Question about Pioneer GM-5200T Car Audio Amplifier

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Amp has power and sound at very low settings only

I have my volume set at about 10 on my headunit, and the base set 0-3 i can feel my 6X9's working, when i start to turn base or volume up, the 6X9's stop working, and go into a popping sound, or working for a moment or two. it worked for a long time before, and i had 2 12's hooked up to it for almost a year, but i dont kno whats wrong now, i know the 6X9's work fine, there also pioneer 330watt

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  • litliceman Dec 08, 2007

    thanks, i checked through the circuit and a random wire was grounding it through the speaker wire, thansk for the help!

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It sounds like you may have a speaker wire shorted to ground. This could trigger the protection circuit. Check all wiring including the area behind the 6x9s to make sure that nothing is shorted to metal/ground. If you can't see any shorts to ground, use an ohm meter to check the wires.

Disconnect the wires from the amp and measure the resistance between the speaker wires and chassis ground. Ideally, they should show infinite resistance. If you read anything other than infinite resistance, trace all wiring to find the short.

Posted on Dec 08, 2007

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My 10" subwoofer is hitting hard but no vibration, why? please help me to fix this issue.


You need a low pass crossover set at 80 hz & below. It will stop the music you hear in the sub. Don't expect the feel of a single 10 in a room to be like the same sub in a car. A car fills with pressure & gives the feel you want. A ported box designed to work with your sub will give you 3db or more output than a sealed box.

Jan 14, 2014 | Alpine SWS-1041 Car Subwoofer

Tip

How to set gain controls on you car audio amplifier


HOW TO SET GAINS

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The ADD version -

1. Play a typically loud music CD in your headunit. Set volume to 75%. Wear ear protection.
2. Starting with the amp gains at their lowest setting, slowly raise one gain at a time until you hear clipping from the corresponding speaker. This will sound like audible distortion.
3. Once you've found the clipping point, back the gain down until you no longer hear the distortion.
4. Repeat for any addt'l gains on the amp/amps.
5. Your new maximum volume setting on the headunit is 75%, never exceed that for happy, healthy speaker life.

(This is the quick & dirty method, it'll get you 80% to proper settings. Read on for the other 20%.)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


How to do things right -

What's gain?
Also known as input sensitivity, gains are the small, typically recessed "volume knobs" on most equipment between the speakers & the headunit. All amps have them, also many EQ's, line output converters, some crossovers.

What's it for?
The idea is to properly match the output from different pieces of gear so that each communicates the cleanest signal to the other, resulting in maximum performance and minimal noise & risk of damage.

Know your enemy - Clipping.
Clipping is the tech term for the distortion that occurs when an amplifier is pushed beyond it's capabilities. In simple terms it sounds like significant distortion of the musical peaks. So for instance a big drum strike will sound muddy or distorted when turned up, but remains clear at a lower volume. That's clipping. What's happening is the amp momentarily runs out of power.

To properly understand this w/o an engineering degree you need to know the difference between constant power (RMS) and peak power. Constant power, very simply, is the amount of juice your amp can produce consistantly. Since there are some standards for measuring this it is one of the few benchmarks we have for amplifiers. But since sound waves are exactly that - waves, with peaks & valleys - understand that an amp's output is never constant, it has to increase & decrease with the music signal.

The amp's "reserve power" is what it uses to deal with the peaks in the music. This is called peak power, or my favorite, headroom. Headroom is typically about twice the RMS power of an amp, but can only be sustained for a few milliseconds before the amp gets totally winded.

So a good way to think of this is a 10 yr old jumping on a bed - that's the music signal. The bed is the amp's RMS power, the ceiling above is the headroom limit. If the kid jumps too high he whacks his head - that's clipping. Do it a couple times & he'll survive. Do it repeatedly & there WILL be permanant damage. This is the single biggest speaker killer out there.

So the object of the game is to adjust the bed height (by using the gains) to the right height so the kid can jump around like a caffeinated monkey without ever whacking into the ceiling. So setting the gains properly allows you to get the amp's maximum output without overtaxing the equipment. With me so far?

A few other basics -
To do this properly you'll need a few things:

Ear protection. Stuff some cotton in your ears if you don't have anything better.

A test CD with a sine wave set to 0db, a 50-80hz stereo tone is ideal. This is important - it's far more accurate than using a music CD. You can purchase these at most any guitar or pro music stores, Amazon, or download a program to make your own. Making your own isn't recommended since there are a lot of variables in computers that can affect the final product.

