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Taking pictures outside at night

I my night photos always turn out nearly black. Particularly those of the moon and fires. What do I need to do to get good pictures at night?

Thank you.

eddie stinson

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There are so many solutions to this I barely know where to begin.

First, set the Dial to M, then on the multimode (round) button, push on the left side to bring the exposure time up. For night shots I find that F2.7 and any time of 1" or more yields fairly good shots.

You should see the change in the view finder, or the lcd if you're one to use that.

Posted on Dec 06, 2007


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How to shoot pictures of the moon

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How to photograph the supermoon: an easy way to shoot moon ...
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4 days ago - Taking pictures of the moon is one of the more popular subjects in night photography - but it's also quite tricky to get right. Use this tried and ...

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Jun 11, 2015 - Aperture: Set your aperture to f/11. Shutter Speed: Set your shutter speed to 1/125 on cameras with base ISO 100, and to 1/250 on Nikon DSLRs with base ISO 200. Lens Focus: Set your lens to manual focus (either through a switch on the lens or on the camera) and set your focus to infinity.

How To Take Stunning Pictures Of The (Super) Moon :: Digital Photo ...
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Aug 7, 2014 - Start with ISO 200, f11 aperture and 1/125 second. Try a test shot. Then use trial and error by changing the shutter speed until you can find the best exposure that works for your composition without overexposing the moon. Turn off auto focus.

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Nov 15, 2016 | Cameras

1 Answer

Night Photography

Wait until the sun goes down.

In many ways night photography is just like day photography, except there's less light. With less light, you need a slower shutter speed, a wider aperture, a faster ISO, or a combination of all three. Or else you need to add light.

Just like day photography, the best camera settings (and other things) depend on what you want the photograph to say to the viewer.

You can add light by using the flash, car headlights, etc. The flash doesn't have much range; if you're sitting in the stands at a night sporting event your flash isn't going to affect any pictures you take of the action on the field. Another effect of the short range is that if you take a flash picture of a person at night, you're likely to have an almost completely black background. If you want something of the background to show, use the Night Portrait mode (and a tripod).

If you want to take a picture of a night landscape (or the night sky, with star trails) then turn off the flash. Put the camera on a tripod or other steady support and use a slow shutter speed.

If you're taking a picture of the full moon, then it's not night photography at all. The full moon is just a big rock under a midday sun, so treat it as such.

Nov 22, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Night Pictures

make this test .God bless you

When troubleshooting problems with your photographs, you need to be able to distinguish between problems created by the camera and problems created by the, ahem, photographer. Some things, like a finger over half of the shot or a totally out of focus picture of your own feet are not camera malfunctions. Fortunately, most of what appear to be "malfunctions" are things you can correct through settings. Blurry pictures usually result in pressing the shutter button down before the autofocus kicks in; half-tap the shutter to bring the camera into focus then press it all the way down to take a clear shot. Grainy photos are the result of a high ISO value and low light; use a tripod or, if necessary, the flash when taking pictures in low light. Different makes and models have different ways to warn you that the light is low: some display a shaking hand icon, others a red light. Look for this and adjust photo settings.

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I would like to be able to take a good picture of a full moon on a clear night.

You're going to face two separate problems here.

One, the moon occupies a rather small portion of the night sky. Even fully zoomed in, the moon is going to be not much more than a bright spot in the sky.

Two, the camera is designed to assume that almost every scene is an average brightness. Given how much of the scene is a black sky, the camera will attempt to render the sky as average (what photographers call a "medium gray"). This will result in a picture with a gray sky and a featureless white blob for the moon.

If you think about it, the full moon is nothing more than a really big rock under a midday sun. Thus what you want is the same exposure as when taking a picture on a clear sunny day. Unfortunately the camera is going to be fooled by all that dark sky and try to compensate for it. What you really need is to be able to bypass the camera's light meter and set the proper exposure yourself. The C195, unlike more sophisticated cameras, doesn't allow you to do so. Sorry, but that's just the way it is.

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1 Answer

How do i take picture of the moon

I assume you want a picture of the moon and don't particularly care what the sky looks like.
Consider a full moon. Just what are you taking a picture of? It's a landscape, right? Mountains, craters, etc. All under a bright midday sun without a cloud in the sky (the sky on the moon, not your sky). So what if the moon's a quarter of a million miles away from you, it's under the same sun. Yeah, it's a quarter of a million miles farther from the sun, but given the nearly one hundred million miles between the earth and the sun, the difference is negligible.
There's an old photography rule called the "Sunny-16 Rule." It says that the proper exposure under sunny conditions is f/16 at a shutter speed that is a reciprocal of the film's ISO rating. So, at ISO 200 the proper exposure would be f/16 at 1/200 second (or equivalent, such as f/11 at 1/400 second). You'll have to switch the camera to the Manual exposure mode to do this. Ignore anything the camera's light meter says.
Use this as a starting guideline. Take a picture and review it on the screen. Don't worry about the sky going pure black. You don't want the highlights to get blown out, or the moon will look like a white blob.

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I live in the Florida Keys and going to try and take some photos of the supper moon tonight. What settings do you suggest for a Sony SLT-A55V. I tried to use my longer lens last night without a tripod...

Take you camera off the automatic exposure setting. Left to itself, the camera will try to make the black sky a middle gray. You want to treat the moon as a landscape under noon sun. If you think about it, that's all it is. The moon is simply a large rock or mountain, lit by the same sun you get at noon. This is where the "Sunny-16" rule comes in. The proper exposure for a full moon is an aperture of f/16 and a shutter speed of 1/ISO. For example, if your ISO is set for 200, the shutter speed should be about 1/200 second. Any equivalent exposure will work as well, for example f/11 at 1/400. You can then review the picture on your display and adjust accordingly. The sky will go pure black, but that's okay. You're not taking a picture of the sky, but of the moon.

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1 Answer

I'm having Kodak C190 digital camera. I'm facing certain problems which are as follows:- 1. My camera is not able to capture photo of moon even in night mode. it becomes totally blurt. 2. which one of them...

Pictures of the moon require a tripod. Night mode is a good starting place. After taking a test picture, if the moon seems too bright, you need to set the "exposure compensation" to the next lower number. Take another test photo and adjust as necessary one way or another. After you get a successful photo, you will need to crop it a lot to get the moon large enough.

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I have a canon powershot SD850. I'm having

Turn the dial to SCN, then use the right/left to select night scene.

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Night pictures do not come out

To take night photo's you need to use a tripod. this will enable you to take long exposures without the blur. If you use flash it will only illuminate objects near the camera.

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Hi! It's weird that 1/2 of your photos were too dark. You didn't mention about the flash. Eventhough it is on auto mode, at night you still need to turn on the flash manually. Normally, it is a curve arrow pointing downward, you need to point your mode selector there. What brand of camera are you using though?

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