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In Cooling mode, the blower will not start up

In Cooling (A/C) mode, the blower will not start up after the thermostat starts up the condenser unit (outside).

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There is probably a 'fan switch' which is a thermostat basically, that will switch it on, start there.

Posted on Aug 02, 2009

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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3 Answers

My Goodman heat pump doesn't blow air through the vents into the house, but the fan comes on when the thermostat is turn on for the air conditioning


Check first that
  • the air conditioning equipment is turned on,
  • the thermostat is calling for cooling, and that
  • the blower unit or air handler is actually blowing air through the ductwork.
Here are the details of what to check in what order if your air condtioner or heat pump doesn't start at all when you set the room thermostat to call for cooling:
  1. Check the Room Thermostat Temperature Setting: Set the thermostat to at least 5 degrees below room temperature. Our elderly mom has no patience with switches and controls. She regularly calls her air conditioning service company with a service request, sometimes late at night, because she has simply failed to set the temperature on the thermostat lower than the room temperature. Don't drive your A/C like our mother.
  2. Check that the Room Thermostat is set to "Cool" not "Off" or "Heat". If the thermostat is not set to "cool" it is simply turning off your A/C. If the thermostat display is blank then it's not receiving power (for modern digital thermostats). Check that electrical power is on at the air handler and to the the low-voltage transformer that supplies power to the thermostat.

    If the thermostat has power, check that when you set the thermostat temperature down at least 5 degrees below room temperature the thermostat calls for cooling. If it doesn't then check for broken or shorted thermostat wires anywhere between the wall thermostat and the control board at the air handler.

    You can easily eliminate possible thermostat problems as a cause of failure of the air conditioner to start by simply eliminating the thermostat from the picture: disconnect the thermostat wires at the blower unit's control board and instead connect the two thermostat terminals directly together with a jumper wire. If the system starts then the problem is in the thermostat itself or in its wiring.

    If the thermostat is working but the compressor condenser unit won't start, you could skip ahead
    to COMPRESSOR / CONDENSER DIAGNOSTICS but I wish you'd double check the remaining steps in this article first because there are some sneaky snafus listed below that might still be the problem.

  3. Check that electricity is on for the equipment. Check all of the electrical switches and controls that can turn electrical power off at the indoor air handler or at the outdoor compressor/condenser unit. There are more of these switches than you might guess. Here's a list of what to check:

    Electrical power switches and service switches outside by the compressor, inside at the air handler, and fuses or circuit breakers in the electrical panel. Don't forget to check that the access covers to the equipment are properly closed and latched. Otherwise a
    BLOWER DOOR SAFETY SWITCH could be keeping the equipment from running.

    There are several other safety switches and controls, both manual and automatic that can leave an air conditioner or heat pump turned "off" such as a blower compartment door interlock safety switch, an electric motor overload or overheat switches, and a condensate tray spillage detector switch.

    Some hard-to-find electrical switches on an air conditioner or heat pump could be keeping your air conditioner from starting, such as
    a FLOAT SWITCH on Condensate Tray that could
    be
    causing CONDENSATE PAN SWITCH LOCKOUT - condensate spilling into an overflow pan that uses a sensor switch can be enough to shut down your air conditioner.
    or
    a blower MOTOR OVERLOAD RESET SWITCH could be keeping a fan motor from starting.

    A bad or failed starter capacitor could also be leaving your system shut down, failing to start a blower, fan, or compressor motor.
    See CAPACITORS for HARD STARTING MOTORS

    Watch out: See A/C - HEAT PUMP CONTROLS & SWITCHES to be sure you have found and checked everymanual or automatic electrical switch on the system.
  4. Check the electrical supply voltage. Even if electricity is on, if the supply voltage has fallen too far below the operating voltage range of your air conditioner it's likely that the system will not operate, particlarly, you may note that the compressor motor won't start.
    See VOLTS MEASUREMENT METHODS

Aug 22, 2017 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

Tip

Thermostat wiring terminals and colors


R - The R terminal is the power for the thermostat. This comes from the transformer usually located in the blower section for split systems but you may find the transformer in the condensing unit. For this reason, it is a good idea to kill the power at the condensing unit and the blower section before changing or working on the wiring at the thermostat. If you have a package unit then the transformer is in the package unit.
Red for the R terminal.