If you have a crossover, you'll need test tones within the frequency range for each amp. For instance if you have a dedicated sub amp crossed over at 80hz, get a 60hz test tone. For your mains, work with a 120hz tone. If you have a 3-way or more crossover, adjust appropriately, just be sure the test frequency is within the bounds of the speaker range. Test each frequency seperately.

Fader, tone controls, loudness/expansion, etc.
Ideally you'll have the sound from your headunit/EQ completely flat on a normal basis. If so, be sure everything's this way before you test. However, if you KNOW you'll have the bass boost activated, some sort of expansion, or the tone controls preset in some way then go ahead & set them before you test.

Otherwise it's best to have everything flat. If you choose to adjust the tone controls later & leave them that way you can always repeat the process. Regardless, be sure the fader & balance are zeroed out.

Dedicated sub volume controls
A lot of amps have outboard sub volume knobs & headunits frequently have dedicated internal sub volume adjustments. If you plan on using these they should be maxed before setting your gains. If you're not going to use them, best to de-activate them.

Set all amp gains to their lowest point before starting. Usually full counter-clockwise.

Input sensitivity switches
If your amp has a selector switch for different input sensitivities, start by setting it to the highest setting. These are typically expressed in voltages, for example .2-1v, 1-3v, 3-8v. Start with the higher numbers (ex. 3-8v) (lowest sensitivity). If you can't get the amp to clip at those settings, try the next one down until you find the clipping point. You can disregard generally what the markings themselves say since there's no real standard for measuring that stuff. Never trust your system's well-being to those voltage numbers, they're just a guideline best ignored.

Work with one gain at a time.
For example, if you have a L&R gain for your front speakers, you'll be working with each side seperately. If multiple amps, unplug all but the amp you're working with. If a 4+ channel amp, typically you'll have only a single L & R gain, so treat it like a 2 channel. If it has more gains, isolate each & adjust seperately.

Play your test tone thru the headunit. Adjust your headunit volume to 75% of max.
This doesn't need to be precise, just be sure you know where this setting is b/c it's now the HIGHEST you'll ever turn up the volume on the headunit.

(But the amps go to 11...! You're using 75% volume because some CD's will be louder than others. Also b/c there's a small amp in the headunit that will clip if pushed too far. Trust me on this one.)

Now turn up the gain you're working with until you hear the tone quality change - it'll be a distinct change in the tone, there will be distortion. This is where your amp clips. Now turn the gain back down to just below where that distortion occurs. That gain's now set. Repeat for all other gains. Repeat for all other amps.


Final tweaking -
Have an EQ? Want to use the "loudness" button? Want to adjust the bass/mid/treble controls? If you're making minor tweaks (+/-1) there's no real need to worry about gains. If you're talking about bigger changes (+4/-3, etc) you may want to run the tones again to be sure you're still set right.

Also now that the gains are properly set you can adjust them DOWN to balance your system. Need more front volume but don't have a fader? Turn down the rear gains. Sub underpowered? Turn down the mains. The important thing is to never turn them UP from where they are, just down.


A few other notes -

Can't I just use an O-scope or DMM to set gains?
Sure, IF you know the exact output (rarely the rated output) of your amp and you're a freakin' genius with your toys. Generally more accurate & far easier to use your ears.

What about the gains on the EQ/X-over/line-output converter?
Ooh, good question. The general idea here is to follow the same process but use the gains that are the furthest UPSTREAM (I.E. closest to the headunit) and set all the others to their lowest setting. This will send the hottest signal possible thru all the components. Just remember that anywhere the signal splits you'll have to set them there also. For example, if you have a LOC & an outboard crossover you'll need to set gains on both, starting with the LOC. This can get tricky. Let your ears guide you.

What if my headunit says "9v output" and the amp only says "5v input?"
Eh, doesn't really matter. Again, there isn't really any set standard for measuring this stuff & it's usually just marketing. Also remember that music is a wave, not a line, so that rated output is usually a max, not a constant. Just set everything according to the above process, nothing changes.

on Mar 27, 2010 | Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

Fosgate 1500 amp settings


low pass of course set the crossover around 80Hz. Then turn the bass down to around 35% on headunit and the volume all the way up on your head unit just below distortion. slowly turn the amp gain up until you start to hear distortion, then turn it back down until it's completely gone. Then, lower the gain just a little more to make sure you keep out the distortion on all songs. From here you should be good. If the gain is still to high. The adjust to your taste. Just don't move the bass up on the headunit or the gain past your distortion point.

