Question about Nikon Speedlight SB-800 TTL Flash

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SB800 under exposure

While shooting a large indoor party I noticed that the background was very dark. I tried changing from spot to matrix metering and from Programmed to Manual exposure without any success. I use an external power supply for the SB800 and for the most part was 6 to 10 feet from my subjects. I estimate that the files are 2 to 3 stops underexposed. I am using a D2X camera. Any Ideas? Stew

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Hi Stew,

Do the following:

ISO: 400
Shooting Mode: RAW or high JPEG
White Balance: Flash
Camera Mode: M
Camera Shutter: 30 or lower
Lens Aperture: 2.8
Flash Mode: A at 2.8
Flash: Wait until flash fully charged

Now, it's magic!
Send me some money for this tips when you make more money and produces great exposures:-)
Now, you're the top photographer in the town.

You can set ISO to 800 if you are not printing bigger than 8 X10.

Hope above are helpful to you and all photographers.

Alexander
atdlee@netzero.com

Posted on Dec 21, 2007

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