Question about Onkyo TX-SR601 Receiver

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No output to subwoofer.

I am using a self powered subwoofer and I can hear a 60 cycle hum when I put my finger on the end of the RCA plug at the amplifier. I do have it turned on and the crossover is set to 100 cycles. What did I miss??? Is there another switch in the software that I need to switch on the subwoofer output besides the "yes" in the program? Any suggestions would be appreciated. Wyman

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No that is normal if it does it wile using and ur not touching it make sure power plug isnt touching the coard. and some anps do that when they r turned up to loud. or worn input or output plug

Posted on Sep 10, 2009

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Why does my HTS-20 powered subwoofer make a low hum when plugged in, even turned off and not connected to the receiver and a louder hum when the subwoofer power is turned on?


I suspect the amplifier is damaged. This is not an easy repair to do unless you are well versed in audio electronics. I would recommend a repair shop to look at the subwoofer amplifier.

Jun 03, 2015 | Infinity HTS-20 System

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No power, some hum!!!! in side


Power supply is defective. The hum you hear is 60 cycles from an improperly filtered dc line.

Apr 05, 2015 | Audio Players & Recorders

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Loud hum from subwoofer


The number-one cause of subwoofer/speaker hum is the coaxial cable connecting your cable or satellite receiver to your provider (either through an inground run to a cable box or through a satellite dish). Here is how you test for this:
  1. Turn your system on and get it to produce the hum by watching a movie. Pause your DVD or videotape so that the hum is all you hear.
    TIPDon't use a normal cable or satellite program for this; you're about to disconnect the cable that provides the audio and video for your cable/satellite feed.
  2. Find the coaxial cable running from your cable or satellite receiver to your service provider, and while listening to the hum, unscrew the connector and disconnect the cable.
Did the hum stop or reduce by a large amount? If so, the cable you disconnected is the source of the noise. If this is the problem, you have several ways to fix the issue permanently (if not, jump ahead to the next section):
  1. Call your cable or satellite company and ask for a service call. Sometimes you get a smart cable guy, and if you demonstrate the problem he can do something upstream to ground the coaxial cable and remove or reduce the hum.
  2. Buy a power strip that has F connectors as part of its surge protection. Plug the strip into the AC outlet and feed your main coaxial signal through these connectors. This ties the shielding of the coax (the source of the noise) to your AC ground and sometimes can solve the problem.
    WARNINGOddly enough, this solution (surge protection) can sometimes increase the humming.
  3. Go to your local RadioShack store and buy three inexpensive items: a Matching Transformer (part #15-1253), an Indoor/Outdoor Matching Transformer (#15-1140), and a Cable Coupler (#278-304). Connect your coaxial cable to the cable coupler, and then to the first matching transformer. The output is two screws for the old two-wire antenna wire. Your indoor/outdoor matching transformer has two connectors for the screws, and the other end is a coaxial connector. Hook your cable or satellite receiver into this connector and see if the hum goes away.
Here is why this trick works: the first transformer converts your 75-ohm coax into a 300-ohm antenna connector. The second transformer converts the 300-ohm back to a 75-ohm connector. The humming, which usually is at around 60 Hz, can't pass through these conversions.

