Question about Olympus Stylus 700 / 700 Digital Camera

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Blur My camera won't focus and I can't seem to solve it. I have changed the ISO levels and nothing works. Please help!

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It may be in macro mode. Check the settings or the buttons on the camera for a little flower icon or "Macro". Try putting the camera into auto mode, and make sure there isn't a flower icon on the display. If there's no sign of macro mode, and you're in auto mode, the lens could be damaged or jammed. This is one persons answer to a jammed lens problem on Yahoo! Answers:

I've had the same thing happen multiple times. Unfortunately I've always had to take the camera into the shop. In two occasions it was cheaper to have it replaced instead of repaired. The lens mechanism jams up and if you keep banging it it can break peices inside. SORRY! :-(

Posted on Dec 04, 2007

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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2 Answers

Blurry pictures of moving wildlife


check shutter speed, problem to slow, increase aperture if light level permits hand shake can also blur image.If in full auto mode change to manual settings mount camera onto tripod THIS WILL SOLVE HAND SHAKE PROBLEMS the most common cause of blurred images.

Nov 22, 2013 | Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM Lens

1 Answer

I am havin Sony Dsc-190 camera, the problem is pictures are not clear and I cnt increase the iso level, so pls help me out.


So the problem here can be many things.
  1. Either the camera is not focusing well
  2. the lens is not clean
  3. there is condensation inside the camera
is it possible if u post an image taken with the camera itself. also try checking if the camera has a master reset just in case u have set something that caused the auto focus to get disabled. like this you will reset the camera and get the auto focus back working.
the iso level will only control the lighting in your camera, so it will enable you to take pictures in darker areas when the iso goes higher. if your camera does not let you control the iso its probably set on auto.
regards

May 12, 2012 | Sony Cameras

2 Answers

I bought this lense and need instant help. I am shooting pics at a high school football game and it gets dark early. What settings do I switch my camera to in order to get sufficient light and capture all...


Shooting sports and the evening can be a compromise between needed s fast shutter to stop action or a longer shutter to allow enough light for a good exposure. Fortunately, you've got a "fast" lens. My suggestions are:

Shoot in "A" mode (aperture priority) and change the aperture of the lens to the lowest number available to make the aperture open to maximum, and increase the ISO to 400 or 800. You may even get satisfactory results at ISO1600, but you should check the results on a computer screen before blindly going out shooting at the level.

By increasing the aperture, two things happen; exposure times are reduced to minimum so that motion is stopped (or blur minimized) and the the depth of field becomes very narrow or "shallow". Depth of field or "DOF" describes the distance in front and beyond the point of focus that will also be in focus. Large apertures (low "f" number s like 1.4 to 2.8 ) = narrow DOF and small apertures (high "f" numbers like 16 to 22 and beyond) = wide DOF. An example would be if you took a picture of someone's face from a2 feet away at f 1.4 and focused on the tip of the nose - the eyes would begin to get soft or out of focus - the ears would be even more noticeable - and that background would very blurred. The same picture at f 22 nearly everything would be in focus - except for maybe the background - depending how far behind it is from the subject's head. Check the example below:

steve_con_4.jpeg
Look at the backgrounds of the pictures above. The left is largely in focus at f 8 while the right is blurry at f 2.5. Had left been shot at f 22 or more, more of the background would be in focus.


Increasing the ISO to 400 or 800 increases the camera's sensitivity to light like film. The higher the ISO, the less time it takes to get a properly exposed picture. High ISO are helpful in low light situations or other times you need to have a faster shutter speed (for sports or don't have a tripod for pictures that need long exposures). Assume you want to take a picture of something that the camera tells you won't be exposed correctly unless you shoot at say for example f 2.8 and shutter is 1/30 second. If the camera ISO was set to 100, you could change it to 200. This doubles the sensitivity to light - meaning you need 1/2 the light; you can change the f number from f 2.8 to f 4, OR, leave it at 2.8 and increase the shutter speed to the next faster value 1/60 sec. If you change the ISO to 400, it is now 4x's sensitive than 100 (or 2x's than 200). At ISO 400, you could go two f stops smaller to f 5.6 or stay at 2.8 and increase shutter from 1/30 to 1/125. For ISO 800, you could go three f stops smaller to f 8 or stay at 2.8 and increase shutter from 1/30 to 1/250. You can mix and match, too. Go one up on the speed and two smaller on the aperture. The drawback to higher ISOs is that the pictures become grainier with each increase. Eventually, the pictures don't look good when you get into ISO numbers above 800 (or less on some DSLR cameras - and even less on point and shoot types). You have to experiment to find where your preferences are. See below for Low and High ISO comparison shots:

steve_con_86.jpg
The left picture above has nice, smooth transitions between shades of colors - the right picture has a grainy appearance called "noise". Some is acceptable but others are not - it depends what YOU can live with. Sometimes it's better to have a grainy shot than nothing at all.

