Question about Sony KV-32S26 32" TV

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Won't Turn On

Just picked it up from the side of the road. No surprise it doesn't turn on. I realize it could be a plethora of problems but we want to start with replacing the power system. What parts do we need and how can we get them? Thanks!!

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  • 2ndhandcash Dec 08, 2007

    I have the same Tv with the same problem. I know that both 2sc4834 are dead, along with the resistor. I cannot find the Horizontal IC with that number, is it on the same board? I have not been successful on finding a service manual for this model.



    Thanks!

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I had problems with same unit turning on and then shutting down full power cut out and then it would sometimes work fine for hours.
Some components soldered in Mex. and some boards soldered in other 3rd world manufacturers, depending on problems, it may be just a bad joint on one pin on a vid board or other board.
Total power shutdown caused by bad solder joints on main power supply transformer, resoldered and it has not missed a beat in 10 years.
Dooch

Posted on Dec 11, 2007

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REQUIRES carefull, meticulous soldering of horiz drive circuit
before replacing four parts or it will blow again...........
Parts list.......
Horiz output = 2SC5148 Use OEM or equiv....NO generics...
use 237470 RCA or very expensive SONY or
if it is 2SC4927, use first quality only = measure
Base to emitter LESS than 50 ohms.....

two converter transistors = 2SC4834 generic ok

one .1 ohm resistor R607................

Purchase from TV shop or electronic parts supply........T. know..................

Posted on Dec 05, 2007

  • Vista Electronics Dec 05, 2007

    Ps resistor can be half watt or one watt...........

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Tip

The recent rain storms reminded of a driving tip I wanted to share. It's about...


The recent rain storms reminded of a driving tip I wanted to share. It's about hydroplaning.

The average driver, the one daydreaming, or half asleep, or putting on makeup, or engrossed in NPR, will be taken by surprise when the car suddenly accelerates as it enters into the hydroplane. Yes that's right. It goes faster. And rather fast…um…I mean rather suddenly.

When water settles on roadways, and you come barreling down the highway with limited visibility (hopefully your lights are on), in order for the tires of your vehicle to maintain contact with the road, the tires must displace the water. Like parting the red sea. This task is handled by the tire's treads, if they're not worn. If the treads on the tires are worn, the water will stay right where it is -- as a layer between the wheels of your car and the road. Not good.

When water becomes your new road, the vehicle will “hydroplane”. Similar to water skiing but without an engine and a screaming child in the back seat. And that doesn’t leave much traction for the tires. The lack of traction between the tires and the road decreases the amount of drag (or resistance) therefore the vehicle gains forward momentum.

Here’s how that plays out. You’re bee bopping’ down the road in the rain and hating your boss for making you drive into the office when you could have easily worked from home, and your tires loose contact with the road surface and you and your trusty vehicle go gliding across a sheet of water like an olympic figure skater. If you’re lucky, the vehicle will continue moving in the same direction and with the front of the vehicle leading the way. If you’re not so lucky, the back of your car will be leading the way, then the front, then the back, then the front, then…

If this ever happens to you, NEVER, NEVER, step on the brakes. Why? Because stepping on the brakes will prevent the tires from rolling. If the tires aren’t rolling, but the vehicle is still moving, then there is no possibility of the tires regaining their traction. With hydroplaning, you have a big hunk of out of control useless mechanical energy parting the waters as it spins along the interstate at high speed. With you in it. Getting dizzy.

What you should do is remove your feet from the gas and the brake pedals. Hold the steering wheel firmly as your vehicle initially picks up speed. Your job at this point is to try and keep the vehicle heading in the same direction as before the hydroplaning began. You do this by turning the wheel ONLY if the car begins to turn first. You want to turn the wheel in the direction the back of the vehicle is moving. Basically, that translates into turning the wheel in the opposite direction of which the car wants to spin. Turn the wheel just enough to compensate for the vehicle wanting to spin/turn. This helps to keep the tires in line with the path of travel.

