Question about Culligan Sediment Water Filter Heavy Duty

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I want to dig a pit for the backwash off my iron filter. How deep, big around, how many levels of crush how many diffrnt sizes of crush

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Great question! More people should do this! The dry well and all plumbing leading to it must be below the frost line for your area. Mine is 48". It helps to have an open vent at the point of discharge out side the home in case it may back up for any reason. You will need to size the drywell according to the discharge of your softener. A 30k softener will have about 80 gallons of discharge. Here is a great website for drywell design and capacity.
http://www.easydigging.com/Drainage/drywell_soakaway.html
I installed a drywell for softener, iron filter and sump pump discharge and it has worked great for 12 years now.
Good luck with your project,
RJ

Posted on May 15, 2011

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3 Answers

At what pressure should you backwash a sand filter


The back pressure at which it's time to backwash a sand filter is about 6-8 psi above the baseline pressure of a clean filter. Just after following the procedure to backwash and rinse your filter, check the sand filter's back pressure at the time you return the pump and filter system back into filter mode. This is the baseline pressure of your clean filter. As the filter gathers particulates from the pool water, the back pressure will rise over time, as indicated on your pressure gauge. Once the pressure reaches 6-8 psi above the baseline, it's time to backwash.

Some advice: Don't assume the baseline pressure will remain the same for your sand filter. The baseline pressure will change over time and when the sand media is replaced. Typicallly baseline pressure will go up slightly over a season due to captured particles that are difficult to backwash out. Use of a filter cleaner will help remove these captured particles.

More advice: Even with the use of filter cleaners and proper backwashing, sand media will not last forever. The constant water flow and movement of particles in the sand over time shears the surface of each little sand grain. Like a river flowing over rocks, over time each sand grain surface is smoothed, and thus its effectiveness for capturing small particles is reduced with ongoing use. A typical rule of thumb is to replace the sand media +/- 5 years. Some pool owners do it more often, some less. It depends on how long your pool season is each year and how much debris the filter much extract from the pool water.

Jul 16, 2014 | Hayward SAND FILTER, PRO SERIES

1 Answer

Is there maintainence for a nuetralizer tank


For a pH of 6.0 to 6.9 a type of naturally occurring calcium carbonate media called Calcite is used to neutralize the pH. For water with a pH of less than 6.0, magnesium oxide is blended with Calcite to bring the pH to 7.0 or above. The Calcite or the blend of media is put in either an up-flow neutralizer tank or a down-flow neutralizer tank.

Acid neutralizer water systems are typically installed after the well pressure tank.

In down-flow neutralizer tanks the media flows from the top of the media inside a vertical filter tank down to the bottom of the tank, and up a distributor tube and out of the filter to the household piping. Down-flow neutralizer tanks also act as filters since sediment and other fine particles become trapped in the Calcite. This type of neutralizer is automatically or manually backwashed to keep the media clean.

In an upflow neutralizer the water flows down through the center distributor tube and enters the media bed at the bottom and flows up through the media before exiting the neutralizer and flowing out to the plumbing. Up-flow neutralizers do not get backwashed because the media is never compacted and no sediment is removed. Since the water is flowing up through the media the media is not compacted to theoretically it does not require backwashing.

There are advantages and disadvantages to both up-flow and down-flow neutralizers. The main advantage of the down-flow neutralizer is that it not only neutralizes the water, it also acts as a whole house sediment filter. Down-flow neutralizers are usually automatically backwashed, which cleans the Calcite media and prevents rust particles and other sediment from fouling or coating the media. Since additional Calcite or blended media must be added to most neutralizers once or twice a year, down-flow neutralizers are easier to backwash and put back in service than up-flow neutralizers which cannot be backwashed.

