Question about Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm Lens

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I got some dots in every pictures i have taken and it's all on the same spot. what are these? is this a pixel problem? can it be fixed?

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  • dtom May 11, 2010

    Is it a white spot or dark/black spot?

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  • Master
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Not quite enough information for solve.

have you printed these pics and seen the spots?
whayt happens if you print it on a different printer.
Are these dots visible on the preview of the camera?

It could be moisture spot ore dirt inside ofthe camera or even the lense itself Sometimes bacteria will grow inside the lense.
Inspect the lens itself, as well as the mirror insie the camera to see if there is dirt or speck on them.

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Posted on Sep 07, 2009

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I have a Nikon coolpix 5700. Recently have taken a bunch of pictures that ended up having pink spots show up on the pictures. It does not matter what setting the camera is on or how the zoom is set it...


Your CCD sensor most likely has what is referred to as a "dead pixel" or "stuck pixel", which is a pixel in the sensor that is not functioning properly anymore. There is not much to do to get it fixed. If you have an image editing program such as photoshop, corel draw or gimp, it is very simple to clone or heal the pixel out.

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Are you sure that there is balck dot on the sreen. Check one more time is it any dust on the screen.
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Whoops! Clicked the wrong icon before. Here's my solution:

The spot is most likely a spec of dust that is on or in the cameras' lens or optical sensor (the sensor is the "film" in digital cameras). Dust is a problem for the SLR type cameras (the kind that have removable lenses) as the camera body is open when swapping lenses. Your camera does not have the ability to accept different lenses - so the chances of dust is minimized - but not impossible. When zooming, the lens extends and creates suction inside. When air is drawn in, a particle of dust was could have been brought in at the same time. Most of the time, dust will vary in appearance from a sharp, irregular shaped object to a fuzzy, rounder object - depending on whether the lens is zoomed in or zoomed out. A professional cleaning should be able clear this problem. Contact a camera shop for an estimate.

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1 Answer

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Go to http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/Main_Page and download the latest firmware for you camera here http://mighty-hoernsche.de/.
It is a supplement to your camera that will open hundreds of possibilities, like making time-lapse recordings, doing your own scripts, shooting RAW,...as well as a feature for removing bad pixels.
All you have to do is to read! Yeah, I know, there are lots of things written :p
More specifically, here is the "how to use badpixel removal" explanation.
http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/Badpixel_removal


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1 Answer

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Hi,

If the dot is not visible in print, but only on the camera's screen, the its only the LCD that is faulty.

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If all else fails, you can try cloning out the spot in an image editor on the computer.

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Sounds like stuck pixels, you really can't fix that. Do some google research if you are curious what a stuck pixel is.

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Sounds like you have a dust spot on the CCD, you should send your camera in for cleaning.

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