As the vehicle turns to the left, you turn the wheel to the right. Then as the vehicle changes direction and begins to turn to the right, you turn the wheel to the left. These movements will be large at first, but with each turn they should become smaller and smaller until the vehicle comes to a complete stop, or until the tires regain traction with the road surface.

If the vehicle stops completely before you regain control, you could be facing any direction. If you haven’t collided with any other vehicles, calmly and quickly restart the engine if it stopped, and continue driving. Don’t sit there waiting for someone to come crashing into you. If you need to do so, drive your car to the side of the road to regain your composure but do it quickly.

If the vehicle doesn’t stop, but instead you gain control, then just keep on going as though nothing happened.

Happy Trails,
Randy

on May 02, 2010 | Computers & Internet

Tip

Rain Rain Go Away?I Need to Drive Today


It has only been a day or so, but it feel like it has been raining here since God was a child. I have a few friends who will be out driving in it, and I was reminded of a driving tip I wanted to share. It's about hydroplaning.

The driver, you know, the one daydreaming, or half asleep, putting on makeup, and is listening to the rain drops on the roof of the car, or engrossed in NPR, will be taken by surprise when the car suddenly picks up speed as it enters into the hydroplane. Yes that's right. It goes faster. And rather fast…um…I mean rather suddenly.

When water collects on roadways during a downpour, and you come barreling down the highway with limited visibility (hopefully your lights are on), in order for the tires of your vehicle to remain in contact with the surface of the road, the tires need to push the water aside in order to plow through. Like parting the red sea. If the threads on the tires are worn, there’s a good possibility the water will stay right where it is. This leaves a thin layer of water between the wheels of your car and the surface of the road. When this occurs, the vehicle will “hydroplane”. Meaning that a flat layer of water is your new road. And that doesn’t leave much traction for the tires. The lack of traction between the tires and the road decreases the amount of drag (or resistance) so the vehicle gains forward momentum.

Here’s how that plays out. You’re bee bopping’ down the road in the rain and hating your boss for making you drive into the office when you could have easily worked from home, and your tires loose contact with the road surface and you and your trusty vehicle go gliding across a sheet of water like an olympic figure skater. If you’re lucky, the vehicle will continue moving in the same direction and with the front of the vehicle leading the way. If you’re not so lucky, the back of your car will be leading the way, then the front, then the back, then the front, then…

If this ever happens to you, NEVER, NEVER, step on the brakes. Why? Because stepping on the brakes will prevent the tires from rolling. If the tires aren’t rolling, but the vehicle is still moving, then you are skidding. And that’s almost like hydroplaning. Except with skidding, you have more friction. With friction, you have more traction. With traction, you have control. With hydroplaning, you have a big hunk of out of control useless mechanical energy parting the waters as it spins along the interstate at high speed. With you in it. Getting dizzy.

What you should do is remove your feet from the gas and the brake pedals. Hold the steering wheel firmly as your vehicle initially picks up speed. Your job at this point is to try and keep the vehicle heading in the same direction as before the hydroplaning began. You do this by turning the wheel ONLY if the car begins to turn first. You want to turn the wheel in the direction the back of the vehicle is moving. Basically, that translates into turning the wheel in the opposite direction of which the car wants to spin. Turn the wheel just enough to compensate for the vehicle wanting to spin/turn.

As the vehicle turns to the left, you turn the wheel to the right. Then as the vehicle changes direction and begins to turn to the right, you turn the wheel to the left. These movements will be large at first, but with each turn they should become smaller and smaller until the vehicle comes to a complete stop, or until the tires regain traction with the road surface.

If the vehicle stops completely before you regain control, you could be facing any direction. If you haven’t collided with any other vehicles, calmly and quickly restart the engine if it stopped, and continue driving. Don’t sit there waiting for someone to come crashing into you. If you need to do so, drive your car to the side of the road to regain your composure but do it quickly.

If the vehicle doesn’t stop, but instead you gain control, then just keep on going as though nothing happened.

Happy Trails,
Randy

on Apr 12, 2010 | Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

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