RC - The RC terminal is designated for the power for cooling. Some HVAC systems use two transformers. A transformer for cooling and a transformer for heating. In this case the power from the transformer in the blower section would go to the thermostat terminal. It should be noted that a jumper can be installed between RC and RH for a heating and cooling system equipped with a single transformer.
Red for RC terminal.

RH - The RH terminal is designated for the power for heating. See RC above for an explanation. It should be noted that a jumper can be installed between RC and RH for a heating and cooling system equipped with a single transformer.

Y - This is the terminal for cooling or air conditioning and goes to the compressor relay. Typically a thermostat wire pull is made to the air handler on split systems and then this wire is spliced for the separate wire pull which is made to the condenser. Some manufacturers put a terminal board strip near the control board in the air handler so a splice is not needed.
Yellow for Y Terminal.

Y2 - This is the thermostat terminal for cooling second stage if your system is so equipped. Many systems only have a single compressor but if you have two compressors which should only operate off of one thermostat then you need the Y2 thermostat terminal for second stage cooling.
*The most common color I've seen used for this terminal and wire designation is light blue but this varies and is completely up to the installer what color to use. Most installers use the color coding as noted but be aware that some do not use the thermostat color coding.

W - This is the thermostat terminal for heating. This wire should go directly to the heating source whether it be a gas or oil furnace, electric furnace, or boiler,
White for W Terminal.

W2 - This is the thermostat terminal used for second stage heat. There are gas furnaces with low fire and high fire and some depend on control from a two-stage heating thermostat with a W2 terminal. Heat Pumps use staging for auxiliary heat and need a W2 terminal.
*The most common color I've seen used for this terminal and wire designation is brown but this varies and is completely up to the installer what color to use.

G - This is the thermostat terminal used for the fan relay to energize the indoor blower fan. On a split system the blower fan is in the blower section while with a package unit the blower fan is in the outdoor package unit.

Green for G Terminal.

C - This is the thermostat terminal which originates from the transformer and is necessary to complete the 24 volts power circuit in the thermostat but only if the thermostat consumes electricity for power. Many digital thermostats require 24 volts for power so the common wire is necessary.
C stands for common and there is no universal color used for this terminal although black is the most common color I've seen.

O or B - These thermostat terminals are for heat pumps and the B thermostat terminal is used on for Rheem or Ruud and any manufacturer that energizes the reversing valve in heating mode for the heat pump. Most other manufacturers of heat pumps will utilize the reversing valve for cooling and the O thermostat terminal will be utilized for this purpose. This wire goes to outside heat pump condenser where the reversing valve is located.

Orange for O and Dark Blue for B depending on the installer of the heat pump and the manufacturer. If you have a Trane, Carrier, Goodman, Lennox, Ducane, Heil, Fedders, Amana, Janitrol, or any other manufacturer other than Rheem or Ruud you will be utilizing the orange wire for reversing valve. Rheem and Ruud will usually utilize the blue wire for reversing valve.

E - This thermostat terminal is for heat pumps and stands for Emergency Heating. If for whatever reason the heat pump condenser fails and it is necessary to run the heat there is an option on heat pump thermostats for emergency heating. Basically this simply utilizes the back-up heat source many heat pumps have to heat the home without sending a signal to the condenser to run for heat.

E - There is no universal color used for this thermostat terminal designation but this should be wired directly to the heating relay or the E terminal on a terminal strip board in the air handler or package unit if you have a heat pump package unit.

X or Aux - This thermostat terminal is for back-up on a heat pump and allows for auxiliary heating from the back-up heat source usually located in the air handler.

X or Aux - There is no universal color used for this thermostat terminal designation but this should be wired directly to the heating relay or the Aux terminal on a terminal strip board in the air handler or package unit if you have a heat pump package unit.

