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Does this computer use socket 7?

Is this a socket 7 board? The "cyrix instead" 250mhz chip uses a very large heatsink and no fan... If I swap to a K6-2 AMD with twice the speed, will I be ahead on performance. It is new and has a small heatsink/fan securely attached.
Will there be a plugin point for the fan, since the present cpu does not have a fan?
BTW, before I replaced the original hard drive with a fast maxtor 20 gb model, the speed was barely tolerable... but now I can run aol, word, antivirus etc. with the doubled memory from stock... Now 128 mb. I plan to spend about 34 with shipping for Edge simms on sale, to max out at 384 MB...

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It would be helpful to have the model# of the board.

If you look on the board itself you can look for a 2 or 3 pronged connector coming off the board that is labeled fan.. Reguardless, if there are any fans in your case already then you can just buy a power splitter ( like this one ) and then hook it up that way.

Posted on Dec 06, 2007

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Can you upgrade the cpu on a Via KT ^00


No Kevin.

AMD's use a different Processor socket, than an Intel does.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_CPU_sockets#List_of_sockets_and_slots

At least when we are talking the era of your motherboard.
(Real old? Like over 20 years ago, or more? AMD's and Intel's used a lot of the same processor sockets)

The designation VIA KT600.

VIA is a Chipset manufacturer.

Chip and Chipset are slang terms for I.C.
Integrated Circuit,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_circuit

VIA KT600 refers to the motherboard chipset.
The Northbridge chip, and the Southbridge chip,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_VIA_chipsets#Slot_A_and_Socket_A

The VIA KT600 motherboard chipset, was manufactured for the AMD Socket 462, (Socket A -> Same/same), and AMD processors.

Intel Pentium 4's used the Socket 478 processor socket, back in the day; then moved to the LGA 775 processor socket. (Socket T)

This is a Motherboard Diagram, that fits the technology of your motherboard,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Motherboard_diagram.svg

CPU = Central Processing Unit.
Another term used is Microprocessor, or simply Processor, for short.
DOES NOT mean Personal Computer.

(If you run into somebody that uses CPU to mean a personal computer -> Slap 'em.



NO, WAIT! Don't! lol!

I can see the headlines now;
"Person slapped for using CPU to mean Personal Computer Perpetrator alleges Joecoolvette of Fixya said to do so." lol!)

This is an example of a Northbridge chip, and Southbridge chip; on a motherboard,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:ASRock_K7VT4A_Pro_Mainboard_Labeled_English.svg

The Northbridge chip has an aluminum finned Heatsink on it, to help disperse the heat the Northbridge chip makes.
Looks a lot like the Southbridge chip, with the Heatsink removed from it.
Some motherboards do have a Heatsink, on the Southbridge too.

Your line of question makes me want to post some links, to more computer information for you.
Basic info for now. We all have to start somewhere,

http://computer.howstuffworks.com/

Scroll down to the subheading in Orange(?) -
What's Inside: Computer
Click on, one at a time; the subheadings;

1) Computer Hardware
2) Computer Peripherals
3) Computer Security
4) Computer Software
5) Internet

Click on the various subheadings in each category, for more information on that subject.

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/

Click on each heading one at a time, at the Top;

A) Case: (Computer case)
B) Cooling
C) CPU (Processor)
D) Input
E) Memory
F) Mobile
G) Motherboard
,and so on.

Basic info up to technical info.

Plus always come back, and see us here.

For additional questions please post in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Jan 02, 2013 | ASUS KT600 Motherboard for AMD Socket A...

1 Answer

Its makes my pentium 4 go to 136 C, the temp rises in a matter of minuets! no other motherboard does this, and no settings have been changed! please help!


Are you sure the reported temperature is correct? How are you getting this indication? Is it through the Hardware monitoring in the bios, where the system would be under little load?

Have you checked that the heatsink is getting that hot? 136 degrees c is enough to blow the chip and I would have thought the computer would have shut down. placing your hand near the heatsink should tell you if its getting hot even without touching it

I would be inclined to download a hardware monitoring programme that will confirm the temps that you appear to be getting. If the chip is not running that hot it may be a faulty sensor.

