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My Nikon is coming up with “n1” where the numbers are displayed and the film won’t wind so I can’t remove it, what do I do?

Posted by Anonymous on

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6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 17 Answers

SOURCE: wind film?

Behind the LCD screen on the back of the camera, is a a gray button marked "R", and a gray slide switch to the immediate left of that.

Press and hold the R button, while sliding the switch to the left, this can be easily done with one thumb. the display will blink 0 and the motor will stop when rewinding is complete.

-John

Posted on Mar 16, 2009

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Steve5
  • 423 Answers

SOURCE: Nikon EM (1979?) Won't wind film, photos don't come out

Not necessarily. The EM has an M90 setting which will fire the shutter at 1/90th of a second. The meter is inactive on this setting. It was put on the EM so that if the batteries fail, you can shoot at 1/90th and take a guess at the exposure. There is also a small button (blue or chrome, depending on the production run) which lights up a red LED if the batteries are good. The light meter doesn't work until the frame counter is at 1 or higher. Before the #1, the shutter will always fire at 1/2000th of a second to speed up the film loading process. You can tell that the meter is working by observing the meter's scale/needle on the inside of the viewfinder. If it is pointing out of the red zone, it's OK to shoot (proper exposure). If the needle is in the red zone (indicating under or over exposure) the camera will "beep" as an audible warning. Check the battery condition first.

Posted on Mar 16, 2009

Gryfox
  • 216 Answers

SOURCE: FILM DOOR WILL NOT OPEN on nikon f2

The F2 has a door knob on the bottom cover. Flip out the handle and rotate it counter clockwise to open.

Posted on Apr 08, 2009

  • 16 Answers

SOURCE: For the first time I used black & white film in my

try inserting the film again.

Posted on May 06, 2009

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My Nikon N60 wont load film. I load the film but it doesnt wind the film, but when i take a picture it rewinds it. I dont know what im doing wrong


Hi. Pay careful attention to the way the end of the film fits through the take-up reel. Open the back (empty) and give the wind knob a few twists. That will tell you which way it is turning. Put the end of your film through the slot in the take-up reel so itd winds onto itself as it advances. There's usually enough extra unexposed wound onto the factory reel that it won't cost you and pix at the end of it. Pull enough out of the cassette to be sure your winding-load position is really going to hold when you advance. Good luck.

Oct 30, 2016 | Nikon N60 35mm SLR Camera

Tip

Stuck Film Advance in Manual or Auto Wind 35mm Cameras


I've been seeing a great number of posts from people requesting help with a stuck film advance feature on their 35mm film cameras (you remember "film", right?) Normally, there are just a couple of things you can try to fix this issue before you'll need to find a professional to repair your camera - if it's even worth it. On that note, a lot of people still have film cameras for nostalgia purposes but there are still some hold outs that enjoy film. Finding a repair shop for an older camera isn't impossible but they are getting scarcer. Google "FILM CAMERA REPAIR" and see what pops up in your area!

MANUAL ADVANCE CAMERAS:

There's a complex number of actions that must work properly in order for you to advance the film in your camera using the manual advance lever. Gears, shafts, bearings and springs come into play and like a clock, they need to mesh together or the advance mechanism comes to a screeching halt. Well, you'll be the only one screeching, most likely but you get the point. If any of those parts break or become unaligned, or if some foreign matter like dust or dirt gets into them, the same thing happens. However, there are sometimes a few things you can try that might prevent you from sending in your camera for professional repair. I caution you about opening your camera yourself unless it has no real value to you because the interior of a 35mm SLR camera is pretty complex, even more so that a clock. Chances are you'll do more bad than good. With that said, try these options:

Film Jammed - Won't Advance
Sometimes the film will jam in the canister, or in rare instances, isn't actually as long as it's supposed to be and can reach the end of the roll before the camera indicates it has. If you suspect this has occurred then push the film release button and try to wind the film back into the canister before opening the camera. If you don't care if the film gets exposed feel free to do this in the light. It's much easier!
At times the film may also pull lose from the canister and roll completely on the take-up reel. If this happens you'll need to take the camera into a completely dark room with the light-proof film container, remove the film manually from your camera, roll the film up and put it into the light-proof container, close it tight and then seal it with electrical or duct tape. Also let the lab know this has happened so they don't pop up the container and expose your film thinking it is still in the canister.

