy load with a vehicle designed to run on 87 and you experience pinging. In that case it may become necessary to switch to 89 while towing. In conclusion, race car engines are designed to run on high octane fuels due to their high compression engines. You cannot make your engine a race engine just by upping the octane. Save your hard earned money, and use exactly the octane you need.

on Jun 19, 2010 | Honda Accord Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a Schumacher 6/2 amp dual charger, SE-82-6. I took off the clamps. Now don't know which wire is positive. One has a white line on it.


Get a volt meter and hook up the test probes to the cable ends and turn the meter on, the meter will say 12 or -12 if it says 12 then you have the red and black from the meter connected to the red and black on the charger in the right manner, if it says -12 then you have them reversed. Take the cable clamps and put them back on.

Mar 01, 2016 | Schumacher SE82-6 Manual Charger...

1 Answer

How fix that problem


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Nitrous Oxide NO is created when an engine's combustion chamber temperature reaches over 2500F. 1. Lean Fuel Mixture - Lean fuel mixtures cause high NOx. A lean fuel mixture exists when less fuel then required is delivered to the combustion chambers or when more air then necessary is added to the fuel. In either case the lack of gasoline needed to cool the combustion chambers down is not present. Combustion temperatures increase causing high nitrous oxide emissions. A lean fuel condition may be due to a vacuum leak/s and/or defective fuel control components, such as the Air Flow Meter, Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor, and O2 sensors.
2. Defective EGR System - The Exhaust Gas Recirculation system is designed to reduce NO. The EGR system consists of an EGR valve, EGR pressure sensor, vacuum hoses, and one or more vacuum switching valves or solenoids. newer vehicles may use an electronically controlled EGR valves, which do not require vacuum lines or switching solenoids.
The EGR system's job is to re-route a small amount of exhaust gas back into the intake manifold to help reduce combustion chamber temperatures. As mentioned above NOx is created when combustion chamber temperatures reach above 2500F.
By recirculating exhaust gas back into the intake, a small amount of the air/fuel mixture is replaced with inert gas, reducing combustion temperatures.
3. Defective Catalytic Converter Some vehicles operate without EGR valves. Non-EGR equipped vehicles rely heavily on the Catalytic Converter to assist in the reduction of NO. These vehicles have tendencies to develop CAT problems sooner then those which are equipped. If you own a non-EGR equipped vehicle, and have failed the emissions test for high NOx, pay close attention to the Catalytic Converter.
4. High Engine Mileage - Over an engine's lifetime, carbon build-up develops in the engine's combustion chambers. The more miles on your engine, the more carbon build-up on the pistons, cylinder heads and valves. Carbon build-up decreases the available space for the air/fuel mixture to combust, and causes higher cylinder compression. High compression results in high temperatures and high NOx. Keep in mind this problem is usually seen in vehicles with over 150,000 miles which have been poorly maintained. The solution to this problem is called De-Carbonizing. It will remove a good amount of carbon out of an engine. This will increase combustion space, lower compression and lower NOx.
5. Engine Overheating - Inadequate engine cooling can will high NOx. If your vehicle's cooling system is not working efficiently, high NOx will be created. Remember high NOx nitrous oxide is created when an engine's combustion chamber temperatures reach over 2500F. You will want to make sure your vehicle's cooling system is working properly, and your vehicle's temperature gauge is always indicating normal.