To help resolve this, I would reset my bios to the defaults to eliminate that area first, then check my heatsink and fan to clean any dirt or dust build up. I would also try another chip to see if the same problem occurs. It COULD be a faulty chip

If the above produce no results, and your motherboard is set to defaults, then I would seriously consider swapping out the board.

I don't know what cooling fan and sink you are using but the Precott P4's used to generate a lot of heat and ran ay 75 degrees on a standard cooler, certainly recommend a copper bottomed or Arcic cooler pro type

Dec 30, 2010 | HP Asus Motherboard P4SD-LA Socket 478...

1 Answer

I don't know technical terms but there is a 4screw x that holds the sink to the mother board just to the right of the x is a small square over a chip is the square super to have a pad on it or no pad and...


Let me see if I can decipher what you have stated killa_klowns, and offer a solution.

1) The Processor has a Heatsink on it, or a Heatsink/Fan combo. Depends on what the computer manufacturer designer wanted to implement.

{Some computers have a Heatsink/Fan combo sitting on the Processor.
Other computers just have a Heatsink sitting on the Processor, and air is provided by a Front computer case fan pushing air through a plastic cover onto the Heatsink}

Typical design for a Heatsink/Fan combo (Stock design. LGA 775 processor socket. Also, not a gamer type of rig),

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=5205492&CatId=493

Photos showing typical Intel Pentium 4 processors. Shows the top of the Processor's case that the Heatsink sits on,

http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Pentium_4/Intel-Pentium%204%203.0%20GHz%20-%20RK80546PG0801M%20%28BX80546PG3000E%29.html

Where the headings state > Specifications - Pictures (5) - CPU ID (1) - Comments (15),
click on Pictures (5)

Thermal Paste should be used on the top of a Processor's case.
If there is a Thermal Pad, take it off, and fly it at the cat.
They're JUNK!

[ Always Thoroughly clean the top of a Processor's case, and the bottom of the Heatsink, before applying fresh new Thermal Paste. Same thing for every chipset.

> Observe Anti-Static Precautions A Processor is the most susceptible hardware component to Static shock.

Use a plastic scraper to clean the top of the Processor's case, and the bottom of the Heatsink.
I use an old credit card.

Then use Q-tips dipped in Isopropyl Alcohol (Rubbing alcohol) to clean the top of the Processor's case, and the bottom of the Heatsink.
May take several Q-tips dipped in alcohol. Usually a gooey mess.

CAUTION!!
Isopropyl Alcohol is EXTREMELY FLAMMABLE!
Use in a Well ventilated area with No sparks or flames present ]


The next chipset in line to use a Heatsink is a Northbridge chipset.
Termed Northbridge, for one, because in relation to how it is sitting on the motherboard, it is to the North of the motherboard.

On the motherboard the Northridge chip sits below the Processor.

The Northbridge chip may, or may Not have clips which hold the Heatsink on.
When no clips are used, > Thermal Glue is used to hold the Heatsink on.

{The motherboard chipset is the Northbridge chip, and the Southbridge chip.
Note* This info does Not apply to motherboards that support the Intel Core i3, i5, i7, or i9 processors}

The Super I/O chipset does Not use a heatsink.

Motherboard diagram,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Motherboard_diagram.svg }

Tell me what the motherboard manufacturer name, and Model Number is, and I can give you more detailed info about that motherboard.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Dec 04, 2010 | Sunon (16-02-006) Fan Kit

1 Answer

Nvidia 8600gt 512 MB chipset is not working in my DV9700t HP pavallion laptop. Same model is not sold here so HP autorised service centre could not repair it, also this laptop was not having world wide...


The Nvidia GeForce 8600M GT chipset isn't the problem. It's the cooling system.

The cooling system is inadequate. It cannot cool the Processor, AND the Nvidia GeForce 8600M GT chipset properly.

