Question about Samsung HP-R5072 50 in. Plasma HDTV

1 Answer

Burn in LCD HDtv

My husband didn't like the widescreen image at first, and kept it on the narrow image. Now I have bars on both sides of tv. Is there anything I can do?

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that gotĀ 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 20 times.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

  • Expert
  • 179 Answers

Not really,,burn in is just that,,the phosphors have burned and become discolored..some times you can lessen the difference by playing a pure white picture on the full screen for a long time, but this is really just discoloring the rest of the pixels so the difference is not so noticable

Posted on Nov 30, 2007

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
A 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
The service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Good luck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

What can be done about TV "burn in" samsung LTN4061FX


To prevent burn in don't leave an image on your screen for an extended period of time.This applies to bars and tickers on games and shows. Once you have it there is nothing that can be done.

Mar 04, 2011 | Samsung LN-T4061F 40 in. LCD HDTV

1 Answer

We have only had our television a year, and the colour is starting to change on its own to a dark red tone, and the 4x6 screen has been burned into the screen, making vey annoying to watch anything...


U have an image screen burn in.This is not fixable.This have happen,because u left the same image or setting on same setting day in day out,tv on all the times.

Sep 09, 2010 | LG 42LC2D 42 in. LCD HDTV

1 Answer

Can an LCD tv be kept in the garage without damage?


Well, It depends on the conditions of where you live.
Too much dust and moisture will cause a lot of problems.
Getting too cold will cause moisture to condense.
Getting too hot will cause parts inside not to cool off properly.
The TV should be ok as long as you keep it in a cool, dry place.

Feb 03, 2009 | Insignia 19 in. Widescreen Flat-Panel LCD...

1 Answer

On CNN or during football games banner is cut off


It sounds like you're watching wide screen content on a 4:3 tv, so the screen may be zoomed in so that the bars that would normally be on the top and bottom are not showing. Because the picture is zoomed in, images that would be at the top and bottom are off the screen. If you're watching from a home receiver (Uverse, DirecTv, Xfinity, etc.) you need to change the video settings to let the receiver know that your TV's aspect ratio is 4:3 (full screen) and not 16:9 (widescreen). Also, if your channel lineup has the option of watching CNN on a standard definition channel, that would also help because the shape of the image would be what your tv was designed for. If you watch 16:9 programs, you will have to choose letter box mode (bars on top and bottom because the shape of the widescreen image does not match the shape of your tv), pillar box mode (bars on either side) zoomed, or stretched. Stretched will make the shape of everything appear distorted, as it squeezes a widescreen image on the sides to make it narrow enough, so that everyone will have tall and skinny heads like an old Kung Fu movie. The sharpest picture would likely be to watch 16:9 (hi def) content in letterbox mode (bars on top and bottom) so at least you get the proper aspect ratio that the sports were recorded in, and it comes from a sharper source (HD vs SD). I would just deal with the bars, because even with a widescreen tv, there will sometimes be bars because that's how programs are sometimes recorded, for different visual impact or cinematic effect.

Jun 16, 2017 | Mito Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

Viewing mode will only go from zoom to wide!!!! please help


Hi!

Found some relevant info on how to adjust your video settings... You might want to give it a try!

Thanks! =)

4.12 PC Input Picture Adjustment
The Picture Adjust menu operates in the same
way for the PC Input as for the DTV / TV input in
section 4.2 for Backlight, Contrast, Brightness and
Color Temperature.
4.12.1 Auto Adjust
When the MENU button is pressed, the On Screen
Display (OSD) appears on the PICTURE ADJUST
page. Press the button to highlight the Auto
Adjust selection.
Press the button for the LCD HDTV to adjust to
the PC signal timing automatically.
4.12.2 H-SIZE
Press the button to highlight the H-Size selection.
Press the button to start adjusting the horizontal size of the picture. Use the or button to adjust
the horizontal size.
4.12.3 Horizontal Shift
Press the button to highlight the Horizontal Shift selection.
Press the button to start adjusting the horizontal position of the picture. Use the or button to
adjust the horizontal position.
4.12.4 Vertical Shift
Press the button to highlight the Vertical Shift selection.
Press the button to start adjusting the vertical position of the picture. Use the or button to adjust
the vertical position.
4.12.5 Fine Tune
Press the button to highlight the Fine Tune selection.
Press the button to start tuning the to the PC signal. Use the or button to adjust the tuning