Carbon Monoxide is a by-product of incomplete combustion. Carbon Monoxide exceeding maximum limits, can be due to a number of emission failures ranging from inadequate air intake to defective engine computer sensors. This condition is referred to as a "Rich Fuel Conditon".
1. Dirty Air Filter - The number one overlooked emissions component, yes, "emissions" component is the engine air filter. A dirty air filter will absolutely restrict air flow, thus disturbing the proper 14.7:1 air/fuel ratio required for optimum fuel combustion.
2. Faulty Oxygen Sensor The Oxygen Sensor is responsibly for delivering information to the ECU or ECM relating to the oxygen content in the exhaust stream after it has left the combustion chambers.
The engine control computer will determine how much fuel to inject into the combustion chambers based on this data. The more oxygen in the stream, the more fuel the computer will deliver, and visa-versa. A defective O2 sensor will cause increased carbon monoxide emissions.
3. Defective Manifold Absolute Pressure - The MAP sensor determines the level of vacuum created during an engine's intake stroke, and sends this information to the ECU. During low vacuum the MAP sensor assumes the engine's throttle is in some degree open, meaning you've stepped on the pedal. It relays this information to the ECU. The ECU, in turn, sends commands to the fuel injectors, or carburetor, to increase fuel delivery.
A defective MAP sensor will not report the correct information to the ECU, thus disturbing air/fuel ratio. Usually when the ECU senses a defective MAP sensor it will learn to ignore its data, and rely on preset values, and other sensors such as the Throttle Position Sensor, and Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor; Fuel delivery will not be as accurate and high CO may result.
4.Defective Throttle Position Sensor - Obviously a very important emissions sensor; the TPS relays information regarding the position of the air intake system's throttle plate. The throttle plate, located after the engine air filter and before the intake manifold controls the amount of air entering the combustion chambers. It is usually manipulated by the gas pedal via a cable. On late model vehicles the throttle plate may be controlled electronically. A defective throttle position sensor will confuse the ECU into thinking the vehicle's operator is demanding more or less fuel, when neither is really neccessary. Most often a faulty TPS will cause high CO, as an engine's ECU always prefers to send more fuel rather then less, in an effort to avoid a lean fuel mixture and subsequently higher engine temperatures.5. Defective Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor - Low engine temperature requires more fuel. When the ECU is unable to determine what the engine's accurate temperature is, it will not adjust fuel delivery properly; resulting in high CO. As explained above, the Engine Control Computer prefers to send more fuel rather then less to avoid a lean fuel mixture.

Hydrocarbon HC. Hydrocarbons are basically raw fuel, otherwise known as Gasoline. High Hydrocarbon (HC) emissions are almost always a sign of poor fuel ignition. However, it's not always that the engine's ignition system is responsible for high Hydrocarbon emissions.1. Improper Ignition Timing - Engine ignition timing is measured in degrees before or after Top Dead Center. Example of an ignition timing failure would be in the case where an engine's ignition timing is required to be set at 10 degrees Before Top Dead Center and instead is set to 15 degrees BTDC. This fault will not only cause a smog check "functional failure", but will increase Hyrdocarbon (HC) emissions as well. California allows 3 degrees +/- off of the manufacturer's required setting. Newer vehicle's may not have a distributor, and and no timing adjustment will be needed. On these engines timing is electronically controlled by the ECU.
2. Defective Ignition Components Your vehicle's ignition system consists of the ignition coil/s, distributor, distributor cap, distributor rotor, ignition wires, and spark plugs. If any of these components are defective the engine will produce high hydrocarbons. A common reason ignition components perform poorly is due to carbon build-up. High ignition voltage traveling through the air pockets within these components form carbon. Carbon acts as an insulator between paths of electricity, decreasing the energy required at the spark plug to ignite the air/fuel in the combustion chambers properly.
3. Lean Fuel Mixture - Any condition which will cause unmetered air to enter the intake manifold, and ultimately the combustion chambers, will cause high hydrocarbons (HC). This condition is called a lean miss-fire. Such faults as vacuum leaks and gasket leaks will cause lean fuel/air mixtures. Broken, disconnected or misrouted vacuum hoses will do the same. It is also important to note that many engine components rely on engine vacuum for proper operation. If any of these components are defective, externally or internally, they may cause large vacuum leaks as well.
4. Defective Catalytic Converter - A defective catalytic converter may be responsible for high HC, CO, and NOx emissions. The Catalytic Converter, commonly referred to as the CAT is a component designed to continue the combustion process within itself and emit a more thoroughly burned and less harmful emissions containing exhaust. The most accurate way to find out if your vehicle's CAT is working efficiently is by using an exhaust gas analyzer. Unfortunately this tool is fairly expensive.
Some obvious symptoms of a bad CAT could be any of the following:
a. Major loss of power over 15-25 mph. This may be an indication that the catalytic converter is plugged up and restricting exhaust flow.
b. Strong sulfer or rotten egg smell emitting from the exhaust on an otherwise good running vehicle. This may be an indication that the Catalytic Converter isn't burning fuel completely, instead storing it, then releasing it as hydrogen sulfide.
c. Loud rattle being heard from inside the CAT. This may indicate a broken Catalytic Converter substrate. You may want to insure this sound is not due to loose exhaust components.
5. Defective Air Injection Components - Faulty smog pump and related emissions system components will cause high HC. The air injection system is designed to introduce additional oxygen, after the metering system, to the engine exhaust as it exits the exhaust manifold, or directly before it enters the Catalytic Converter; thus burning whatever remaining fuel (HC) in the exhaust completely.
6. Low Cylinder Compression - This fault is one of the less common high HC causing problems. Reasons an engine may have low or no compression in one or more of its cylinders may include things such as burned intake or exhaust valve/s, defective valve guides and/or seals, defective piston rings, and burned head gasket/s. A wet/dry cylinder compression test will diagnose this fault. More then often if such a problem exists it will be very apparent. You should notice rough idle.