Ground Loop Hum

The second cause of hum is called a ground loop, and it almost always shows up right after you bring home a brand-new, self-powered subwoofer, or perhaps an external amplifier.
Take a look at all the plugs on the power cords on your home theater equipment. In most systems, the receiver (or amplifier) has a three-prong power plug, but most of your other devices have only two-prong plugs. This is not by accident; the device with the three-prong power plug is grounded. This means that device "owns" the ground. As long as no other power device has a three-prong plug, everything works well.
When you bring home a self-powered subwoofer and plug it in, though, you might notice it has a three-prong plug; this is for safety reasons. However, when you connect an RCA cable from your receiver to your subwoofer and turn everything on, you suddenly notice a loud hum.
The external amplifier in your subwoofer is now fighting with the amplifier in your receiver for possession of the ground. Both devices want to define 0.00 volts. But because the wiring in the two amplifiers to your household AC ground is different, one device is really using 0.001 volt and the other device uses something closer to 0.003 volts. The subwoofer cable connects the two, and the fighting begins.
You have to stop these two devices from trying to own the ground, or get them to not "see" each other. First, make your system produce the humming noise. Disconnect the single RCA cable between your receiver and subwoofer. Did the noise stop? If so, you have a ground loop issue.
The proper, safest way to solve this problem is to buy a special subwoofer cable with little arrows on the wire to show the signal direction (see ).
[img src="http://oreilly.com/images/hacks/htheaterhks/figs/htheaterhks_0601.jpg">
Figure 1. Subwoofer cable with directional arrowUnfortunately, many people have been ridiculed when asking about these sorts of cables at their local electronics store: "But cables don't really have a direction. My expert friend at work laughed at me when I asked about this!" Yes, your friend is right. Cables don't have a direction, but these little arrows indicate that this cable will prevent or solve your ground loop problem.
Remember when I said the hum started when you connected the RCA cable? That RCA cable really contains two wires: the center wire and something called the shield. The center wire carries the audio signal, but the shield tries to define 0.00 volts. The shield is the wire that lets the two different components (the receiver or amplifier, and the subwoofer) see each other's ground, and causes the fight. What if you took your subwoofer cable and disconnected the shielding from just one end? Wouldn't that solve the problem? Yes, it would. This is exactly what a subwoofer cable with little arrows does. The shield is not connected at both ends. The shield has to be connected at one end, for connecting to your receiver or amp, so you should run the cable so that the arrows show the flow from the receiver to the subwoofer.
WARNINGIt is unsafe to use a two-prong to three-prong "cheater" plug on the subwoofer power cord to solve the hum problem. Even if the subwoofer came with a cheater plug in the box, it's REALLY not safe to do. Don't do it.

Sep 01, 2013 | Denon Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

My powered sub is humming


Does the humming go away if the cable is plugged in but you wiggle it? May be a bad connection on the input jack.

Mar 22, 2013 | Klipsch Audio Players & Recorders

3 Answers

Powered subwoofer has hum


First of all confirm if the hum is an internal or external problem.
Disconnect the RCA sub woofer input from the back of the unit and turn it on. If there is no hum it could be the interconnecting cable or the output from the receiver. But in the stand alone mode if the sub woofer hums when powered on you have internal problem and will have to be looked into by a professional.
Many a time the earth or the shield of the interconnecting cable is the culprit, because the sub sits on the floor and you might shift it for cleaning the floor and the cable can stretch and snap internally.

Apr 01, 2011 | JBL SCS145.5 System

2 Answers

I have a Boston Acoustics VR-500 Subwoofer with a problem. As soon as anything is plugged into the line level RCA jacks, the subwoofer produces a loud buzz/hum. I have tried connecting it to the subwoofer...


I'm thinking you have an open shield ground on the RCA input side. Connecting speaker inputs possibly restores the ground. Try connecting the high level inputs then disconnect the remote end of the cables (floating the grounds).

Then get out an ohmmeter and find that open circuitor or bad solder joint between RCA ground and real ground in the speaker's amplifier. Or.... if speaker ground kills the hum and you want to use RCA Line Level input to the sub, just connect one minus speaker output on your source amp to one minus on the sub's amp.

Mar 01, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Subwoofer turns on but no sound


put an RCA cable to the inputs and while touching the end of the RCA, increase the volume gradually to hear a 60HZ humming sound...check also with the settings or mode. What particular subwoofer model is this? do you have a picture of the panel plate? pls send to jhunn06 at gmail dot com

Aug 10, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

HOW DO I PLUG UP THE SUBWOOFER TO AMPLIFIER


On the back of the amp, there should be a jack with the name "SUBWOOFER PRE OUT". It is a standard RCA jack, but it only puts out a line output, meaning only self-powered subwoofers will work with it. Usually, if the subwoofer does not have an amp, it will have 2 imputs and 2 outputs. You plug the two left and right inputs into the front speaker jack on the amp, and then plug the front speakers into the left and right amp on the subwoofer.

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1 Answer

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you will need a line-level converter to use this subwoofer- it is a rectangular-shaped box with wires coming out on one end and red-and-white RCA plugs one the other. The end with the wires coming out will hook to the receiver, and the other end will need to plug into the sub.

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2 Answers

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  • If your receiver has a dedicated subwoofer line level output, we recommend connecting your subwoofer to this jack. Most receivers will have just one (mono) subwoofer output, while quite a few subs require two inputs. You can use an RCA "Y" adapter cord , which is a cable with one female RCA jack at one end, and two male RCA plugs at the other. Some receivers require menu settings (such as "sub-on" or "front speakers-small") that must be made before the sub output will be active.

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