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I just got an old set of kalimar Model K7070 Binoculars ( 7X-15X35)from my father. They seem to have some type of water drop marks in the left lens. Are these worth trying to repair. I do not know what he paid for them, as he got them many many years ago.

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The water drop marks you are seeing may be seperation of the lens coating. Most binoculars after WW2 have some form of anti-relective coating on the lens. This is applied to the glass surfaces in varying degress by various manufacturers. Its intended purpose is to reduce the amount of light that is reflected off the glass so that the image you see is brighter. Your windows at home that aren't covered actually don;t allow all of the light to come through!
What they all have in common is that the coating is applied onto the glass. Over time like anything that is stuck on or painted it can begin to peel off.
You could try asking a repair place if they caqn replace the lens but most likely they would need to change both so that they have the same coating. The binoculars are worth more for sentimental value than the cost of repair as a similar replacement set would cost as much. Zoom binoculars are not known for their optical quality. Often this 'watermark' effect doesn not interfere with the view. If your sentiments say fix them regardless do so. If not hold onto them as a keep sake.

Posted on Aug 01, 2009

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The eyepiece lenses have something on the inside. Can they be removed for cleaning?


  1. Carefully clean your binoculars by firstly removing any dirt or dust from the main body and straps using a soft microfibre cloth. Avoid the lenses at this point using any form of cloth on the lenses before removing all dirt and dust particles first could destroy them.
  1. Gently remove all traces of grit, dirt or dust particles from the lenses using a soft lens brush or canned air specifically designed for the purpose.
  1. Waterproof binoculars can be rinsed gently under a tap but be sure to use on lightly running water, avoid high pressure water as it could damage your binoculars.
  1. Gently remove any remaining marks using lens cleaning tools such as a lens pen or lens cleaning fluid and lens tissue. Do not be tempted to use kitchen towel or anything else lying around that is slightly rough and may scratch the surface of the lens, only use a lens pen, lens tissue or a lens cloth. Gently wipe the lens using a circular motion working from the centre of the lens to the outer edge. NEVER apply lens cleaning fluid directly onto the glass (always apply to the cloth) and always ensure that the lens cleaning fluid you are using is recommended for the type of lens coatings that have been applied to your binoculars (Do not use general household glass cleaning products or products designed to clean computer screens or glasses. Such products could destroy the lens coatings of your binoculars if used).

May 15, 2011 | Tasco 7x50 Waterproof w/Imp. Compass...

1 Answer

I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go


thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
Everything you need to know to become an expert:
on this website: http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm
It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

3 Answers

I have an old tasco 7x-15x35 zoom binocular. model #100. I lost the right rubber eye cup. Where can I purchase a replacement from........Thanks


You can't.

Tasco optical products are very cheaply made items, usually bought direct from whichever factory already makes the same or a similar model and then Tasco have their badges and packaging added.

They are consumer grade models which are not designed with longevity or repairs in mind; they're worth little when new and almost without value as used items.

The only repairs which can be done are by Tasco themselves whilst their products are under warranty. Except for the most minor of repairs, a warranty claim will simply involve exchanging the faulty item for a new one as any labour expended in repairs will often cost Tasco more than the wholesale price of a new unit.

Your only fixes are to live with the missing eyecup; to visit a binocular repair shop (not exactly commonplace) and see if you can buy an eyecup which can be adapted by yourself to fit; or to replace yours with another pair. You'll usually find that there are plenty for free on your local FreeCycle or Freegle group but they'll often have the even worse fault of a broken eyepiece yoke. But the price is right so it doesn't really matter if you have to collect five or six pairs before getting a good pair...

With all due respect, 7x-15x35 are going to be optically atrocious, so replacing your current pair is not a bad idea.

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1 Answer

Minolta Standard Zoom 7x to 15x x35 binoculars


yes it is fixable its the inner lenses coming loos and they will need to be fully striped down and cleaned the body air blasted out and then all lubed and put back together before being re-gased,,,standerd overhall job,,,pricy too,,,

Mar 03, 2010 | Optics

1 Answer

Value of the model 172 Jason Binoculars


I'm sorry to say this. Not much. Maybe 30 dollars US on a good day on the auction site if the binoculars are in great condition. Zoom binoculars are not known for their quality optics. Jason binoculars have a small collectable quality in a niche market for old Japanese optics. Just to have not for their optics. Non zoom older Jasons are worth a small amount more.

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2 Answers

Lens dislodged inside body of binoculars


doubt it very much...if you buy new please make sure they have a good warranty...there is just so much junk around....pentax or swift are good to start with at a reasonable price...gl/////larry@reichinstruments.com

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No zoom function on a kalimar power zoom scope,


larry389's so-called solution is not a solution... just an opinion to which each individual is entitled... even when not correct! I've used a Zeika Opt. Co. Power Zoom Binocular No.25361 for over 25 years since inheriting them from my father who purchased them in early 1970. To say the least, treated carefully and with respect for the delicate instrument that they are, they've been wonderful and still work perfectly fine. Perhaps Larry's experience is based upon handling them like junk and, therefore, reaping what he has sewn.

Jan 21, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

Water spots inside lenses


On the whole, I'd advise against dismantling binoculars yourself. Unlike most other optical devices, alignement is really important because you need to feed the same image into both eyes. If you're going to end up paying someone to realign the instrument, you might as well get them to do the cleaning at the same time. A.

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