Feb 19, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2006 ninja250 not firing


Replace the fuel and clean the carbs/injectors. Basically give it a very good service. After 6 years of sitting unused, the mating faces of the engine internals and the electrical contacts will all be seized or corroded. When you lay a vehicle up for any length of time it needs to have certain things done to allow it to be re-commissioned.

Oct 02, 2012 | 2008 kawasaki Ninja 250R

1 Answer

I always have problem in starting my ford focus ghia 1.8 TDCI from cold. if its standing for 6-7 hours, it takes ages to start again, most of the time I need jump leads, though battery is fine.


There are a number of variables within the smaller Ford vehicles, due to their smaller alternators and loads. So, here are a few questions which may help to narrow down the culprit.
Generally, this involves the fuel/air intake or electrical supply to the cylinders.
While trying to start, does the engine backfire a fair amount? If so, the issue is most likely electrical, and this can be caused by a variety of things. Gas-powered engines tend to backfire when the fuel/air mixture isn't ignited by the spark plug before the valve(s) open for exhaust (but not always).
Does the engine sound like it's trying to start, like firing intermittently, but laboring without backfiring until the battery is dead? ...and, are there any other sounds, like clicking or "clunking" sounds prior to the battery going dead?
Electrical:
1) If the vehicle is fairly new, understand the limitations of the electrical system, especially if you added any after-market items (big stereo, large bass box, etc.), which may require a heavy electrical current to power. It could be as simple as having some sort of power disconnect to these devices, so that all of your battery power can be directed to the spark plugs, and perhaps upgrading to a higher output alternator and battery with more CCA capacity.
2) If the vehicle is older, or has high mileage, it could be the electrical distribution to the spark plugs (any number of places this can happen, between the battery, the regulator, distributor/electronic ignition module, etc.). Also, check your battery terminals, because often the corrosion limits current from the battery posts to the electrical system (check the cables, too, where that blue/green corrosion can build up), which can be cleaned (after disconnecting) with a mixture of baking soda and water to neutralize it, or replace the battery cables altogether.
Fuel / Air Intake Mixture:
1) If an older vehicle, check the fuel filter and/or fuel pump, to make sure there isn't something going on to limit the flow of fuel. Likewise for the air intake filter. Sometimes, the automatic adjustment within the vehicle for cold starting isn't working properly, which can cause problems like you're stating, so that needs to be adjusted and/or replaced.
These would be the easier things to check first, and of course a number of other elements could be at play, such as cylinder compression (bad rings), spark plug build-up (usually from misfiring, requiring spark plug cleaning or replacement), major fuel/air intake or electrical system malfunction.
Unfortunately, without more specifics, it's difficult to diagnose accurately. However, I hope this gives you a few areas to look into, which may provide an answer and solution for you.
Good luck!

Feb 13, 2012 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

1996 4.3 vortec S10. Cranks wont start when engine/ outside temp is cold. Have used starting fluid,will start and run rest of day. Fuel pmp is cycling relay is working,needed a tune up I replaced all...


