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Our fan makes clicking sound at low speed. Ring at motor that hold blade arms appears cracked

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

jerryg50
  • 1667 Answers

SOURCE: clicking sound

The fan should be replaced. The bearings are getting worn out.

Jerry G.

Posted on Jun 06, 2008

  • 6 Answers

SOURCE: fan blades or motor in Nucor over the stove hood

The FR Series fans from Fantech are glued closed to prevent air leakage. Its better to replace the fan than to try and fix it. The cheapest place to buy a Fantech fan is at http:///www.hvacquick.com as they buy direct from Fantech.
Alos the FR Series fan comes with a 5 Year Manufactures warranty.

Posted on Feb 10, 2009

SOURCE: Hunter fan with remote control was 3 speed, now only 2 speed

It sounds like fan motor is okay. There are two motor windings -- one low speed, one medium speed. Low winding gives you low speed, medium winding gives you medium speed, both windings give you high speed -- so I would say if you get high speed, both windings are good.

The remote (the hand held transmitter) controls the speed by raising and lowering the frequency of the current which is 60 cycle coming to the fan ceiling box. If the fan speed -selector switch (usually a pull switch) is set to high, when the remote (transmitter) signals the receiver to change speeds, the frequency of the current is changed by the receiver (the receiver is usually in the fan housing).

Sounds like you'll need to replace the remote system -- these come in sets, both transmitter and receiver, and cost about $30. If you're not experienced with wiring fans, you should get an electrician to do the job.

Posted on Apr 22, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: 2004 Dodge Dakota Heater fan motor will not run on low speed. All

Your blower resistor may be wearing out or corrosion setting in. The part is cheap and you can probably replace it. This link shows where an 01 is located. Yours may be in the same spot on on the engine bay side of the passenger firewall. Check with your auto parts store also for location.

http:/www.gtrippleb.com/auto/durango/tech/durango_blower_resistor.htm

Posted on Dec 22, 2009

mcdevito75
  • 1970 Answers

SOURCE: oscillating table fan makes banging noise when rotating

mcdevito75 here, Sounds like that oscillating swtich is either a little loose or could use a drop or 2 of 3 in 1 oil. Try to twist offf the oscillating swatch button and see if you can tighten it or put a drop of oil on it.

Posted on Jul 28, 2010

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1 Answer

The heater fan on my 2005 RX 330 makes noise when it runs - particularly on low speed setting. Sounds like it needs to be oiled or something.


The fan may have come loose at the mounting points & shifted cracking or warping the fan/blades... Either that or something has fallen in & making contact with the fan

Jan 10, 2011 | Lexus RX 330 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Hunter fan with remote control was 3 speed, now only 2 speed


It sounds like fan motor is okay. There are two motor windings -- one low speed, one medium speed. Low winding gives you low speed, medium winding gives you medium speed, both windings give you high speed -- so I would say if you get high speed, both windings are good.

The remote (the hand held transmitter) controls the speed by raising and lowering the frequency of the current which is 60 cycle coming to the fan ceiling box. If the fan speed -selector switch (usually a pull switch) is set to high, when the remote (transmitter) signals the receiver to change speeds, the frequency of the current is changed by the receiver (the receiver is usually in the fan housing).

Sounds like you'll need to replace the remote system -- these come in sets, both transmitter and receiver, and cost about $30. If you're not experienced with wiring fans, you should get an electrician to do the job.

Apr 21, 2009 | Hampton Bay 24002 Ceiling Fan

2 Answers

Constant clicking sound when fan is on


PATTI-- THIS CEILING FAN IS AT MY DAUGHTERS HOME IN RENO--WE LIVE ABOUT 50 MILES FROM HER SO WE HAVEN'T BEEN IN YET TO TRY REMOVING THE GLOBE--PERHAPS WE WON'T BE ABLE TO REMOVE IT EVEN WITH THE INSTRUCTIONS IF YOU ARE HAVING THAT PROBLEM. IF YOU FIND A WAY TO REMOVE IT, PLEASE LET ME KNOW. WHEN WE GET IN TO RENO I'LL LET YOU KNOW IF I AM ABLE TO REMOVE IT.

Mar 29, 2009 | Hampton Bay 54 In. Flemish Pewter Ceiling...

1 Answer

Fan motor very loud at low speeds


sounds like something inside blower fan that should not be there , higher speed causes outward force inside so that whatever is in there is forced against the blades and therefore is not as loud

Feb 19, 2009 | 1987 Volvo 240

1 Answer

Ceiling fan woobles on high speed


Turn off fan, then check to see that all of the blade mounting screws are tight. (check blade to blade arm and blade arm to fan body screws/mounting mechs.) If none are loose, you can purchase a blade balancing kit from most hardware stores, including Home Depot and Lowes. Let us know if this helps or the cure you come up with.