S1 & S2 or Outdoor 1 and Outdoor 2 - Some thermostats have this terminal and it used for an outdoor temperature sensor. The wire uses for this should be special shielded wire and completely separate form the other thermostat wires.







on Jun 06, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

My blower on my carrier furnace unit won't turn off? a/c or heater doen't turn on.


gas furnace??? check the start capacitor, put unit in ac mode and see if fan comes on(switch fan to on at thermostat) if it does not a fan problem or capacitor problem. when in cooling mode thermostat controls fan, when in heating mode, furnace controls fan

Feb 18, 2015 | Carrier Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Honeywell tstat not working in auto cool mode


so with system setting cool/ fan setting auto, the condenser runs but the indoor blower does Not? but when system setting cool /fan setting on, the condenser runs and the blower runs?

Oct 25, 2017 | Honeywell Electronic Programmable...

1 Answer

My split air conditioner,s compressor is not starting , whtat to do?


Check for obvious things like a blown fuse or open service switch near the condenser unit (the outside part). Make sure that power (most of these are 240V) is available to the unit. Please, do not work on live electrical equipment unless you are 100% sure of what you are doing. You don't get a second chance at these voltages.

On the thermostat, make sure the mode switch is set for cooling, the fan switch is set to on or auto and the temperature set point is set below the current room temperature. If a programmable type thermostat, make sure the time, date, and program are correct; or override to manual mode so that your settings are followed. Check the air handler to make sure that filters are not clogged with dust and dirt - if they are the unit may have iced over the cooling coils. If this has happened, replace the filters and allow time for the ice to melt off the coils. Many air handlers have large, shallow pans installed under them when located above a living space. This is to collect condensate that leaks out of the unit. A pipe will be connected to the pan to allow the pan to drain this condensate off to the outdoors. If the pan is full of water, the drain pipe is clogged and will need to be snaked clear to empty. Locate the float switch. The float switch monitors the water level of the pan, so once it is empty - the switch float arm should be resting on the pan floor - not in the up position (which prevents the unit from starting).

These are the most common home-owner correctable issues that will prevent a unit from starting - there are many others that require advanced skills and equipment to detect and correct. Some of these are: low refrigerant gas, bad motor, bad start / run capacitor, bad relay coils, bad transformer, bad thermostat, the list goes on and on.

If all these items listed above are ok, the unit should attempt to start. If the unit still will not start or buzzing sound is heard professional service is likely required.

Good luck!

Aug 20, 2012 | Air Tools & Compressors

1 Answer

Low voltage wiring for thermostat and condensing unit


wiring from thermostat goes to furnace/air handler "R"=24volt primary, "G"=blower/fan, "W"=heating, "Y"=cooling/outdoor unit, "C"=common/blue wire. The "Y" and "C" from the furnace/thermostat wiring go to the outdoor unit and does not usually matter as to which one goes where unless there is a control board or timer in which case "Y" to "Y"=yellow. Common to "C"=blue or black. This will provide cooling.

Sep 24, 2011 | Goodman CKL36AR36 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Honeywell Wireless System THM5320R Wireless system and thermostat startup ok. The issue I am having is that; when the thermostat is in cooling mode and the unit starts the reversing valve is in the wrong...


how old is the existing system? i do ac in florida and usually if its not the wiring, an old systems rev. valve may stick. a firm tap on the valve may solve your problem.

Oct 28, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Honeywell Wireless System THM5320R Wireless system and thermostat startup ok. The issue I am having is that; when the thermostat is in cooling mode and the unit starts the reversing valve is in the wrong...


make sure you thermostat o terminal is used fir reversing valve in cooling, or b terminal is used if unit is a Rheem or Rudd, reversing valve at condensing unit may have bad connection.

Oct 28, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

3 Answers

Compressor will not start.


Usually short cycling means that High side pressure is getting to high (due to not working condenser fan, or dirty condenser coil), or low side pressure is getting too low (might have low level of freon or restriction in sealed system). low side would drop dramatically if indoor blower is not running, so if air is not circulating thru evaporator coil, coil will freeze up and low side would be much lower then normal. Here is video how I found issue with package AC not coming on. Thermostat call for cool, but condenser would not come on, indoor blower runs ok.

Nov 02, 2008 | Ruud UAMB Air Conditioner

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