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I'm installing a 40A 2-pole CH GFCI breaker in a Square-D panel that is supplying a hot tub. The 8-3 cable runs to a sub-panel beneath in the crawl space beneath the tub. The new GFCI trips immediately upon closing. I opened the breaker in the crawl space and it tripped upon closing. I removed the breaker in the crawl space and it did the same. I disconnected the two hot leads at the GFCI and it tripped upon closing. The only lead left was the neutral so I disconnected that at the GFCI and it remained closed. I find it hard to believe induced voltage could somehow do this. The neutral line and ground line are connected to the same bar in the sub-panel. Can you help?

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  • gsawtelle Sep 08, 2009

    Are you there?

  • gsawtelle Sep 08, 2009

    I'm assuming you are there. The two hot line conductors are connected to the two hot terminals on the GFCI. The neutral conductor is connected to the neutral terminal on the GFCI breaker. I understand how a GFCI works and have installed single pole versions before. The pig-tail lead is connected to the neutral bar in the panel. The ground lead is also connected to that point. There are two bridges of screw connectors on the neutral bar of the panel. The ground wire and neutral pig-tail may be on different bridges. I'm not at the location at this moment.

  • jeepfxr May 11, 2010

    where on the gfci are you connecting the neutral ? the ground and neutral do go on the same bar in the panel.

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Try this...

You mentioned a 8-3 cable suppling power to the sub-panel. I am assuming you have a 8-3 WITH ground or 4 conductors, black, red, white AND ground.

In the sub-panel do not bond the neutral bar to the box or ground bar. If there is a green bonding screw on the neutral bar...remove it. If you have only one (1) neutral bar add another bar for your grounds and bond this bar to the box. Keep the neutrals isolated from the grounds.

I hope this has helped. If you need additional information please send me a follow-question.

Posted on Sep 10, 2009

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