Question about Sony Handycam DCR-HC14E Mini DV Digital Camcorder

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Over exposed recordings

I frequently seem to get over exposed recordings when in bright light/high UV areas (mediterraen) I know you can manually adjust the exposure but surely this shouldn't be necessary as often as it appears to be. Is this known to be a problem?

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Sounds like it is infared sensative camera ha can you find heat sources with it or see a shadow of items in a handbad in droad daylight. Can you take night pixs with very little light. Put on a filter that reduces this over lighting sort of sunglasses for the camera.

Posted on Jul 29, 2009

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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1 Answer

Remove the purple rim around my pictures?


That is known as 'purple fringing' and is usually the result of the sensors and/or the lenses in your camera not being able to handle higher contrasts or over-exposure. Scientifically it has more to do with the how the camera sensor responds to the available light spectrum. (see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purple_fringing) Have you notice it is generally more pronounced where a very bright (white) area meets a high contrast (black) edge (like a bright sky behind a dark or shadowed object)? Best way to avoid is to be careful about the relative light levels exposures when framing the shot---or using a UV filter. There are many photo editing programs which can help eliminate purple fringing in post production. Have a read through: http://www.photoforbeginners.com/news/tutorials/how-to-remove-purple-fringing-from-your-photos.

Nov 09, 2014 | Fuji FinePix Cameras

1 Answer

My camera over exposes everything - the shutter stays open for about 2-3 seconds. except when on video settings. No matter what I set it at nothing changes.


Looking down at the top of the camera, check the left knob. This is the exposure compensation dial. Adjust it to "0". If set one way or the other, it will make pictures darker or lighter. This comes in handy when the image has a lot of dark or bright areas - moving this dial will allow you to make the bright areas darker or the dark areas lighter when you camera's light meter is setting the exposure in a way you do not want.

If still having trouble, make sure the right knob (Mode) is not set to M or Manual. Switch it to Program or Auto and try taking a picture again. You might even want to set the outer knob (ISO) to AUTO as well to reduce the chances of an incorrect setting. If it now works as expected, but you want to shoot in M, you will need to learn how to use the meter to select the correct combination of aperture (f stop), shutter speed and ISO to obtain the desired results.

Oh, experiment with the exposure compensation knob when you have a chance, learn how it can help correct overly dark / bright scenes. Good luck!

Feb 14, 2012 | Canon PowerShot G10 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Camera exilim ex-s600 will not take pictures outside,pictures turning out white,yet will take pictures inside ok.is this a worthwhile repair


This seems to be a software problem with your camera. Your camera should, if on AUTO mode, automatically expose your photo accurately. Try half pressing the shutter button (used to take pictures) while outside to adjust focus and exposure, then press the button fully to take picture. If your camera cannot adjust to take a properly exposed picture (not bright white), then it is possible that the shutter speed is stuck on a too high speed, outside daytime shutter speed should be fast (1/1000 sec). Or if your shutter speed adjust accurately, it could be the aperture if the aperture is not small enough for daylight shooting. This is likely a software problem. Try adjusting your settings manually and see if the picture turns out!

Sep 10, 2011 | Casio EXILIM Card EX-S770 Digital Camera

1 Answer

There was no manual when I purchased this item, is it submersible or does it sit outside the pond?


According to Pondmaster, location doesn't matter as much as the flow going through it. You will have to plumb it where it is convenient for you, and allow for bypass valves. From their website:
How much water should I flow over my UV?
Just enough and not too much. Easy, right? On the contrary, this is a very tough question. To clarify, or control green water, the recommended dosage is 15 microwatts per second per cubic centimeter of water at a frequency of UVC of 265 nanometers. Whew! What this boils down to is a formula for the right amount of sunburn. You don't want to incinerate the cells, that would take too much energy, you don't even need to kill them, just to stop them from reproducing, so there is a maximum recommended flow rate that ensures that the cells passing through the light will get enough of a 'tan' to make them sterile (hence the term UV Sterilizer). Too fast a flow means not enough exposure and hence, no effect on the cells. Our UV's are rated, therefore, by the maximum flow that will still provide for enough exposure to the light to be effective. It follows that you can make a light more effective by slowing the flow, thus increasing exposure time, so we often recommend a Valved Bypass [insert link to Valved Bypass instructions] to selectively flow only part of the water going to the falls through the UV, to maximize exposure rates. However, and this is the tricky part, if the flow is too slow and not enough pondwater is being exposed quickly enough, the algae can reproduce before they make it into the UV. This sometimes happens in larger ponds with lots of nutrients and sunlight, and generally requires multiple UV units for effective control. The point is, do not exceed the maximum flow rates recommended or your UV just won't work, and decreasing the flow will typically make the UV work better.

Aug 13, 2011 | Pondmaster UV Clarifer

1 Answer

Hi When I try to take pictures of the moon at night, the all I get is bright light without any detail. The sensor seems overloaded and the image seems smudged. I have tried with the intelligent...


All automatic-exposure cameras try to render the scene as a middle gray. The moon is a small portion of the total image, so the camera concentrates on the sky. In trying to get enough light to make the sky go from black to gray, the moon gets completely overexposed. What you want is the moon properly exposed, even if that means the sky goes completely black.

For a full moon, you want the same exposure you would use at noon on a bright day. If you think about it for a moment, it becomes obvious. The full moon is simply a landscape at high noon. Unfortunately, the camera can't know that.