Advance Lever Stuck
If the actual film advance lever is stuck and won't move, about the only option you have is to open the back of the camera and be sure nothing has jammed in the gears or sprockets of the take up reel or film path. If that doesn't fix the problem try pressing the film release button, wind the rewind lever a bit and see if the advance lever engages again.

If the lever just flips back and forth with no tension at all then something inside has broken and your chances of repairing it yourself are almost none. Most film cameras are getting on in years and will just naturally begin to break down over time. There may be no option to even fix your camera unless you find a similar model for parts and send that along to the repair shop. Make sure you get the parts camera back as you may need it later! If you like tinkering and the camera isn't one you'd miss if you couldn't fix it, then you could always give it a shot yourself. You can pick up a set of jeweler's screwdrivers and pliers from the web or Radio Shack for under $20 and find old film cameras on EBay or Craigslist at a decent price. Just be sure they don't have the same problem as your current camera does!

Grinding Noise When Advancing Film
This is most often caused either by a broken part, metal shavings or dirt/debris in the winding mechanism. Again, if you feel comfortable doing it yourself and it's not an expensive collector's model, you can try to repair it yourself. Hunt down a PDF service manual for your camera on the using Google web (a lot of collectors share them) and it should show you how to remove the cover to see the winding mechanism area. Look for debris in the gears and springs and remove it with short blasts of canned air but be sure you hold the camera so any debris falls out and not further into the camera. You can also use Q-tips dipped in alcohol to remove any debris, but don't use water, and let the area dry completely. Once you've done this, you'll need to apply a light lubricant to the area but only if it was lubricated before you cleaned. Use thin white lithium grease or an oil or grease used by clock repair shops and apply it with a toothpick as you don't need much. DON'T USE WD-40! It will do more damage than help.

MANUAL ADVANCE CAMERAS WITH MOTORDRIVE ATTACHMENTS:

These are manual wind cameras like the Minolta X-700 or Nikon FM2 that have an attachable motor drive that winds the film for you. Pretty much the same suggestions previously noted can be tried with a couple of exceptions:
Check the batteries and contacts in the winder making sure they're clean and not bent or broken. You can clean battery contacts with a CLEAN pencil eraser or alcohol and a Q-tip. Blow any dust and debris out of the compartment afterwards.If you still experience problems remove the winder and be sure the coupling that locks into the bottom of the camera to wind the film is not jammed or damaged. With batteries in the winder and the power turned on, look for a series of contacts on the top of the winder that mate with your camera. Be sure these aren't dirty or broken as well. Using a paper clip, you should be able to short one or more of them to another to activate the winder to make sure it works properly.

When All Else Fails - A Bigger Hammer
If none of the previous suggestions work and if, ONLY if you don't value the camera for collector's value a firm tap might work as a last ditch effort. I once had an old Minolta SRT that locked up solid. I didn't want to bother with trying to open it up as I only used it for a shelf display so I took the lens off, used a wad of very clean, soft foam to hold the mirror steady and wacked it twice on the counter. Not enough to damage the camera body (or the counter!) but a good smack. Whatever was jammed came loose and the advanced began to work. As I said, I only use it for display so I don't know if it affected the shutter speeds, etc. but it worked and cost me nothing but time.

AUTO/POWER ADVANCE CAMERAS:

Newer "old" 35mm film cameras used a power winder motor to advance the film and **** the shutter. If you experience a jammed advance on these cameras, check the film path, sprockets and make sure they are clear and move freely, as I described previously. Try the film release button and see if that will release the drive as well. Another option that has worked at times is to remove the film, lens and all batteries from the camera (including any date/time battery) for at least a day or two to see if the camera will reset itself. This worked for me once with a Nikon N70.
As a last ditch effort, the table smack might work as well, but I make no promises and it's all your fault if you damage the camera beyond repair... or your furniture!

on Jan 06, 2015 | Photography

1 Answer

The new roll of film winds into the right spool upon closing back cover // brand new batteries displays 1/2 and ERR appears on led panel


Is the ERR blinking, and is there an additional blinking E on the display? If so, the film is not loaded properly.
The film is supposed to advance all the way to the take-up spool upon loading. The camera then "rewinds" one frame at a time as you take pictures. This way the camera knows exactly how many shots are left on the roll. Also, if the back is accidentally opened, the shots already taken are already in the can and won't be ruined.
If you need a manual, you may download a copy here.
Try cleaning the battery contacts and see whether the battery reads full with no film in the camera.
If problems persists, feel free to reply to this post and give any additional details.