Lastly, you can shoot "S" for shutter mode, to control motion instead of "A" which controls volume of light instead. The same principles apply.

I hope this helps & good luck!

Sep 08, 2011 | Tamron SP AF 70200mm f28 Di LD IF Makro...

1 Answer

Photos are blurred.


Blurred images are caused by several reasons: motion due to camera shake, use of slow shutter speeds and failure of the camera to focus correctly.

Slow shutter speeds

When light is low, wide apertures and slow shutter speeds will be selected automatically by the camera. Most people can't take blur-free, hand-held shots when the shutter speed is under 1/60th of a second.

Cameras that have optical Image Stabilization help but even IS has its limits. Increase room lighting, increase the ISO setting or use a tripod, or use a combination of all three.

Blurred images or misfocus

If an image is blurred due to camera shake, the blur will appear throughout the entire image. If parts of an image are in focus, and others are not, you've misfocused.

Sep 16, 2010 | Cameras

1 Answer

I don't know how to change the iso setting for a sports action photo. Please describe in detail. I have no manual.


For sports action, if you want to freeze the action with minimal blur, set the ISO to a higher number such as 400, or 800. A faster "film speed" will allow the camera to have a quicker shutter speed. If you want to blur the subject to denote motion, pick a slower ISO number and you'll be able to take sports photos with a bit of blur in them for effect! If you need help actually setting the ISO for your camera, please let us know what is the make and model of your camera and we'll fix ya up! K

Jun 07, 2009 | Cameras

1 Answer

Canon SD1000 blurred pictures and blurred LCD, Camera wont focus! please help ive had it for 2 weeks


The best chance to use your SD1000 is to set to picture, push ISO (on top of the func. set ring) and set to hi. This works pretty well. Do not bother sending any camera to Canon, they charge the "standard charge" plus for all their manufacturing problems on all Canon cameras. Definately the worst customer service on the market.

Jul 07, 2008 | Canon PowerShot SD1000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I need advice on how to take Ice-hockey action pics...


Pictures get blurred because of several reasons:

Low shutter speed - occurs in low lightning conditions.
Auto focus not focused - occurs when pressing the shutter button all the way without waiting for the auto focus ready signal (green box)

To speed up the shutter do the following:
In Camera menu-Quality- Set ISO 100 for outdoor, ISO 400 indoor.

To avert focus problems, set camera menu-Rec- Focus-Infinity, Rec-Quick shutter-On

Hope that helps.

Dec 28, 2007 | Casio Exilim EX-S500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

D50, blury pics


Blur can occur if the shutter speed is too low relative to the degree of movement of your subject(s). While the 'sports' mode favors shutter speed and adjusts the focus for moving subjects, you may still need to increase the ISO (I'm not sure the camera does that automatically), or use flash, if feasible.
Alternatively, try panning the camera with your moving subject. This should blur the background, but keep the subject from blurring.
Finally, keep in mind that in sports photography, blur is sometimes a desired outcome that produces a sense of motion in an otherwise static photo.

Hope that helps.

Nov 14, 2007 | Nikon D50 Digital Camera

2 Answers

DSC p72 blurring


Hello Steve, I've bought that very same camera myself, and i feel quite happy with it. I do know what you're refering to since i've dealt with that problem before. About the Blurring "effect", i'm affraid this is due to a lack of focus regulation from you. In this camera it is possible to achieve very good results once you control the Metering and Focus in an accurate way. In other words you'll have to take over the Focus and Metering control regularly. As you may know the Focus Options are (if i'm not mistaken) , infinite, 7m, 3m, 1m, 0.5m, center, multiple. Basically if you're indoors there's no need to use the infinite, center or multiple focus (except in specific situations), which you may keep to outdoor Shots. Indoors, you'll get far better results, intensively using the 0,5m, 1m, 3m or 7m. Hope i didn't put it to much confuse. Summing it up a bit, you'll have to use more often these controls according to each single situation. Please, let me know something wether it worked or not. Regards

Sep 13, 2005 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-P72 Digital Camera

1 Answer

S2 Pro User Questions-Focus Issue


With the camera you have, noise isn't much of an issue when pushing the ISO to 400, 800 or even 1600. Try setting at ISO 400 and change it to manual mode or shutter priority and then choose a faster shutter speed. Take some test shots. If it's still blurred, increase the shutter speed and ISO to 800 and try again.

Sep 04, 2005 | Fuji FinePix S2 Pro Digital Camera

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