Question about Fuji FinePix S2000hd Digital Camera

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Manual light & exposure settings

We need to photograph our artwork at high res, in natural light-(using the flash glares off the paint surface)we need advice on the custom settings for light exposure etc using this camera.

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If you are using flash lights on the art work, please follow the following steps

  1. turn off your flash in cam since it bypasses the external flash and makes the picture look different.
  2. turn your light settings to either automatic or "flash light or arc light".but do not set them to incandescent light!!!
  3. turn your macro to on status if you are going to take a close up shots, but please note that close up shots work great in natural sunlight than at flash lights...

Posted on Sep 13, 2009

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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How do I print artwork getting all the colors to render accurately, so that it looks like the original painting.


Unfortunately you screen (computer or other ) isn't calibrated.
there is software mostly pro use this, but take a picture of a flat grey placard.
using your photo program to check the gamma settings and modify them until the grey on screen matches placard ( hold placard next to monitor). Then print out grey image.
important write down the gamma settings and when you put something to print check to see if these are close.

Sep 26, 2016 | HP Designjet Z6100 InkJet Printer

1 Answer

Can you offer suggestions for positioning furnishings to optimize lighting potential?


In general it's ideal to have natural light sources in front of or adjacent to work surfaces and computer screens to avoid glare. This also optimizes views to the outside. If exposures have varying brightness during the day, you can use solar shades to soften and cut down on heat without compromising the light source and view.
To know more please contact us: http://www.sportzlighting.com.au

Feb 20, 2016 | Cameras

1 Answer

PICTURES ARE BLACK


6 Ways To Fix Too Bright and Too Dark Photos

Recompose The Photo This is probably the simplest solution. When taking a photo of a scene with very bright and very dark parts, move your camera to eliminate one of the extremes. In the case of the band, I would have either closed the curtains for the shot, or recomposed completely and photographed from the window looking at the band, and the crowd behind.
Use Exposure Lock If you can't recompose the photograph, instead tell the camera what part of the image you would like to see. The rest of the photo will be either over or under exposed (too bright or too dark) but at least you will see your subject. You can dothis by placing the center of the image at your subject; half depressing the shutter to lock the focus and exposure; move the camera to re-compose the image; and fully depressing the shutter.
In the band image, the camera chose to correctly expose the scene outside, but even if the band member had been correctly exposed, the window would have ended up being over exposed and you would just have seen white.
Some cameras have an option called 'spot metering' to set the part of the image you'd like to be correctly exposed. If your camera has this setting, enable it before using the technique above.
Use Fill In Flash If your scene has a sunny background, but your subject is in the shade (or has a hat on), turn on the flash (as I explained way back in tip number 9 - Using Flash During The Day). I know it seems wrong but it really does work! By using the flash, your subject will look as bright as the background. This would have worked well for the child shot above.
High Dynamic Range Imaging This technique is not for the faintof hearted. It requires a subject that does not move; a good camera with the capability to set the exposure and output RAW images. A tripod and image editing software like Photoshop CS3 are also needed.
High Dynamic Range Imaging (or HDR for short) is a technique for placing both very dark and very light areas in the same photo. It requires you to take a number of photographs of thesame scene - each with a different exposure. First take the shot using the camera's recommended settings. Then, in manual mode and keeping the aperture at the same value as the first shot, take a sequence of shots - each shot having a different shutter speed (above and below the original). You'll have 5-9 shots of the same scene all in different exposures.
hdrunder.jpghdrmean.jpghdrover.jpg
Merging the three images to the left creates the HDR image below. Thanks to Photomatix for the images.
hdrmerged.jpgNow import these into your favorite paint program. I use Photoshop, but you can as easily use a cheaper program designed specifically for HDR photos like Photomatix. Follow the HDR directions and the paint program will merge these images into one great looking shot!
Use a Filter If your scene is of a brightsky and a dark ground (for instance at sunset, or on a cloudy day), you can use a graduated neutral density filter. This filter cuts out someof the light from one part of the photo (the sky). This will correctly expose the ground and the sky without needing to use HDR. These filterscan be complex to setup, so I don't usually recommend them for beginners.
Fix The Original Photo in an Image Editing Program twobright2.jpgFinally, if you can't take another shot at the same location, you can fix the original image by changing the levels using a paint program. This works best when your subject is darker than the rest of the photo (because cameras lose detail in over-bright areas). I've brightened the band member in the top image using this technique and while it looks okay in thissmall shot, this technique can tend to amplify any noise in the image. The darker the subject, the harder time you will have fixing the image.
I discuss exactly how to use this technique in lesson 2 of my free Image Editing Secrets course. I have a tutorial for Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, Paint Shop Pro and the free Google Picassa.
- See more at: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/140/6-ways-to-fix-too-bright-and-too-dark-photos/#sthash.58eENOTt.dpuf

Jul 09, 2014 | Nikon D3000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I have a panasonic, Lumix,DMC-FZ50. I like to photograph indoor games, I use a tripod and they still come out blurrry or out of focus.using automatic. I tried Manual but it is very dark.I would like to get...