Mar 04, 2012 | Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

The film advance lever is stuck on my Minolta Hi-Matic C. I bought this at a thrift store today to see if it worked. The film advance lever worked fine for a while and then got stuck. Put a new battery...


Have you rewound the film? If you rewind the file completely and pull out the rewind know, it will pop the back open . . . and can remove the film cassette. While the back is still open, complete the cycle on the winding crank. The winding crank should return to "Normal" arter you complete the winding cycle. When you close the back, everything should go back to normal.

Jul 18, 2017 | Minolta Photography

1 Answer

Hi i recently bought a used F3/T. Just ran a 36 exp roll and everything seemed to work fine. However i realized on loading a new roll, that the film counter did not reset. It remains at frame 37. How can i...


This won\'t be easy for you if you don\'t the proper tools, You have to remove the wind lever assy, and the speed dial, Then wind side top cover, Then pull wind base plate assy, And check counter reset lever, to make sure spring didn\'t come loose, Putting the baseplate back on can be fun because of linkage to the wind assy

Sep 29, 2010 | Nikon F3HP 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

FILM DOOR WILL NOT OPEN on nikon f2


The F2 has a door knob on the bottom cover. Flip out the handle and rotate it counter clockwise to open.

Apr 07, 2009 | Nikon Photography

2 Answers

CAN WORKOUT HOW TO OPEN NIKON FE CAMERA


Sept 19th, 2008
On the bottom of the Nikon FE, there is a silver button to push in, and this releases a lock for the film.
Then on the left side, on the top, there is a white arrow and a silver lever tucked in. Wind your film, this it's all the way back in the canister. Then the black lever by the speed film (ASO) numbers, pull that back toward you. This will release the black 3/4" knob upward, and by gently pulling this upward, your door will release and the film canister will be allowed to come out. Just besure to wind your film back in the cansiter, before you open the door, or your photos will be over exposed. Best to do this in a darker area or shaddowed area, just for protection.
Good Luck. I've had mine since the mid 1970's and love it for double exposures and the special filters I have for it. The Hot Shoe for the flash attachment, just burned out on me a couple of days ago.

Mar 02, 2008 | Nikon FE 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

F--


Unlike other cameras that start at frame #1 after loading and count up as the film is used, the N55 advance the film to the last frame during the loading process. When loading is complete, the frame counter stops at the number of available frames on the roll (usually 24 or 36) and counts down as photos are taken. I know it sounds backwards but it actually makes a lot of sense to engineer it this way. After the last photo is taken (displays 1 on the counter), the camera automatically winds the end of the film into the cassette and the counter shows a blinking E. I am assuming that that is what is being displayed and not a blinking F. it it is an F, perhaps there is a problem with the LCD display? If so, it probably isn't worth having it repaired.

Jun 26, 2007 | Nikon N55 35mm Film Camera

2 Answers

Nikon N50 SLR film


Hi: You may want to try changing the aperature setting,or removing the lens,then re-installing the lens. Good luck.

May 29, 2007 | Nikon N50 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

N75 will not load film


Quick solution: force a manual rewind.
1. Remove film
2. Close camera back.
3. With the power turned on, press the two rewind buttons together. They are marked in red.
4. The camera will make a rewind sound and will stop after about 2 seconds.
5. DO NOT fire the shutter yet.
6. Put the mode on Manual and select a fast shutter speed like 1/90 sec. Any aperture will do.
7. Load the film correctly as given in the user's manual.
8. As you close the camera back, the film will prewind to the end of roll. At the end of the roll pre-wind the LCD will show you the total number of frames available.
9. Select any shooting mode.
10. Go on and take pictures.

Hope this helps

Dec 14, 2006 | Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera

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