HP knows this.

When the Nvidia GeForce 8600M GT chipset overheats, it comes loose from it's motherboard mounting.

The method of mounting the 8600M GT is connected in a BGA mount.
Ball Grid Array.

To explain:
A) Chip and Chipset are slang terms for I.C. Integrated Circuit.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_circuit

B) GPU = Graphics Processing Unit

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPU

The GPU is mounted on a small circuit board, and then the circuit board has a method of mounting to the motherboard.

With a Processor, the chipset is also mounted on a small circuit board. On the bottom of the circuit board are pins. These pins go down into socket holes in the processor socket.
(Or you have Processors with the socket holes, and the processor socket has the pins)

Instead of pins for mounting, there are round solder balls on the bottom of the small circuit board.
On the motherboard area that the circuit board is to be mounted to, there are a matching number of copper pads.
(We are talking REAL SMALL here. Copper pads about the size of a straight pin head, solder balls about twice the size of this period >. )

The circuit board with it's solder balls, is set into position on the motherboard with it's copper pads.
Heat is used to melt the solder balls, and they solder to the copper pads.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ball_grid_array

The cooling system in the HP Pavilion dv9700t Notebook PC (Laptop) consists of a Fan/Heatsink Assembly.

The fan draws air up from the bottom, and pushes air through the fins of the Heatsink.
The Heatsink is attached to a long copper tube.
The copper tube has two flat copper plates on it.

One copper plate sits on top of the Processor's case.
The other copper plate sits on top the GPU chip.

Heat is drawn from the Processor, and from the GPU chip to the copper plates. The heat is then transferred to the copper tube, and then to the Heatsink.

It's a POOR design.

NOT having worldwide warranty? Oh?

Watch the entire video. Also states a method to fix the problem.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnkQNmKauEc

Nov 19, 2010 | HP Pavilion dv9000z Notebook

1 Answer

About mainboard or motherboard


Sometimes. Both the Pentium, Pentium II, many AMD, and some Cyrix processors used a socket 7. So depending on your motherboard and what two processors you are using it may work.

May 23, 2009 | Intel PENTIUM-4 865GV CHIP MOTHER BOARD...

1 Answer

Looking for cpu fan or combo heatsink for a foxconn mother board


CPU heatsink/fans are usually sold as a unit at Newegg.com, tiger.com as well as al other computer supply places. Fan and heatsink are specific and  must match CPU and socket.  

Jan 17, 2009 | Coolmax CPU Fans CPU Fan

2 Answers

Trouble shooting


OC failure = over clocking failure. Make sure the CPU fan is clean, free from dirt & dust. Check CPU fan plug is connected correctly. If the CPU fan still stops after a few seconds replace the CPU fan.
It's harder to find just a fan to fit your heatsink, which sits on your CPU. It is easier to find a new heatsink \ fan combo for your Intel. Use your manual to find what Intel chip is on your board. Use that information & search google for a heatsink & fan combo. Pay close attention to how your current heatsink is mounted to the Gigabyte board.

Mike

Mar 24, 2008 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Toshiba laptop fan


remove all the screws underneath first then gently seperate.

Sep 21, 2007 | Toshiba Satellite P35-S611 Notebook

1 Answer

ASUS NCT-d


Hi, have you tried removing the CPU and using a Air Jet Spray can to clean all contact pins and pin holes? The problem sounds like a loose chip. So also check all on board chips are seated, including RAM chips. Air spray can be bought from most Computer stores. Goodluck mistyman

Sep 09, 2007 | ASUS NCT-D (90MSV430G0UAY) Motherboard

2 Answers

Motherbooard for Compaq Presario sr1050nx


A7 indicates that it is a K7 series - a socket 462. Socket 7's were for the old Pentium 1's and AMD K5, and K6 I,II, and III series of pre-athalon processors. Socket 7 was also the last socket to see Cyrix chips.

Oct 15, 2006 | Compaq Presario SR1050NX (DW257A) PC...

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