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Everything's black We can't see anything at night, even though there's a full moon

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You never said what type of telescope you have.

Put the eyepiece with the LARGEST number written on it into the telescope. This is your LOWEST magnification. DO NOT use the 2x barlow if you have one.

Go outside during the daytime and practice focusing on a distant object.

Posted on Sep 09, 2009

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Is it a full moon to night


No. The last full moon was December 6, 2014 and the next full moon is January 5, 2015. December 22, 2014 is a new moon.

Dec 22, 2014 | Optics

1 Answer

Does the moon have day and night? The same side always faces the earth so does it rotate on its own axis?


Day and night are determined by the sun, not the Earth. It's day when the sun is above the horizon, night when the sun is below the horizon. Even though the same side always faces the Earth, the sun is a different matter.
A lunar day and night is the same as a lunar month.

Nov 17, 2014 | Optics

1 Answer

Why is moon not full all the time in the night sky


The sun lights up half of the moon. Depending on where the moon is in its orbit around the earth, we see anywhere from all of the lit half (full moon) to none of it (new moon).

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lunar_phase

Dec 21, 2013 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

I would like to be able to take a good picture of a full moon on a clear night.


You're going to face two separate problems here.

One, the moon occupies a rather small portion of the night sky. Even fully zoomed in, the moon is going to be not much more than a bright spot in the sky.

Two, the camera is designed to assume that almost every scene is an average brightness. Given how much of the scene is a black sky, the camera will attempt to render the sky as average (what photographers call a "medium gray"). This will result in a picture with a gray sky and a featureless white blob for the moon.

If you think about it, the full moon is nothing more than a really big rock under a midday sun. Thus what you want is the same exposure as when taking a picture on a clear sunny day. Unfortunately the camera is going to be fooled by all that dark sky and try to compensate for it. What you really need is to be able to bypass the camera's light meter and set the proper exposure yourself. The C195, unlike more sophisticated cameras, doesn't allow you to do so. Sorry, but that's just the way it is.

Mar 24, 2013 | Kodak C195 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Can I take clear good pictures of a full moon on a clear night?


You're going to face two separate problems here.

One, the moon occupies a rather small portion of the night sky. Even fully zoomed in, the moon is going to be not much more than a bright spot in the sky.

Two, the camera is designed to assume that almost every scene is an average brightness. Given how much of the scene is a black sky, the camera will attempt to render the sky as average (what photographers call a "medium gray"). This will result in a picture with a gray sky and a featureless white blob for the moon.

If you think about it, the full moon is nothing more than a really big rock under a midday sun. Thus what you want is the same exposure as when taking a picture on a clear sunny day. Unfortunately the camera is going to be fooled by all that dark sky and try to compensate for it. What you really need is to be able to bypass the camera's light meter and set the proper exposure yourself. The C195, unlike more sophisticated cameras, doesn't allow you to do so. Sorry, but that's just the way it is.

Mar 24, 2013 | Kodak Easyshare C195 14 Mega Pixels...

2 Answers

Do i need anything special at night table top telescope i can not see anything


All telescopes have very small fields of view-- it must be pointed directly at the object in the sky or you will not see anything. Simply put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser-- then during the day time practice focusing on a distant object like a building or telephone pole.

The moon should be your first target at night.

Aug 14, 2011 | Bushnell Voyager 78-9470 (470 x 60mm)...

1 Answer

Hi When I try to take pictures of the moon at night, the all I get is bright light without any detail. The sensor seems overloaded and the image seems smudged. I have tried with the intelligent...


All automatic-exposure cameras try to render the scene as a middle gray. The moon is a small portion of the total image, so the camera concentrates on the sky. In trying to get enough light to make the sky go from black to gray, the moon gets completely overexposed. What you want is the moon properly exposed, even if that means the sky goes completely black.

For a full moon, you want the same exposure you would use at noon on a bright day. If you think about it for a moment, it becomes obvious. The full moon is simply a landscape at high noon. Unfortunately, the camera can't know that.

Set the camera to manual. Start with the "Sunny-16 Rule", which tells you to set the aperture to f/16 and the shutter speed to 1/ISO. So for example, set the ISO to 200, the aperture to f/16, and the shutter speed to 1/200. Look at the result on the screen and adjust the exposure as needed.

That was for a full moon. For other phases you may need to add exposure, but the "Sunny-16 Rule" will still give you a starting point.

Jun 18, 2011 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX3 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Everything is black, even when there


Put the eyepiece with the LARGEST number into the telescope. DO NOT USE the 2x barlow.

Go outside during the day and practice focusing on a distant object.

Sep 06, 2009 | Edu-Science (10166) Telescope

2 Answers

How to use telescope at night?


Many people have the same problem-- with these small telescopes you are stuck with seeing only the moon, and several other planets, and maybe a few bright star clusters.

These are all TINY objects (except for the moon).... when you look through the telescope you are looking at a section of sky about the size of your fingertip held at arms length-- the scope must be pointed DIRECTLY at the object. Practice on the moon first-- and then try to find Saturn which is up in the sky right now-- it looks like a dim (slightly yellow) star.

Download a free star chart at www.skymaps.com ---

Apr 01, 2009 | Edu-Science (10166) Telescope

1 Answer

4.5 inch reflector telescope --can't see anything


Try pointing it at the moon first-- with the 20mm and practice focusing it. The moon is up just after dark right now.

Dec 29, 2008 | Bushnell Voyager 78-9470 (470 x 60mm)...

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