Set the camera to manual. Start with the "Sunny-16 Rule", which tells you to set the aperture to f/16 and the shutter speed to 1/ISO. So for example, set the ISO to 200, the aperture to f/16, and the shutter speed to 1/200. Look at the result on the screen and adjust the exposure as needed.

That was for a full moon. For other phases you may need to add exposure, but the "Sunny-16 Rule" will still give you a starting point.

Jun 18, 2011 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX3 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Outdoor photos are all over exposed and white. Video works fine.


set ur screen first .click one image 1st load on ur pc. see the screen and pc screen then set ur screen brightness and contrast of ur camera

Jun 17, 2009 | Mitsuba DV505 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Background is overexposed


So, the problem doesn't seem to be the flash if the actual subject in the foreground is exposed properly. My guess is that the background is being lit by another light source. Typically, your camera uses a flash for dark areas or what it gauges as a dark area. This doesn't adjust the background for additional light sources. For example, if you're standing outside and there's a tree covering someone that you're taking a picture of your flash will adjust to "properly" light that individual. However, because the flash was used for the main subject, the background is actually now overexposed. The overexposed background will show up as a brightly lit area because the camera had to adjust for the foreground. This will actually reverse itself when it's dark out - meaning if the background and foreground are dark, the flash will expose the foreground, but the background will be black. Hopefully, that helps you understand lighting and exposure. Now, to fix this problem when shooting, you would need to consider several options - 1. SLR camera with aperture and f-stop settings as well as compensation controls. This will allow you to control every element of the exposure, but you still need to be aware of the lighting behind the "subject" to properly expose your shots. 2. backlighting compensation - common settings on both SLR and point and shoot cameras that makes auto lighting conversions for backlighting and other common lighting issues. Test whatever options are on your camera to see what works best for your specific problem. 3. Photoshop retouching - you may take one shot with your subject exposed properly and a second shot with the background then merge the images together. 4. using a tripod to shoot without using the flash - this may give you the closest exposure to exactly what you see when looking at your subject.

Dec 19, 2008 | Polaroid i733LP Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pictures appear to be darker than original in print outs.


You can make several adjustments to improve your images such as lightening dark areas, changing the exposure, sharpening blurred edges, and changing the brightness and contrast.
  • Exposure adjusts the overall intensity of light in an image.
  • Adaptive Lighting improves only the dark areas in an image without affecting the bright areas.
  • Brightness adjusts the amount of light in colors ranging from light to dark.
  • Contrast adjusts the difference in brightness between light and dark areas of an image.
  • Sharpness helps define edges and the smoothness of texture in an image. Use this tool to make a blurred image appear more focused.
Adjusting the image Follow the steps below to make adjustments:
  1. Click the View tab and select the image you want to edit by either clicking the image, or by clicking the small box at the bottom left corner of the image. Figure 1: Select the image c00603524.gif
  2. Click the Edit tab and then click the Advanced tab.
  3. On the Advanced tools tab, click Adjust Image .
  4. Select an adjustment from the list on the left. Figure 2: Adjusting the brightness c00603525.gif
    • The Exposure adjustment is automatically applied when the Adjust Image tool opens. Eight variations of the image are displayed on the left. The current image is displayed in the center. Each image represents a different level of adjustment. When you move the pointer over any of the images on the left, a large version of the image is displayed. Use Preferences to turn this large image preview on or off and to set the timing for the display.
    • If you want to use a different adjustment tool, select Adaptive Lighting , Brightness , Contrast , or Sharpness from the list.
  5. Select one of the images on the left.
  6. Do one of the following:
    • Click Accept to accept all changes and exit from the Color Toolkit.
    • Click Cancel to discard all changes and exit from the Color Toolkit.
  7. If you have finished modifying the image, do one of the following to save your changes:
    • Click Save to overwrite the original image.
    • Click Save As to save the modified image with a different name.

Aug 25, 2008 | HP Photosmart D7160 InkJet Printer

1 Answer

Nikon d50


the flashing means that the exposure is not correct for that area. if that area was the subject, then you might want to adjust the settings to reduce sensitivity in order to view that area correctly. if you spot meter the 'true subject' in the frame, there will often be areas outside that subject that are either brighter or more dimly lit. but exposure will be right for the subject. it can't all be correctly exposed if there is much variation in lighting. fill flashes will provide more light to the subject, thus resulting in a reduction in sensitivity of the resulting settings. (shorter exposure time or smaller aperture or a combination of both) and that will let the brighter areas move closer to 'not washing out' or being over exposed as some people refer to it. in either approach, its not a defect or problem unless it bothers you. the flashing just lets you know that you can modify settings if it matters that the photograph has high levels of contrast beyond what you may want. sometimes the subject is not in the center, and thus not metered for. but the framing is set to include something off to the side. you can reset exposure by adjusting exposure compensation so that while you are reading a darker area than that of the subject, you don't want the camera to use that area for light settings necessarily.
recap: exposure control via exposure compensation or fill flash
mark

Dec 22, 2007 | Nikon D50 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Light Meter


Check your metering settings. Are you using centerweighted, matrix, or spot metering? Try setting camera to matrix metering, use program mode 'P' and adjust exposure to default.

Sep 05, 2007 | Nikon D50 Digital Camera

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