Aug 23, 2008 | Hampton Bay 24002 Ceiling Fan

1 Answer

Motor problem


hi,

I wrote to a person earlier about oiling one, now Im thinking she may be having the same problem you have, I will paste that info at the bottom, but sounds like your fan blade assembly has come loose and/or worked its way back down to the motor, study the fan blade assembly and look for an allen bolt or ring holding the assembly to the shaft, remove the ring or loosen the allen bolt , adjust the fan blade assembly so it doesent bind, oil the motor with regular 10w40 motor oil and dust the fan, these are good little fans and that company has been making those since the40's, also sending user guide link.
http://www.vornado.com/manuals/allcirc.pdf

J

Aug 04, 2008 | Vornado Circulating Fan

1 Answer

Hampton bay fan noise


The fan does not need to be oiled. The bearings are what manufacturers described as "permanently-sealed", which means that they're designed such that they don't require oiling. The manufacturers recommend against oiling, and if you really wanted to do it, you'd have to be an expert, because there is some very complex disassembly to be done, which requires specialized tools.

HOWEVER...

The problem is not related to oil. A lack of oil does not produce a hum. If a fan's bearings are low on oil, the sound generated is a scraping or brushing sound. A hum, on the other hand, is an electrical sound. All fan motors hum to some degree -- the cheap made-in-China ones, like in your Hampton Bay fan, hum more than others. There are some steps you can take to reduce the hum:

* If you are using the fan with a solid-state control (i.e. a dimmer), that will cause the fan to hum. These controls are dangerous when used with fans, and a fire can result. You should have a qualified person remove the switch immediately and replace it with either a regular on/off switch OR a discrete-speed (i.e. 3-speed or 4-speed, rather than variable-dimmer) switch. Specially-designed ceiling fan switches such as this are available at your local Home Depot or Lowes. You could also use a remote-control system.

* If you have a remote control or other speed control system, make sure that the pull-chain speed control on the fan is set to the "high" position (highest speed possible) and left there.

* Make sure that all the screws are tight -- this includes screws which hold up the fan's mounting bracket, hold the blades onto the fan, and hold any applicable glass onto the light kit.

* Even if you don't have a speed control, the motor will still produce an electrical hum -- and the blades, which are physically attached to the motor, serve as mechanical amplifiers -- they take the tiny electrical hum and amplify it just like the big brass funnel speaker on an antique gramophone (record player) takes the tiny vibrations of the needle on the record and amplifies them to a comfortably audible level. High-end fans have a rubber flywheel attached to the motor between the blade holders and the motor unit -- and since rubber doesn't transmit vibrations well, this effectively deadens the sound. Your fan doesn't have one of these, but you can effectively replicate the noise-dampening effect by putting rubber washers between where the blade holders touch the bottom of the motor AND between where the screws which hold the blade holders onto the motor, meet the blade holders themselves. This will completely remove the path along which the sound vibrations can flow to the blades, and thus your hum will stop.

I hope this helps you! If you have any other questions, or need clarification, please ask!

Jun 14, 2008 | Hampton Bay 24002 Ceiling Fan

1 Answer

Celing fan making noise, how to oil


The fan does not need to be oiled. The bearings are what manufacturers described as "permanently-sealed", which means that they're designed such that they don't require oiling. The manufacturers recommend against oiling, and if you really wanted to do it, you'd have to be an expert, because there is some very complex disassembly to be done, which requires specialized tools.

HOWEVER...

The problem is not related to oil. A lack of oil does not produce a hum. If a fan's bearings are low on oil, the sound generated is a scraping or brushing sound. A hum, on the other hand, is an electrical sound. All fan motors hum to some degree -- the cheap made-in-China ones, like in your Hampton Bay fan, hum more than others. There are some steps you can take to reduce the hum:

* If you are using the fan with a solid-state control (i.e. a dimmer), that will cause the fan to hum. These controls are dangerous when used with fans, and a fire can result. You should have a qualified person remove the switch immediately and replace it with either a regular on/off switch OR a discrete-speed (i.e. 3-speed or 4-speed, rather than variable-dimmer) switch. Specially-designed ceiling fan switches such as this are available at your local Home Depot or Lowes. You could also use a remote-control system.

* If you have a remote control or other speed control system, make sure that the pull-chain speed control on the fan is set to the "high" position (highest speed possible) and left there.

* Make sure that all the screws are tight -- this includes screws which hold up the fan's mounting bracket, hold the blades onto the fan, and hold any applicable glass onto the light kit.

* Even if you don't have a speed control, the motor will still produce an electrical hum -- and the blades, which are physically attached to the motor, serve as mechanical amplifiers -- they take the tiny electrical hum and amplify it just like the big brass funnel speaker on an antique gramophone (record player) takes the tiny vibrations of the needle on the record and amplifies them to a comfortably audible level. High-end fans have a rubber flywheel attached to the motor between the blade holders and the motor unit -- and since rubber doesn't transmit vibrations well, this effectively deadens the sound. Your fan doesn't have one of these, but you can effectively replicate the noise-dampening effect by putting rubber washers between where the blade holders touch the bottom of the motor AND between where the screws which hold the blade holders onto the motor, meet the blade holders themselves. This will completely remove the path along which the sound vibrations can flow to the blades, and thus your hum will stop.

I hope this helps you! If you have any other questions, or need clarification, please ask!

Apr 30, 2008 | Hampton Bay 24002 Ceiling Fan

1 Answer

Blade is loose


on the inner part of the motor [fan side] look for an external snap ring and a fiber spacer. the armature fits all the way into the rear part of the housing, the other housing goes over the motor shaft and must press against the snap ring and fiber washer.

Sep 03, 2007 | Vornado Circulating Fan

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