4.14.1 Understanding Viewing Features
Your LCD HDTV features four viewing modes and Picture-In-Picture (PIP)/Picture-by-Picture (POP) mode.
You can switch viewing modes using the remote control.
4.14.2 Viewing Modes
Normal Mode
The original 4:3 aspect ratio (1.33:1 source) is preserved, so black bars are
added to the left and right of the display image. Standard TV broadcasts are
displayed with a 4:3 Aspect Ratio. Movies in 4:3 Aspect Ratio may be referred
to as pan-and-scan or full frame. These movies were originally filmed in 16:9
(widescreen), and then modified to fit a traditional TV screen (4:3).
Wide Mode
When watching a standard broadcast or full-frame movie in this mode,
the display image is stretched proportionately to fill the TV screen.
When watching a widescreen (1.78:1 source) program or movie, the
display image fills the TV screen. If you are watching a widescreen
(1.85:1 or 2.35:1 source) program or movie, there will still be black
bars at the top and bottom.
Zoom Mode
When watching a widescreen (1.78:1, 1.85:1, or 2.35:1 source)
program or movie, the display image is zoomed proportionally to fill the
width of the screen. The top and bottom are cut off to remove most of
the source material’s black bars. This mode is good for programs or
movies with sub-titles.
Panoramic Mode
When watching a standard broadcast or full frame movie in this mode,
the 4:3 Aspect Ratio (1.33:1 source) display image is stretched
horizontally on the left and right sides to fill the TV screen. The center
of the image is not stretched.

Note: Viewing modes are saved based on input. For example, you lasted watched a DVD in widescreen
mode and then watched TV in standard mode. When you switch back to DVD input, the viewing mode
will return to widescreen.

Jan 04, 2009 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

1- I have a Panasonic TV (PT-53TW54)that has a "digital scan rate of 1080i,540P". I'm not sure if that means it has a digital tuner. Do I need a digital converter for this unit? 2- I'm using a...


1. Do I need any additional equipment to watch HDTV broadcasts on my HDTV-compatible TV?
In order to view over-the-air (OTA) HDTV broadcasts, you need to be within the reception area of a TV station broadcasting HDTV signals. Some TVs may require a set-top HDTV tuner and an external antenna to receive the broadcasts. Your cable or satellite provider may also offer HDTV channels as a part of their service, eliminating the need for a separate tuner. Please contact your local service provider to find out what kind of HDTV services they may offer.

2. What is CableCARD and how does it work?
HDTVs with CableCARD slots can accept a small card from your cable provider that allows you to receive standard definition and high definition digital broadcasts without a bulky set-top cable box. Please call your cable company to find out if they offer this service in your area.

btn_top_gold.gif spacer.gif line_gold.gif spacer.gif spacer.gif3. What is HDMI? Is it compatible with DVI?
HDMI, which stands for "High-Definition Multimedia Interface", is the consumer electronic industry's first connection capable of transmitting uncompressed digital audio/video signals. Components featuring HDMI can transmit both digital audio and video over one convenient cable, replacing the tangled mess that resides behind many home theater components. HDMI also offers improved quality over traditional analog connections thanks to all-digital transmission. Digital sources like DVDs and HDTV programming can now be transferred digitally from source to display without analog conversions that can degrade the original signal.

Unlike the HDMI interface, DVI only handles digital video. Through the use of an adapter, a DVI device can be connected to an HDMI device, but only video content can be transmitted. The audio signal would have to be transmitted through other methods such as analog RCA outputs or an optical digital output.

