Question about Bushnell SkyTour 78-9960 (700 x 60mm) Telescope

1 Answer

Can't see Can't view through scope

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points


    An expert that got 20 achievements.


    An expert that got 10 achievements.


    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Master
  • 3,185 Answers
Re: can't see

Take the scope outside during the day time. Put the diagonal into the back of the scope, and then put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the diagonal. DO NOT US the 2 x barlow if you have one. Practice focusing on a distant object-- the moon should be your first target at night because it is large and easy to find.

Objects in the night sky are dim and tiny. Your scope must be pointed directly at them or you will not see anything.

Posted on Aug 04, 2011

Add Your Answer

0 characters

Uploading: 0%


Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add


3 Points

Related Questions:

1 Answer

How do I sight the telescope

The "finder-scope" as they are called can be lined up by putting a low-power eyepiece in the scope, and moving the scope (on its mount) to view a distant object such as a streetlight. An EP which gives you about the same magnification as the finder-scope is a good choice. They are mostly about x8 power.

Centre the object in the eyepiece view and then adjust the finder-scope until the object is centred in that view as well.

Repeat this with a higher power EP, then move the scope onto a bright star, and use the highest magnification EP you have to finally do the last tiny adjustment to the finder-scope.

Nov 24, 2012 | Telescopes

1 Answer

No image through lenses

1. During the daylight point the telescope towards an object (water tower, building ) something about 1/2 mile away.
2. Locate the object in your finder.
3. Use the 12.5mm lens (50x) and look through the telescope. Do not use the erect prism
4. Align the finder to what you see in the scope.
5. You can use the 4mm to fine adjust the finder.
6. On a good, clear night.Leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium ( about a hour) Point the finder towards the moon
7. Use the 12.5mm and then focus on the moon.

Note: This is NOT a quality scope. Avoid any scope with .965 eyepieces and silly magnifications! Max power on this scope on a PERFECT night is 200x and Huygens (H12.5) eyepieces give very narrow and poor viewing. Do not use the 3x barlow or the erecting prism. the erecting prism is for terrestrial viewing only and the barlow, although it increases the eyepiece by 3x, will also narrow the view.
Good Luck!

Dec 05, 2011 | Rokinon 62550 Telescope

1 Answer

I have a meade 40AZ-P telescope How do you set it up to view objects. It shows nothing?

This is really not suitable for viewing objects in the night sky -- except for the moon possibly. It is only 40mm ---- a pair of 10x50mm binoculars has more like gathering power than this small refractor scope.

Just put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the diagonal at the rear of the scope (the focuser) take the scope outside during the day time and practice focusing on a distant object. The moon should be your first target at night. Again this scope is really not suitable for viewing the night sky.

Aug 13, 2011 | Meade EU-40 AZ-P Telescope

1 Answer


The eyepiece size (diameter) is the standard 1.25 in.
Erecting eyepiece adapters can be used with this scope.
maximum magnification is 250x therefore highest eyepiece would be 3.6mm
most useful magnification of any scope is 150x (900/150= 6mm eyepiece
Eyepieces provided with scope (Huygens type) have a narrow field of view and are relatively poor for astronomy but should be fine for terrestrial viewing

Mar 11, 2011 | Tasco Luminova 40114675 (675 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

Just had a konusmotor 500 telescope and have built it to the instructions, but nothing on how to use. only a beginner but how do you increase the size of the object you are looking at,eg the moon looks the...

Are you viewing the moon through the small finder scope on top of the main tube? That is only used for aiming the scope, and has very little magnification. The moon should fill the field of view on even the lowest magnification on the main scope.

A reflector type scope has the eyepiece mount on the side of the main tube, near the top end, pointing into the side of the scope. This mount should have an eyepiece placed in it- use the one with the biggest number to start with (that will have the least magnification). Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope. You look into the side of the tube with this type of scope, not along it.

New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. This scope has a motor to track the scope and keep objects in view, but you will have to get the scope set up for that for it to work correctly. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece to start. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 22, 2011 | Konusmotor 500 (230 x 114mm) Telescope

1 Answer

I can't see anything out of the large scope

Use the 20mm to view an object (building, tree etc.) far away during the daytime. Align the finderscope to the object.
To view the moon, leave the scope out to equalize the temperature for at least 1/2 hour. Use the 20mm and no barlow. Point the scope towards the moon by sighting along the barrel of the scope, then use the finder to zero in on the moon. You may then switch to the 4mm eyepiece. for a more magnified view of the moon. You will have to keep moving the telescope because of the earth's rotation. The higher the magnification, the more you will have to adjust the scope. Because of the cheap finderscope, finding the planets will be difficult. Best to always sight down the length of the scope to get you close. The planets will be small and indistinct.
This is not a astronomical telescope! May be used for views of the moon but the cheap mount is not suitable for other planets. Max power would be 225x NOT 420x as advertised. The erecting prism is for terrestrial use only.
Nothing discourages an amateur astronomer more than a toy store telescope. My advise would be to use this scope for nature watching and go buy a good telescope (Meade, Celestron, Orion etc.). Even Those 60mm refractors are superior to this! A descent scope would cost a minimum of $200

Nov 03, 2010 | Bushnell Deep Space 78-9512 (120 x 60mm)...

1 Answer

Having a clear sky last night i took my new scope out and started to view the night sky, but focusing on a star ! i found that when viewing it at magnification a could clearly see the the area infront of...

Stars are ALWAYS pinpoints of light when the scope is focused no matter how much magnification is applied.

You are NOT focused properly -- when you are you cannot see the secondary mirror or the "spider" bracket that holds the mirror.

You will NEVER see a star as a disk, only as a pinpoint light. If you are seeing what looks like a donut with a dark center you are not focused.

May 07, 2010 | Celestron PowerSeeker 114 EQ Telescope

1 Answer

Bought a Geovision Precision Optical Omega Reflector telescope with a manual from a garage sale, please help locate the instruction manual, or tell me how to get the view right side up.

The view through an astronomical telescope is always upside down. When your looking at stars and planets, it makes no difference. If you want terrestrial view, get spotting scope - that's not what reflectors are for. If you still insiste on view right side up, you'll have to buy and inverting eyepiece or adapter and probably spend more than you paid for the scope.

Jul 20, 2009 | Telescopes

2 Answers

Hi i have an optus telescope when i find a star in my view find or the spacestation orbitating the earth i find it in my view find and when i look through the lens on the scope i see notting and i have...

Your finder is not aligned with your telescope. During the day time focus on a distant small object with the telescope-- then without moving the telescope adjust the crosshairs in the finder to match the telescope.

Dec 27, 2008 | Telescopes

1 Answer

What lens do i insert into scope to view the moon

The moon is big so use the 25mm. The Barlow will have a multiplication marking on it 2x 3x etc. A 2x Barlow lens will effectively double the power of the eyepiece you are using. Do not use the erecting eyepiece for anything other than land viewing. Erecting eyepieces generally reduce the amount of light reaching your eye and thus reduce brightness of the faint objects in the sky.
So basically just place the 25 mm lens in the focuser and point the scope at the moon and you will be amazed at what you can see and how bright it is.

Dec 30, 2007 | Tasco 350x50mm Refractor Novice Telescopes

Not finding what you are looking for?
Bushnell SkyTour 78-9960 (700 x 60mm) Telescope Logo

Related Topics:

129 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Bushnell Telescopes Experts

Joe Lalumia aka...
Joe Lalumia aka...

Level 3 Expert

3185 Answers


Level 3 Expert

2963 Answers

Vernon Taylor

Level 3 Expert

1947 Answers

Are you a Bushnell Telescope Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides