Question about Whirlpool GGQ8831L Gas Dryer

1 Answer

Tested every part for continuity, replaced ignitor, still no heat

I laid a voltmeter on every pair of contacts - fuse, thermostats, high temp thing by the igniter, the pair of little barrels that look like capacitors... all have continuity. The ignitor had continuity as well, but I replaced it anyway as the most likely culprit and something which may test ok but be low on heat.

The gas lines are on (water heater on same branch is fine) and the barrell spins fine. The ducting is 100% clear, that's the first thing I tried.

I'm an experienced remodeling contractor. Not afraid to replace gas pipes off the branch, seems like delivery might be the only thing left.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Ben

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  • 1,606 Answers

If the dryer runs , but no heat , then the thermal fuse is probably the problem . Unplug the dryer and remove the lower front panel . Remove the inside filter from inside the dryer , and remove the filter housing form the front , held on by 2 screws and the clip holding it to the blower housing . You will see 2 wires going to a flat egg shaped piece ( you may not be able to see the piece , but you can see the wires ) . This is on the left of the visible thermostat . Remove the 2 wires from this piece and put them togather . Plug in dryer and see if burner lights then . If so , then replace the thermal fuse . Pt # 3392519 .

Posted on Sep 10, 2009

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Continues to blow the high temp stat. I clean the blower and replaced the venting. I also replaced the heating coil the dryer heats up for a load and then it stopss heating. I test the high temp stat


DRYER OVERHEATING:

Heating Element
A defective heating element can make a dryer too hot. If the element partially shorts out, it can produce heat all the time, regardless of whether the dryer is calling for heat. Remove the heating element to inspect it. The coils should not be touching each other or anything else.

Other Causes and Conditions
Air Flow Problem
Dryers need good ventilation to work properly. If the vent is clogged it can make the dryer too hot. Clean all of the vent tubing thoroughly.

Cycling Thermostat
Although not common, a defective cycling thermostat can make the dryer too hot. The cycling thermostat is supposed to turn on and off the heat to maintain the proper temperature. If the thermostat is defective it may keep the heat on too long. The thermostat is not adjustable or repairable, it must be replaced.

Felt Seal
Most dryers have a felt seal at the front and rear of the drum to keep the heat inside the drum. If the felt seal is worn away or missing, the dryer may keep heating and make the dryer too hot. This is not common.

Blower Wheel
A defective blower wheel will not spin properly and will not vent the hot air, making the dryer too hot. Check to see if there is adequate airflow out of the dryer.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3m5NZvY9V5Q

Feb 17, 2015 | Dryers

1 Answer

Dryer is not heating. where is the heat sensor on DLE5001W


On a gas dryer the gas assembly is simply powered up by a sensor on the blower housing. If heat is called for from upstairs the power flows through the bimetal mounted on the blower housing. Here is a simple bi-metal: themobilian_2460.jpg
See the 4 wires? 2 of them wires operate a small heater inside the control. when it gets heated it shuts down faster for permapress and knits. Next to the control is a fuse on most models as seen here:
themobilian_2461.jpg
That fuse blows if the air temp exceeds 350f. That control thermostat at its hottest setting of cotton shuts down at 160f. It ramps back up at 105f. and continues to send power to the gas assembly till it feels 160f and then it shuts down. SOOO.. if we have a good fuse and a good thermostat 120 volts should get to the gas assembly if heat is needed. The gas assembly has a flame sensor which detects the heat bouncing off the ignitor. An ignitor to light off the gas, and a pair of holding coils. The whole gas assembly is energized at one. But them coils will not supply gas until the ignitor drops out if the circuit. To do so the flame sensor bi metal must shut down the power to the ignitor and that frees up the power to charge them coils and yank open the valve. The gas hits the ignitor and whoosh we have fire in the hole. It takes literally no time for the temp to reach 160 in the blower housing and so the power is removed from the gas assembly and the dryer tumbles onward absorbing the heat till the temp drops down to 105f and that control once again powers up the gas assembly. If your flame sensor is working and shutting down the ignitor and the heat works once or twice but quits then them solenoids are getting hot and quitting because they are old and weak. Replace em and party on.
themobilian_2462.jpgthemobilian_2463.jpgthemobilian_2464.jpg
themobilian_2465.jpg

Jun 18, 2011 | Whirlpool LGQ8000JQ Gas Dryer

1 Answer

No heat


HI. There are a few areas i would advise to check to resolve this issue.

The dryer uses multiple thermostats to regulate the temperature. When the temperature is higher than the preset limit of a particular thermostat, the thermostat breaks the circuit and the heater goes off. When the temperature cools enough, the thermostat closes the circuit again and the heat can come on.

Most dryers have a choice of temperature settings, therefore a separate thermostat is used for each setting. The selector switch or timer control then routes the circuit through the appropriate thermostat.

If a thermostat fails, it may prevent the heat from coming on, This happens because the thermostat does not close the circuit when the temperature falls below the operating temperature of the switch. It is a simple matter to test a thermostat; it should show continuity when the switch is cool and no continuity when it is warmer than its rated temperature.

A thermostat can also fail by being always on, no matter what the temperature. This switch would show continuity whether it was hot or cold. In this case, the heater would not shut off and the the dryer could dangerously overheat. As a safety precaution a second thermostat is used, This is called a thermal fuse. The power will be cut to the heating circuit if the maximum safe temperature is exceeded. In most cases, this is a one time fuse. The heater circuit will not function until the fuse has been replaced. Of course, it will be necessary to determine and repair the underlying cause of overheating or the fuse will just cut out again. The most common cause of overheating will be a clogged ventilation assembly. Be sure to inspect the entire ventilation Assembly for build up. This will cause issues, if obstructions exist.

The thermostats are usually grouped together. The are typically oval in shape and about an inch and a half in size. They may be on the blower housing, under the lint trap or inside the vent line. There should be two wires connected to each thermostat.

Label the wires and connections so that you can properly reconnect them later. The wires are connected with slip on connectors. Firmly pull the connectors off of the terminals. You may need to use a pair of needle-nose pliers to remove the connectors. Inspect the connectors and the terminals for corrosion. If either is corroded they should be cleaned or replaced.

To test the thermostats or fuse, set the multimeter to the ohms setting X1. Touch one probe to each terminal. You should get a reading of either zero or infinity. At room temperature, the thermostats should have a reading of zero. When the thermostats are heated to their limit temperature, they should switch off and you should get a reading of infinity. The fuse should be tested at room temperature for continuity.

Now, if the thermostat and fuse are operational, and working properly, This will lead to the burner assembly. The ignitor, and the gas valve coils are the next possible issues.

IGNITOR

The easiest way to check the ignitor is to observe it. Remove the small access panel in front, select a high temperature setting and start the dryer. Watch the burner assembly, shortly after starting the unit the ignitor should begin to glow or spark. If you see it glow or spark, then the ignitor is working. If the ignitor did not appear to function and it is the spark type, it may be out of adjustment which generally requires professional service or it may require replacement. If the ignitor is the glow type, you can test it for resistance with a multimeter.


The ignitor has two wires connected to it.Label the wires and connections so that you can properly reconnect them later. The wires are connected with slip on connectors. Firmly pull the connectors off of the terminals (do not pull on the wire itself). You may need to use a pair of needle-nose pliers to remove the connectors. Inspect the connectors and the terminals for corrosion. If either is corroded they should be cleaned or replaced.

Set the multimeter to the ohms setting X1. Touch one probe to each terminal. You should get a reading anywhere between 50 and 600 ohms. If you get a reading of zero or infinity, the ignitor is definitely bad and will need to be replaced.


GAS VALVE COILS

On the gas valve are one or two coils (solenoids) used to open and close the valve to control the flow of gas. If a coil fails, gas will not flow and the dryer will have no heat.

The easiest way to diagnose a problem in the burner assembly is to observe the burner operation. Remove the small access panel at the bottom, front of the dryer, select a high temperature setting and start the appliance. Watch the burner assembly, shortly after starting the dryer the ignitor should begin to glow. Next you should hear the click of the gas valve coil and a flame should ignite. The flame should be mostly blue and it should remain on for a minute or more.

If the ignitor glows for several seconds (up to 15 seconds) and then goes out, the problem is probably the coils (solenoids). If the ignitor glows and stays on, then the problem is usually the flame sensor. If it ignites and then quickly goes out, it is most likely a problem with inadequate air flow.Test the coil for resistance using a multimeter. Set the multimeter to the ohms setting X10. Place a probe on each terminal. The multimeter should change from a reading of infinity to roughly 1300 ohms (+/- 150 ohms) when the probes touch the terminals. If the reading is infinity or substantially different from 1300 ohms, the solenoid should be replaced.

Dec 11, 2009 | Maytag Dryers

1 Answer

Kenmore elite HE3 gas dryer. No heat,


HI. There are a few areas i would advise to check to resolve this issue.

The dryer uses multiple thermostats to regulate the temperature. When the temperature is higher than the preset limit of a particular thermostat, the thermostat breaks the circuit and the heater goes off. When the temperature cools enough, the thermostat closes the circuit again and the heat can come on.

Most dryers have a choice of temperature settings, therefore a separate thermostat is used for each setting. The selector switch or timer control then routes the circuit through the appropriate thermostat.

If a thermostat fails, it may prevent the heat from coming on, This happens because the thermostat does not close the circuit when the temperature falls below the operating temperature of the switch. It is a simple matter to test a thermostat; it should show continuity when the switch is cool and no continuity when it is warmer than its rated temperature.

A thermostat can also fail by being always on, no matter what the temperature. This switch would show continuity whether it was hot or cold. In this case, the heater would not shut off and the the dryer could dangerously overheat. As a safety precaution a second thermostat is used, This is called a thermal fuse. The power will be cut to the heating circuit if the maximum safe temperature is exceeded. In most cases, this is a one time fuse. The heater circuit will not function until the fuse has been replaced. Of course, it will be necessary to determine and repair the underlying cause of overheating or the fuse will just cut out again. The most common cause of overheating will be a clogged ventilation assembly. Be sure to inspect the entire ventilation Assembly for build up. This will cause issues, if obstructions exist.

The thermostats are usually grouped together. The are typically oval in shape and about an inch and a half in size. They may be on the blower housing, under the lint trap or inside the vent line. There should be two wires connected to each thermostat.

Label the wires and connections so that you can properly reconnect them later. The wires are connected with slip on connectors. Firmly pull the connectors off of the terminals. You may need to use a pair of needle-nose pliers to remove the connectors. Inspect the connectors and the terminals for corrosion. If either is corroded they should be cleaned or replaced.

To test the thermostats or fuse, set the multimeter to the ohms setting X1. Touch one probe to each terminal. You should get a reading of either zero or infinity. At room temperature, the thermostats should have a reading of zero. When the thermostats are heated to their limit temperature, they should switch off and you should get a reading of infinity. The fuse should be tested at room temperature for continuity.


Now, if all is well with all that is stated above, and the thermostats and fuse are all ok, move on the the heating assembly.

ignitor

The easiest way to check the ignitor is to observe it. Remove the small access panel in front, select a high temperature setting and start the dryer. Watch the burner assembly, shortly after starting the unit the ignitor should begin to glow or spark. If you see it glow or spark, then the ignitor is working. If the ignitor did not appear to function and it is the spark type, it may be out of adjustment which generally requires professional service or it may require replacement. If the ignitor is the glow type, you can test it for resistance with a multimeter.


The ignitor has two wires connected to it.Label the wires and connections so that you can properly reconnect them later. The wires are connected with slip on connectors. Firmly pull the connectors off of the terminals (do not pull on the wire itself). You may need to use a pair of needle-nose pliers to remove the connectors. Inspect the connectors and the terminals for corrosion. If either is corroded they should be cleaned or replaced.

Set the multimeter to the ohms setting X1. Touch one probe to each terminal. You should get a reading anywhere between 50 and 600 ohms. If you get a reading of zero or infinity, the ignitor is definitely bad and will need to be replaced.


GAS VALVE COILS

On the gas valve are one or two coils (solenoids) used to open and close the valve to control the flow of gas. If a coil fails, gas will not flow and the dryer will have no heat.

The easiest way to diagnose a problem in the burner assembly is to observe the burner operation. Remove the small access panel at the bottom, front of the dryer, select a high temperature setting and start the appliance. Watch the burner assembly, shortly after starting the dryer the ignitor should begin to glow. Next you should hear the click of the gas valve coil and a flame should ignite. The flame should be mostly blue and it should remain on for a minute or more.

If the ignitor glows for several seconds (up to 15 seconds) and then goes out, the problem is probably the coils (solenoids). If the ignitor glows and stays on, then the problem is usually the flame sensor. If it ignites and then quickly goes out, it is most likely a problem with inadequate air flow.Test the coil for resistance using a multimeter. Set the multimeter to the ohms setting X10. Place a probe on each terminal. The multimeter should change from a reading of infinity to roughly 1300 ohms (+/- 150 ohms) when the probes touch the terminals. If the reading is infinity or substantially different from 1300 ohms, the solenoid should be replaced.

Nov 26, 2009 | Kenmore Elite HE4 Electric Dryer

1 Answer

IHAVE A HOVER SIX TC650 WHICH WILL NOT HEAT UP ALTHOUGH THE DRUM IS WORKING FINE AND SPINNING.HAVE CHECKED THE FILTERS AND THEY ARE FINE.WHAT CAN BE WRONG


Hi.

Test and eventually replace the Dryer thermal fuse
The fuse is located on the blower wheel cover.
The fuse can be tested using a multimeter.
If the fuse has continuity , then is good.

Test the heating element and the thermostat Thermal cut-off .

Both are tested using a multimeter to read impedance. Set multimeter at Rx1, on Ohms.

To test the element disconnect element and point tester probes at element contact.
If there is no continuity, and the circuit is open, then the element is faulty.

The thermostat can be tested jumping its wires to bypass it, but there are many safety concerns doing this kind of test.
Better disconnecting the thermostat and reading Ohms, as for the element.
At room temp the thermostat must have low impedance, if it goes to infinity, and circuit is open at room temperature, then the thermostat is bad.

If both test good, and you have no heating at all, then it may be a bad electronic control, or a wiring problem.

All test and repair must be done by a technician.

If you need to contact a technician you can call the number listed on the owners manual.


Nov 14, 2009 | Hoover Dryers

1 Answer

No heat but have strong air..


Test and eventually replace the Dryer thermal fuse
The fuse is located on the blower wheel cover.
The fuse can be tested using a multimeter.
If the fuse has continuity , then is good.

Test the heating element and the thermostat Thermal cut-off .

Both are tested using a multimeter to read impedance. Set multimeter at Rx1, on Ohms.

To test the element disconnect element and point tester probes at element contact.
If there is no continuity, and the circuit is open, then the element is faulty.

The thermostat can be tested jumping its wires to bypass it, but there are many safety concerns doing this kind of test.
Better disconnecting the thermostat and reading Ohms, as for the element.
At room temp the thermostat must have low impedance, if it goes to infinity, and circuit is open at room temperature, then the thermostat is bad.

If both test good, and you have no heating at all, then it may be a bad electronic control, or a wiring problem.

All test and repair must be done by a technician.

If you need to contact a technician you can call the number listed on the owners manual.

Nov 13, 2009 | Kenmore Dryers

1 Answer

No heat everything works vent not clogged kitchenaid kgys777qo


HI. There are a few areas i would advise to check to resolve this issue.

The dryer uses multiple thermostats to regulate the temperature. When the temperature is higher than the preset limit of a particular thermostat, the thermostat breaks the circuit and the heater goes off. When the temperature cools enough, the thermostat closes the circuit again and the heat can come on.



Most dryers have a choice of temperature settings, therefore a separate thermostat is used for each setting. The selector switch or timer control then routes the circuit through the appropriate thermostat.

If a thermostat fails, it may prevent the heat from coming on, This happens because the thermostat does not close the circuit when the temperature falls below the operating temperature of the switch. It is a simple matter to test a thermostat; it should show continuity when the switch is cool and no continuity when it is warmer than its rated temperature.

A thermostat can also fail by being always on, no matter what the temperature. This switch would show continuity whether it was hot or cold. In this case, the heater would not shut off and the the dryer could dangerously overheat. As a safety precaution a second thermostat is used, This is called a thermal fuse. The power will be cut to the heating circuit if the maximum safe temperature is exceeded. In most cases, this is a one time fuse. The heater circuit will not function until the fuse has been replaced. Of course, it will be necessary to determine and repair the underlying cause of overheating or the fuse will just cut out again.

The thermostats are usually grouped together. The are typically oval in shape and about an inch and a half in size. They may be on the blower housing, under the lint trap or inside the vent line. There should be two wires connected to each thermostat.

Label the wires and connections so that you can properly reconnect them later. The wires are connected with slip on connectors. Firmly pull the connectors off of the terminals. You may need to use a pair of needle-nose pliers to remove the connectors. Inspect the connectors and the terminals for corrosion. If either is corroded they should be cleaned or replaced.

To test the thermostats or fuse, set the multimeter to the ohms setting X1. Touch one probe to each terminal. You should get a reading of either zero or infinity. At room temperature, the thermostats should have a reading of zero. When the thermostats are heated to their limit temperature, they should switch off and you should get a reading of infinity. The fuse should be tested at room temperature for continuity.

Ok,If all is well with the thermostats and fuse, i would advise to move on to the burner assembly. Normally, if the thermostats are operational , and the thermal fuse is showing continuity, this will lead to a damaged gas valve component. Check the ignitor first, than the gas valve coils last.

IGNITOR

The easiest way to check the ignitor is to observe it. Remove the small access panel in front, select a high temperature setting and start the dryer. Watch the burner assembly, shortly after starting the unit the ignitor should begin to glow or spark. If you see it glow or spark, then the ignitor is working. If the ignitor did not appear to function and it is the spark type, it may be out of adjustment which generally requires professional service or it may require replacement. If the ignitor is the glow type, you can test it for resistance with a multimeter.


The ignitor has two wires connected to it.Label the wires and connections so that you can properly reconnect them later. The wires are connected with slip on connectors. Firmly pull the connectors off of the terminals (do not pull on the wire itself). You may need to use a pair of needle-nose pliers to remove the connectors. Inspect the connectors and the terminals for corrosion. If either is corroded they should be cleaned or replaced.

Set the multimeter to the ohms setting X1. Touch one probe to each terminal. You should get a reading anywhere between 50 and 600 ohms. If you get a reading of zero or infinity, the ignitor is definitely bad and will need to be replaced.

GAS VALVE COMPONENTS(BURNER ASSEMBLY)

On the gas valve are one or two coils (solenoids) used to open and close the valve to control the flow of gas. If a coil fails, gas will not flow and the dryer will have no heat.

The easiest way to diagnose a problem in the burner assembly is to observe the burner operation. Remove the small access panel at the bottom, front of the dryer, select a high temperature setting and start the appliance. Watch the burner assembly, shortly after starting the dryer the ignitor should begin to glow. Next you should hear the click of the gas valve coil and a flame should ignite. The flame should be mostly blue and it should remain on for a minute or more.

If the ignitor glows for several seconds (up to 15 seconds) and then goes out, the problem is probably the coils (solenoids). If the ignitor glows and stays on, then the problem is usually the flame sensor. If it ignites and then quickly goes out, it is most likely a problem with inadequate air flow.Test the coil for resistance using a multimeter. Set the multimeter to the ohms setting X10. Place a probe on each terminal. The multimeter should change from a reading of infinity to roughly 1300 ohms (+/- 150 ohms) when the probes touch the terminals. If the reading is infinity or substantially different from 1300 ohms, the solenoid should be replaced.


Nov 05, 2009 | KitchenAid Dryers

2 Answers

My fisher & paykel gas dryer is not heating up


HI. There are a few areas i would advise to check to resolve this issue.

The dryer uses multiple thermostats to regulate the temperature. When the temperature is higher than the preset limit of a particular thermostat, the thermostat breaks the circuit and the heater goes off. When the temperature cools enough, the thermostat closes the circuit again and the heat can come on.



Most dryers have a choice of temperature settings, therefore a separate thermostat is used for each setting. The selector switch or timer control then routes the circuit through the appropriate thermostat.

If a thermostat fails, it may prevent the heat from coming on, This happens because the thermostat does not close the circuit when the temperature falls below the operating temperature of the switch. It is a simple matter to test a thermostat; it should show continuity when the switch is cool and no continuity when it is warmer than its rated temperature.

A thermostat can also fail by being always on, no matter what the temperature. This switch would show continuity whether it was hot or cold. In this case, the heater would not shut off and the the dryer could dangerously overheat. As a safety precaution a second thermostat is used, This is called a thermal fuse. The power will be cut to the heating circuit if the maximum safe temperature is exceeded. In most cases, this is a one time fuse. The heater circuit will not function until the fuse has been replaced. Of course, it will be necessary to determine and repair the underlying cause of overheating or the fuse will just cut out again.

The thermostats are usually grouped together. The are typically oval in shape and about an inch and a half in size. They may be on the blower housing, under the lint trap or inside the vent line. There should be two wires connected to each thermostat.

Label the wires and connections so that you can properly reconnect them later. The wires are connected with slip on connectors. Firmly pull the connectors off of the terminals. You may need to use a pair of needle-nose pliers to remove the connectors. Inspect the connectors and the terminals for corrosion. If either is corroded they should be cleaned or replaced.

To test the thermostats or fuse, set the multimeter to the ohms setting X1. Touch one probe to each terminal. You should get a reading of either zero or infinity. At room temperature, the thermostats should have a reading of zero. When the thermostats are heated to their limit temperature, they should switch off and you should get a reading of infinity. The fuse should be tested at room temperature for continuity.

Ok, once you have ruled out any thermostat and fuse issues, and the venting is not clogged, this will lead to the valve assembly.

On the gas valve are one or two coils (solenoids) used to open and close the valve to control the flow of gas. If a coil fails, gas will not flow and the dryer will have no heat.

The easiest way to diagnose a problem in the burner assembly is to observe the burner operation. Remove the small access panel at the bottom, front of the dryer, select a high temperature setting and start the appliance. Watch the burner assembly, shortly after starting the dryer the ignitor should begin to glow. Next you should hear the click of the gas valve coil and a flame should ignite. The flame should be mostly blue and it should remain on for a minute or more.

If the ignitor glows for several seconds (up to 15 seconds) and then goes out, the problem is probably the coils (solenoids). If the ignitor glows and stays on, then the problem is usually the flame sensor. If it ignites and then quickly goes out, it is most likely a problem with inadequate air flow.Test the coil for resistance using a multimeter. Set the multimeter to the ohms setting X10. Place a probe on each terminal. The multimeter should change from a reading of infinity to roughly 1300 ohms (+/- 150 ohms) when the probes touch the terminals. If the reading is infinity or substantially different from 1300 ohms, the solenoid should be replaced.

Additionally, i would inspect the ignitor as well.



The easiest way to check the ignitor is to observe it. Remove the small access panel in front, select a high temperature setting and start the dryer. Watch the burner assembly, shortly after starting the unit the ignitor should begin to glow or spark. If you see it glow or spark, then the ignitor is working. If the ignitor did not appear to function and it is the spark type, it may be out of adjustment which generally requires professional service or it may require replacement. If the ignitor is the glow type, you can test it for resistance with a multimeter.


The ignitor has two wires connected to it.Label the wires and connections so that you can properly reconnect them later. The wires are connected with slip on connectors. Firmly pull the connectors off of the terminals (do not pull on the wire itself). You may need to use a pair of needle-nose pliers to remove the connectors. Inspect the connectors and the terminals for corrosion. If either is corroded they should be cleaned or replaced.

Set the multimeter to the ohms setting X1. Touch one probe to each terminal. You should get a reading anywhere between 50 and 600 ohms. If you get a reading of zero or infinity, the ignitor is definitely bad and will need to be replaced.

Nov 02, 2009 | Fisher and Paykel DGGX1 Electric Dryer

1 Answer

DRYER WONT HEAT UP GAS MODEL LDG7304AAE


HI. There are a few areas i would advise to check to resolve this issue.

The dryer uses multiple thermostats to regulate the temperature. When the temperature is higher than the preset limit of a particular thermostat, the thermostat breaks the circuit and the heater goes off. When the temperature cools enough, the thermostat closes the circuit again and the heat can come on.



Most dryers have a choice of temperature settings, therefore a separate thermostat is used for each setting. The selector switch or timer control then routes the circuit through the appropriate thermostat.

If a thermostat fails, it may prevent the heat from coming on, This happens because the thermostat does not close the circuit when the temperature falls below the operating temperature of the switch. It is a simple matter to test a thermostat; it should show continuity when the switch is cool and no continuity when it is warmer than its rated temperature.

A thermostat can also fail by being always on, no matter what the temperature. This switch would show continuity whether it was hot or cold. In this case, the heater would not shut off and the the dryer could dangerously overheat. As a safety precaution a second thermostat is used, This is called a thermal fuse. The power will be cut to the heating circuit if the maximum safe temperature is exceeded. In most cases, this is a one time fuse. The heater circuit will not function until the fuse has been replaced. Of course, it will be necessary to determine and repair the underlying cause of overheating or the fuse will just cut out again.

The thermostats are usually grouped together. The are typically oval in shape and about an inch and a half in size. They may be on the blower housing, under the lint trap or inside the vent line. There should be two wires connected to each thermostat.

Label the wires and connections so that you can properly reconnect them later. The wires are connected with slip on connectors. Firmly pull the connectors off of the terminals. You may need to use a pair of needle-nose pliers to remove the connectors. Inspect the connectors and the terminals for corrosion. If either is corroded they should be cleaned or replaced.

To test the thermostats or fuse, set the multimeter to the ohms setting X1. Touch one probe to each terminal. You should get a reading of either zero or infinity. At room temperature, the thermostats should have a reading of zero. When the thermostats are heated to their limit temperature, they should switch off and you should get a reading of infinity. The fuse should be tested at room temperature for continuity. Replace any thermostat/fuse that dose not pass the above testing procedure.

NOTE(If you are hearing a clicking near the gas valve assembly, this will lead to a set of bad valve coils. they should be replaced in this case. I would also recommend checking the entire venting assembly for blockages. Make sure the vent duct, and blower housing is clear of any obstructions. Last, if the thermostats and fuse check out ok, check the ignitor for its operational value).


Ignitor testing procedure.


The easiest way to check the ignitor is to observe it. Remove the small access panel in front, select a high temperature setting and start the dryer. Watch the burner assembly, shortly after starting the unit the ignitor should begin to glow or spark. If you see it glow or spark, then the ignitor is working. If the ignitor did not appear to function and it is the spark type, it may be out of adjustment which generally requires professional service or it may require replacement. If the ignitor is the glow type, you can test it for resistance with a multimeter.


The ignitor has two wires connected to it.Label the wires and connections so that you can properly reconnect them later. The wires are connected with slip on connectors. Firmly pull the connectors off of the terminals (do not pull on the wire itself). You may need to use a pair of needle-nose pliers to remove the connectors. Inspect the connectors and the terminals for corrosion. If either is corroded they should be cleaned or replaced.

Set the multimeter to the ohms setting X1. Touch one probe to each terminal. You should get a reading anywhere between 50 and 600 ohms. If you get a reading of zero or infinity, the ignitor is definitely bad and will need to be replaced.

Oct 27, 2009 | Dryers

1 Answer

My dryer dont dry


Possible causes depend on the dryer model and type. Electric dryers work diffeently from gas dryer.

Both electric and gas dryers usually have a thermal fuse located at the back of the appliance. Check if thermal fuse/switch is blown or tripped , and eventually replace it.

If the fuse is ok, and appliance is running but not drying, then next part to test will be the thermostat.

A dryer thermostat can be tested using a multimeter , set to read impedance at RX1. If the thermostat is good, it must have low Ohms at room temp, and return no continuity (infinite ohms) at temp. limit.

At this points things are different depending if dryer is gas or electrical.

On a gas dryer test valve , fan and ignitor.

On electric test the heating element and fan.

On both gas and electric, last part to be tested is the timer control board. If all other parts are fine, go for the timer board.

Sep 17, 2009 | Kenmore 55612 / 55614 / 5561 / 655619 Side...

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