Up-flow neutralizers must use an internal top screen in to order to prevent the Calcite from entering the home plumbing system. Calcite has the appearance of white sand and can quickly damage valves and fixtures if the media enters the plumbing system. If the water contains iron, manganese or sulfides, these internal top screens can later become fouled and so are generally are not used for this reason. Instead of the internal top screen, a filter housing and cartridge filter are usually installed after the up-flow neutralizer tank to prevent any mineral from flowing into the plumbing system. AdChoices7577471742534232713
With down-flow neutralizers these upper screens or external filter housings are unnecessary since the Calcite is prevented from leaving the filter tank due to the bottom internal distributor screen. The bottom distributor does not get easily fouled due to the backwashing the down-flow neutralizer tank receives on a regular basis.

In filter tanks the media can flow around the media and create channels which allow the water to flow without properly contacting the media. This type of channeling is more of a problem with up-flow neutralizers and rarely happens with down-flow neutralizers due to the action of the backwash. For most residential applications down-flow neutralizers work better than up-flow neutralizers due to the filtration feature and the backwashing function.

A down-flow neutralizer can be backwashed on a regular basis to clean, re-classify and distribute the calcium media thoroughly. This backwashing allows the down-flow neutralizer to function properly and lower maintenance costs. The Calcite media dissolves better because it is cleaned and then compacted in the down-flow neutralizer tank.

Well water that is acidic can also sometimes be high in iron, manganese or hydrogen sulfide. If a greensand or other type of manganese media iron filter is used to treat the water for iron, the pH should be raised up to at least 6.8 to allow the iron filter media to work properly. A down-flow neutralizer is usually the best choice to put in front of an iron filter because the neutralizer acts as a pre-filter removing some oxidized iron prior to the iron filter. This lessens the load of iron that the greensand filter must treat. Iron, manganese and sulfides can coat the acid neutralizer media and render it unable to dissolve into the water and neutralize the pH.

There are some applications where up-flow Calcite neutralizers are more desirable than down-flow neutralizers. If the flow is more or less constant on a regular basis, such as when the neutralizer is used to fill a holding tank with neutralized water, the up-flow filter works fine. Since up-flow neutralizers have no automatic backwash control valve they are less expensive than down-flow neutralizers. If the water is of excellent quality with no sediment or iron and the flow rate is constant then the up-flow neutralizer costs less to use and uses no backwash water.

Oct 14, 2012 | Plumbing

4 Answers

When backwashing...sand discharges out backwash hose..


A little sand in backwash is not uncommon. Many packaged sand filter systems use pumps whose flow rates greatly exceed the flow capacity of the filter.(the more horsepower the better, right? - Wrong) If this occurs only during back flush the the pump is too strong or the sand level is above the beginning of the rounded top of tank. The sand level will eventually correct itself.

Aug 10, 2012 | Hayward SAND FILTER, PRO SERIES

1 Answer

My pool won't run on backwash


A new Multivalve gasket (Or Cam) may be needed. you will need to disassemble the Multivalve.

Jul 23, 2012 | Hayward SAND FILTER, PRO SERIES

1 Answer

Have a Hayward side mount pro series sand filter. Just recently the top lid has been popping off . Clamp appears to be in good shape. getting a pressure build up. Any thoughts on the cause/


A pressure build up, indicates several possibilities: 1. An obstruction or closed valve after the filter. 2. A clogged filter. If your filter is equipped with a multiport valve, try the valve setting in the backwash or bypass settings and see if the pressure changes. in the bypass setting, if the pressure remains, you have an obstruction or closed valve after the filter. if the backwash setting causes the pressure to drop, you either have a seriously clogged filter or an obstruction or closed valve after the filter. Assuming the sand is less than 2 years in place, have you checked the sand condition by digging down into the sand deep and checking to see how much debris is still in it? Sand filters DO NOT backwash everything out and will build up over time, requiring a complete dump, clean and refill with fresh filtration sand. If you take the time 1 or twice a season to manually stir up the sand and then backwash repeatedly after stirring it up, you can keep the sand in place for several more years of service. If you live in an area with hard water, it is not unusual to see the sand turn hard like concrete and have to be replced after only a couple years of use. This is typical when pool water pH is high and proper maintenance of the chemistry is neglected. As to the lid popping off, this means the pressure is excessive or the clamp is damaged.