4. What's the difference between 720p and 1080i HDTV broadcasts? Does my CRT projection HDTV support both?
HDTV signals can be broadcast in either 720p and 1080i. It's up to the broadcaster which signal format to use, and both have their benefits. Our CRT projection HDTVs display 1080i signals in their native format. For 720p broadcasts, you can use the settings on your HDTV set-top tuner, cable box, or satellite tuner to convert a 720p signal into a 1080i signal that your TV can display.

btn_top_gold.gif spacer.gif line_gold.gif spacer.gif spacer.gif5. Why do I still see black bars on my widescreen TV when viewing certain widescreen DVDs and HDTV broadcasts?
Your widescreen TV has an aspect ratio of 16:9 (1.78:1), which is the aspect ratio of HDTV. However, movies are filmed at several different aspect ratios, including 2.35:1. Also referred to as "scope", 2.35:1 is a very panoramic aspect ratio that provides a wide field of view in the theater. Scope is much wider than your widescreen TV, so it still requires the use of letterboxing ("black bars") to fit the entire image on screen. Some TVs and DVD players have a zoom function that allows you to blow up the image so it fills the screen, but the sides of the image must be cropped in order to do so.

6. What will 4:3 broadcasts and DVDs look like on a widescreen TV?
There are multiple settings for adjusting the appearance of 4:3 material on Panasonic widescreen TVs. It can be viewed with black bars on the sides, preserving the way it was originally intended to be viewed. Some viewers find the black bars distracting, so they might prefer one of the stretch modes that lets you fill the entire TV screen with the image. One such mode is the JUST (justify) mode, which stretches only the outer portion of the picture while leaving the center untouched.

Oct 21, 2008 | Panasonic Televison & Video

1 Answer

50 INCH HITACHI ULTRAVISION HAS COLOR DIFFERENCE ON EDGE OF SCREEN


Hey, I found this on a blogsite about lcd rear projections....looks like our tv's screens have been burned by the "pillers" that surround the tv when switching from 4:3 to 16:9 or fullscreen... read below, I hope it helps !
cheers!
Vern

Rear projection crt's,the first generation widescreen tv's were notorious for that.Lcd and plasma can have the same problem,but it takes much longer and is not as harsh.Dlp's use tiny mirrors,so it isn't a problem with them.Lcd and plasma tv's should be ok unless you watch them with blck bars on them all the time.
We have lcd monitors at work,and i've seen them after a year with bad burn in.They also run 24 hrs a day 7 days a week with the same display.



GKar posted 2006 Oct 10 15:31 TooLFooL : i have 51" sony rear-projection and those freakin' grey bars burned themselves right into the screen...

I read that to avoid the burning you had to limit your 4:3 viewing time to 15% of total time viewed. (applied to my TV but apparently yours and others as well...great! now they tell you :-x , this applies unless 4:3 aspect was changed to stretched or zoomed...yuck :-x )

This really sucks as a Star Trek/Lexx/Farscape fan as they are mostly 4:3, fortunately the upconvert player/hdmi combo sends a 1080i 16:9 signal to my TV so the effects are drastically reduced by nearly filling the TV without the grey bars or burn in problem without stretch or zoom modes being used. yay! :wink: (default grey bars set to black automatically, apparently grey isn't needed due to screen area covered is sufficient for burn in not to be a problem.)

Apr 11, 2008 | Hitachi UltraVision CineForm 55VG825 55"...

1 Answer

Image Retention


burn in is not supposed to occur on an lcd tv, however I have an lcd from Proview that leaves images on the polymer layer the white horizontal address bar is the most prominent. if I leave the monitor off for about 3 days the images disappear, this may or may not help you, if Samsung has created a ticket on this issue you may well receive a prepaid shipping label to return the tv for repair.

Jan 10, 2008 | Samsung LN-S4051D 40 in. LCD Television

Not finding what you are looking for?
Samsung HP-R5072 50 in. Plasma HDTV Logo

119 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Samsung Televison & Video Experts

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

75178 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17130 Answers

Jerry Greenberg
Jerry Greenberg

Level 3 Expert

1689 Answers

Are you a Samsung Televison and Video Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...