I’m happy to help further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/chris_7f7f91eb941fb23f

May 22, 2012 | Rockford Fosgate Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

Is it possible to hook up 2-6x9 and 2-12in.subs to the 7540a and still pack a nice punch


yes it is however the hookup for it requires something a bit unorthodox

you have 4 outputs (bridgeable)

channel 1 and 2 must be bridged (to lower the ohms) then connected to the 2 6X9 in Parallel..
this must then be set to the high pass frequency (eliminates bass)
lower all the settings as low as possible then turn them up slightly to increase volume to a level where its the hardest and clean sounding..lower volume after

this eliminates the bass and keeps the 6x9 pushing your mid range and high range frequency

now you have 2 channels remaining,, set 3 and 4 to low pass and connect each 12" to an individual channel. (this keeps the bass and ohms high so you will get a clean bass to match with mids and high's. Dont set or bridge for a low bass as it will jam out the 6x9 and your music will sound terrible.

so there u have a simple hookup that will work and keep you sounding clean. remember not to raise the volume on the 6X9 too much as you will blow them..

Mar 29, 2011 | Infinity 7540A Car Audio Amplifier

2 Answers

I have brought these speakers, when i turn the headunit up above about 3 quaters of the way they distort, they are running off a 4 channel 4ohm amp with 400watt rms but they do it with the gain on the amp...


If you run the power amp at a very low setting it makes the amp subject to noise and distortion. You want around a 60% setting.

Speakers also need to have proper loading, that is in a cabinet or enclosure that is kind of matched to them. If the amp is rated at a true 400 Watts RMS then the speakers should be at least 800 Watts as they "cheat" on those SPEAKER ratings and MANY A SPEAKER IS BLOWN AS A RESULT.

Mar 21, 2011 | Cdt Audio HD-53ST Car Component System

1 Answer

JL Amp isn't powering subs and speakers


silly as it sounds, you may want to check your EQ settings on your headunit. Things like sub volume, SLA, loudness and balance. When they replaced your battery, those old settings were lost.

Mar 26, 2010 | Jl Audio 500/1 Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

Volume at 10 produces very low speaker output.!?


It sounds to me that all you are getting is the pre-amp stage of the amp and nothing from the power amp stage. As it is on both channels then it is something that is common to both. This could be something to do with the power supply of the power stage. Or whatever is on the heatsink. It could be that the amp uses a single audio amp IC for both channels. If it does my bet is that it's gone. If it uses two sets of semiconductors for the right & left channel it would be highly unlikely that both channels have gone, but not impossible.

Dec 27, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Powering 4 6x9 speakers, need amp


Hi firstof all your deck isnt really putting out 52 watts x4 more like 17-22w rmsx4 ,companies like to throw out some crazy numbers it seems. If your into Kenwood try out a KAC-8404 4-channel on the mids/highs that will put 50 w x4 rms at 4 ohms or if you wanna go a lil louder try the kenwood x600f that will throw 100w rms on each 6x9 at 4 ohms no problem. My system is very similar to yours but running 4 pioneer 5x7's in all the doors and powering it with the 8404 its loud and clean ,fan cooled and no problems at all. My subs are a pair of 15's soundstream t-4's powered by an Alphasonik pma2500a its throwing 800w rms on each sub running in stereo at 2 ohms.It can drown out the mids if i set it that way but my mids /highs cant take as much power as your kenwoods can or else id step up to the x600f too.

May 10, 2009 | Kenwood KFC-6982ie Car Mid-Range Speaker

1 Answer

SOLID AUDIO F-45 4CH 900W ONE OF THE FRONT CHANNELS ...


HI DUDE TRY TO CONNECT ONLY 2 PC OF UR 6x9 AT FRONT CHANNEL TRY IT OUT COZ IT MAYBE THE DONT HAVE MUCH POWER TO HIT VOLUME OR ELSE TAKE OUT UR SUB CONNECT TO FRONT CHANNEL OR CHECK UR SUB VOLUME .,...

Apr 01, 2009 | Solid Audio Formula Series F45 4-Channel...

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