Another point to consider if the condition of the pressure gage... is the reading accurate? In most cases the reading should never be higher than 20, ideally, down around 10-15PSI on clean. Any reading higher, indicates a dirty filter or obstruction after the filter.

Aug 11, 2011 | Hayward SAND FILTER, PRO SERIES

3 Answers

I cant get my jl audio w6 10s to give off much bass with the jl audio 500/1 amp


here is a manual for your subwoofers: http://mobile.jlaudio.com/pdfs/8-12W6_BDS.pdf

use the wiring diagram for 1.5? (1.5ohm) with 2 speakers. the diagram for 3 speakers will not work, because it would bring the load down to 1 ohm, and the amp cannot go below 1.5 ohm.

to set up the amp:

under "preamp output section", on the "output mode" switch, select "amp filter"

to set up the levels: start with the amp gain pretty far down- with the input voltage on low for line level outputs from the deck, and on high for speaker outputs from the deck. now turn your cd deck as far up as it will go until it distorts, then turn the cd deck down to just where it stops distorting. now, you can start to turn up the gain on the amp.

on the filters, youll prolly want the cutoff filter around 100hz @ 24db slope. start with the infrasonic filters off, but, if you do get into them, try centering between 30 and 60hz on either, and, possibly dropping the cutoff filter to 80hz.

Jan 31, 2011 | Jl Audio 500/1 Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

I have a square D pressure switch on my home well water system. I also have a Iron filter on the system. The problem I have is that when Iron remover is in it's backwash cycle at night and someone uses the...


I find it interesting that you never had this problem. Did something change, specifically on the backwash of the iron filter? Is is possible that there is lower restriction to backwash causing the lower pump pressure? Could you throttle the backwash flow to allow pressure to be maintained and still get adequate backwashing?
It seems a lot of water must be flowing so that when you use some water the pressure drops to more than 10 psi below cut-in, that means typically 30 psi shutoff point.
Can you lower cut-in pressure, say 5 psi, lower?

Jan 05, 2011 | Square D 9013gsg2s22j99r Pressure Switch

1 Answer

When I backwash or rinse my pump reservoir fills to the top when I filter I have air bubbles at pool discharge and reservoir about 3/4 full and air is evident. Do I need to start digging up my skimmer line...


When backwashing or rinsing the same water is used as in filtering.(skimmer and main drain) so I don't think skimmer damage is the issue. Check if the pool water is low at the skimmer after the backwash cycle, Also check to see if the skimmer weir gate (flapper) is stuck in the upright position. I would suggest 2 main checks. Fill the pool higher than usual, back wash, ensure the pool water level is 1/2 way up the skimmer level and try again. Also, if your lines are valved right, shut off the skimmer during the filter cycle and see what happens. Lastly, the gasket on your multi-port valve may be bad.

Jul 16, 2010 | Hayward 3/4hp Super Pump Inground Pool...

1 Answer

No water coming out when I backwash. I cleaned


water level must be about the discharge (eyeball) in the pool to back wash. Check the hose connections to make sure that hoses off the the filer head are going to the right place Look for the words "Pump" , "pool" and "waste" molded into the valve. I've seen it a number of times where "Pump" and "pool" were connected the wrong way.

Jul 04, 2009 | Hayward SAND FILTER, PRO SERIES

2 Answers

Water softener doesn't work properly


Check for iron content of the water in your area. Excessive iron will clog the zeolite beads in your softener and reduce its life. You can try increasing the backwash and rinse cycles to see if it helps. You can also get an iron pre-filter for a softener. I am assuming you have either a private well or a municipal well.

Mar 17, 2009 | Kitchen Appliances - Others

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