Unfortunately tripod will not help you with freezing movement. You need to use higher ISO setting or flash light. I know they degrade image quality (each in its own way) but I can give you a small tip how to use flash. Reflected light is softer and has more natural look on pictures. Try to use a small mirror to direct your flash light to a ceiling or wall. Also read about exposure correction in your camera in user manual (as pictures taking this way might be a bit dark).

May 06, 2011 | Panasonic Cameras

1 Answer

I would like to photograph people and animals in snow


Using the camera in program mode with auto bracketing turned on should give you reasonable results. Winter light is “cooler” in nature and the bright reflections from snow and ice tend to make the final image too “bright."

Bracketing exposures help when photographing outdoors in the snow.

You can use flash as well. Remember to keep a spare battery for the camera, and keep it warm if you plan on being in the cold very long.

Dec 12, 2009 | Canon EOS-5D Digital Camera

1 Answer

My Sony Camera screen when i turn it on is white & has a pink line going diagonally through the screen


A multicolor vertical line may display on the camera LCD screen if there is glare on the subject being photographed. Avoid photographing very shiny surfaces that reflect excessive amount of light into the camera lens. Follow the procedure below to resolve this issue:
  1. Record the video or click the still pictures in a different lighting environment.
  2. On the camera, move the FOCUS AUTO/MANUAL switch to AUTO .
  3. Set the PLAY/STILL/MOVIE selector to MOVIE or STILL .
  4. Press the WHITE BALANCE button until the white balance is set to AUTO (no indicator).
  5. Record the video to new media.
  6. NOTE: If the issue is still unresolved after completing all of the troubleshooting steps, service may be required.

Aug 13, 2009 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W70 Digital Camera

1 Answer

When taking pics of paintings or sculptures,have flashback glare


The glare is from the flash and/or direct source of light behind you or from the reflected angle. The only way to get a super detailed, glare free picture from a 90 degree angle of the surface is with no flash and all sources of light being soft, really bright, and /or indirect. Have you seen the large white inverted umbrella things on movie sets and such? That is what you need. Another option available, which I use on my ebay pics is to take it outside in the sun and take the pic from a slight angle. This gets the big fiery ball off the item and your shadow does not interfere. Cut yourself some slack because the pro quality pics of artwork are done in a professional photography setting like a studio or with lots of on site equipment.

Aug 05, 2009 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ7 Digital Camera

14 Answers

When it is sunny day try to take pictires with fuji camera z100fd my face reflects on screentherefore i cant take picture i have a hood and antiglare film ao screen but makes no difference


Hi and welcome to FixYa,

To my understanding of your posted problem, it would appear that there is really nothing that could be done. It appears to be a design issue but not necessarily a limitation. You have not posted that pictures taken are affected by the reflection, hence it is more of a user friendliness question. If possible, use it like a conventional camera rather than sighting through the the LCD screen. A possible solution is to increase the backlight but that would require extensive modifications which would not make it economically reasonable nor technically easy.

If you would factor in the modification cost, downtime and the efforts to effect the desired results, you may want to re-evaluate your options and consider seeking a suitable replacement camera.

Good luck and thank you for using FixYa.

Feb 13, 2009 | Cameras

1 Answer

Nikon d50


the flashing means that the exposure is not correct for that area. if that area was the subject, then you might want to adjust the settings to reduce sensitivity in order to view that area correctly. if you spot meter the 'true subject' in the frame, there will often be areas outside that subject that are either brighter or more dimly lit. but exposure will be right for the subject. it can't all be correctly exposed if there is much variation in lighting. fill flashes will provide more light to the subject, thus resulting in a reduction in sensitivity of the resulting settings. (shorter exposure time or smaller aperture or a combination of both) and that will let the brighter areas move closer to 'not washing out' or being over exposed as some people refer to it. in either approach, its not a defect or problem unless it bothers you. the flashing just lets you know that you can modify settings if it matters that the photograph has high levels of contrast beyond what you may want. sometimes the subject is not in the center, and thus not metered for. but the framing is set to include something off to the side. you can reset exposure by adjusting exposure compensation so that while you are reading a darker area than that of the subject, you don't want the camera to use that area for light settings necessarily.
recap: exposure control via exposure compensation or fill flash
mark

Dec 22, 2007 | Nikon D50 Digital Camera

1 Answer

SB800 under exposure


Hi Stew,

Do the following:

ISO: 400
Shooting Mode: RAW or high JPEG
White Balance: Flash
Camera Mode: M
Camera Shutter: 30 or lower
Lens Aperture: 2.8
Flash Mode: A at 2.8
Flash: Wait until flash fully charged

Now, it's magic!
Send me some money for this tips when you make more money and produces great exposures:-)
Now, you're the top photographer in the town.

You can set ISO to 800 if you are not printing bigger than 8 X10.

Hope above are helpful to you and all photographers.

Alexander
atdlee@netzero.com

Nov 22, 2007 | Nikon Speedlight SB-800 TTL Flash

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