The plenum shouldn't be damp with gas. Is it a throttle body fuel injection system?

Could be a leaky injector.

Fuel Meter Body & Fuel Injectors (4.3L Engine) Removal & Installation 1995-2002 Models (RPO L35) To Remove:
4.3L (RPO L35) Fuel meter body assembly gm_trk_sil15_02-04_43_fuel_metr_body_assy.gif

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Cautions and Warnings in the beginning of this section
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Upper intake manifold (See: Upper Intake Manifold)
    • Fuel meter body
    • Injector retainer lock nuts (J) and retainer (K)
    NOTE: Use care in removing the fuel injectors to prevent damage to the electrical connector terminals. The fuel injector is serviced as a complete assembly only. Also since the injectors are electrical compartments, these injectors should not be immersed in any type of liquid solvent or cleaner as damage may occur. Fuel injector cleaning is not recommended.
  3. While pulling the poppet nozzle tube downward, push with a small tip punch down between the injector terminals until the injector is removed
To Install:
4.3L (RPO L35) Fuel meter body assembly gm_trk_sil15_02-04_43_fuel_metr_body_assy.gif

Note: When ordering new fuel injectors, be sure to order the correct injector for the application being serviced.
  1. Lubricate the new injector O-ring seals with clean engine oil.
  2. Install or connect the following:
    • Fuel injector (L) into the fuel meter body injector socket
    • Retainer (K) and injector retainer lock nuts (J) and tighten the nuts
      1. Torque to: 27 inch lbs. (3 Nm)
    • Fuel meter body
    • Upper intake manifold (See: Upper Intake Manifold)
  3. Test drive the vehicle to confirm the repairs.
1993-2005 Models (RPO LU3) To Remove:
4.3L (RPO LU3) Fuel meter body assembly gm_trk_sil15_02-04_43_rpolu3_fuel_metr_body_assy.gif

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Cautions and Warnings in the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Upper intake manifold (See: Upper Intake Manifold)
    • Fuel meter body
    • Injector retainer lock nuts (J) and retainer (K)
    NOTE: Use care in removing the fuel injectors to prevent damage to the electrical connector terminals. The fuel injector is serviced as a complete assembly only. Also since the injectors are electrical compartments, these injectors should not be immersed in any type of liquid solvent or cleaner as damage may occur. Fuel injector cleaning is not recommended.
  3. While pulling the fuel injector downward, push with a small tip punch down between the injector terminals until the injector is removed
To Install:
Note: When ordering new fuel injectors, be sure to order the correct injector for the application being serviced.
  1. Lubricate the NEW injector O-ring seals with clean engine oil
  2. Install or connect the following:
    • Fuel injector (L) into the fuel meter body injector socket
    • Retainer (K) and the injector retainer lock nuts (J) and tighten the nuts
      1. Torque to: 27 inch lbs. (3 Nm)
    • Fuel meter body
    • Upper intake manifold (See: Upper Intake Manifold)
  3. Test drive the vehicle to confirm the repairs

Jan 29, 2011 | 1996 Chevrolet S-10 Pickup

4 Answers

I have a 2001 Chevrolet Suburban will not start I turn the key it sounds like it is going to start but it does not.


can you hear the fuel pump running in the gas tank when you first turn the key to the run position?

Aug 08, 2009 | 2003 Chevrolet Suburban 1500

1 Answer

Renault megan scenic dti diognostic fault codes


whats else do you expect ,snap on code reader your having a laugh .YOU HONESTLY EXPECT TO READ A RENAULT ???????????????WITH ENCRYPTED SOFTWARE .sounds like an ECU problem but it could be something simple on the fuel injection system but without hearing the noise to know if its air in pump or an electrical buzz .check fuel IN line for ingression of air first ,also check for return in case its blocked causing the pressure to build up to high .call a scrapyard then report vehicle stolen and make a claim .this is a renault remember its designed to be dealer only repairs not weekend mechanics

Oct 27, 2008 | 2000 Renault 181

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