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The demand for commodity x is represented by the equation P=40-0.6Qd and supply by the equation P=-30+0.8Qs.

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: ACME Skateboards Inc., has paid

Hello,
Doesn't any body do their homework anymore? How are they supposed to learn anything?
Draw your graphs by hand or on a graphing calculator.
Think about the intersection points. (What does that mean when two curves intersect?)
Use the equation for the demand to obtain D for a particular x.
You can also determine by how much one function exceeds another for a particular value of the x variable (the graph is rather clear).
I assume you can solve a quadratic equation.
Use these hints to solve the problem.
Here is a graph. I even restricted it to the first quadrant so as not to mislead you into giving meaningless answers.


.e89465e.jpg

Hope it helps.

Posted on Oct 04, 2009

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Chacha answers


It seems to me that you are trying to solve the quadratic equation
aX^2+bX+c=10 with a=-3, b=3, c=15 or -3X^2+3X+15=0.
Since the all the coefficients are multiples of 3, one can simplify the equation by dividing every thing by 3, leaving -X^2+X+5=0. But to avoid confusing you I will consider the original equation -3X^2+3X+15=0..
You must first find out if the equation has any real solutions. To do that you calculate the discriminant (you do not have to remember the name if you choose to).
Discriminant is usually represented by the Greek letter DELTA (a triangle)
DELTA =b^2-4*a*c =(3)^2-4*(-3)*(15)=189
If the discriminant is positive (your case) the equation has two real solutions which are given by
Solution1 =X_1=(-3-SQRT(189))/(-2*3)=(1+SQRT(21))/2
Solution2 =X_2=(-3+SQRT(189))/(-2*3)=(1-SQRT(21))/2 or about -1.791287847
Here SQRT stands for square root.

Aug 17, 2014 | Computers & Internet

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HOW TO CHANGE A BALLCOCK ON COMMODE


HOW TO REPLACE A BALLCOCK ON A WATER CLOSET, COMMODE: FIRST SHUT WATER OFF TO COMMODE. THER WILL BE A WATER SHUTOFF VALVE BETWEEN THE FLOOR AND THE COMMODE ON THE WATER LINE TO YOUR BALLCOCK, TURN WATER OFF, FLUSH COMODE SO YOU CAN CLEAR MOST ALL OF THE WATER OUT OF IT. THEN UNCREW THE NUT FOR THE WATER SUPPLY, THEN UNSREW THE NUT FOR THE BALLCOCK ITSELF, OPEN THE TOP OF THE COMMODE, YOU WILL SEE A FLAPPER ON THE BALLCOCK, REMOVE IT, THEN TAKE THE BALLCOCK OUT, SOME HAVE A ROD AND FLOAT SOME DO NOT, EITHER WAY IF IT DOES WHEN YOU PUT THE BALLCOCK BACK IN THE SAME WAY THE OLD ONE CAME OUT MAKE SURE YOU HAVE THE GASKET ON WHEN YOU STICK THE END OF THE BALLCOCK BACK, TIGHTEN THE NUT, THEN MAKE SURE YOUR WASHER IS IN THE NUT ON THE WATER LINE AND RE CIONNECT WATER LINE, YOU CAN ADUST FLOAT VALVE BY BENDING THE ROD DOWN TO THE AMOUNT OF WATER YOU WILL WANT CONNECT FLAPPER BACK, TO THE NEW BALLCOCK, IF THE BALLCOCK DOES NOT HAVE A FLOAT, YOU CAN ADJUST PER INSTRUCTION, SO AFTER ALL THIS IS DONE AND TUBE IS CONNECTED FROM BALLCOCK TO THE TOP OF IT WITH CLIP, TO DIRECT YOUR FILL WATER, TURN YOUR WATER ON AND ADJUST SOME MORE IF NEED BE, UNTILL YOUR CORRECT AMOUNT OF WATER IS LIKE YOU WANT IT...THIS IS REALLY EASY COMPARED TO PAYING A PLUMBER FOR THIS JOB, AND IT HAS TO BE DONE QUITE OFTEN, LARRY VEAL MASTER PLUMBER TEXAS

on Apr 24, 2010 | Plumbing

1 Answer

How to solve the circumference by using fomulae p=2


The formula is simply this: C = (pi)d. In this equation, "c" represents the circumference of the circle, and "d" represents its diameter. That is to say, you can find the circumference of a circle just by multiplying the diameter by pi, which is an approximation of 3.14.

Jan 30, 2014 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

How can i solve tree equations with fx 4500p


Do you mean three (3) linear equations in 3 unknowns, or tree allometric equations? Thank you Al Gore for inventing the Internet.
For the second case, we really need to know the form of the functions in view of their graphical representation:
Since this calculator cannot do graphs, you can generate a table of values and then represent the variation on graphing paper (linear or logarithmique) depending on the form of the dependence.
Here is a link to the user's manual for this calculator.

Casio fx 4500P silrun Systems

Jan 11, 2014 | Office Equipment & Supplies

1 Answer

How To Do Linear Equations


Which of the following equations? What following equations?

Nov 15, 2013 | Office Equipment & Supplies

1 Answer

Polynomial function


Hi there,

Say you have an equation x = 2y.

On a graph, you plot the points representing the values that fit into the equation.

X Y
2 1
4 2
6 3
etc.

And to throw a curve in there:
X Y
-2 -1
-4 -2
-6 -3

If have further questions repost, I'll be around for a while.

Hope it helps
Mike

Nov 24, 2009 | The Learning Company Achieve! Math &...

1 Answer

ACME Skateboards Inc., has paid consultants to look over last year's sales and provide them with supply and demand equations that fit their sales data. The consultants provided the equation S = 0.09x^2 -...


Hello,
Doesn't any body do their homework anymore? How are they supposed to learn anything?
Draw your graphs by hand or on a graphing calculator.
Think about the intersection points. (What does that mean when two curves intersect?)
Use the equation for the demand to obtain D for a particular x.
You can also determine by how much one function exceeds another for a particular value of the x variable (the graph is rather clear).
I assume you can solve a quadratic equation.
Use these hints to solve the problem.
Here is a graph. I even restricted it to the first quadrant so as not to mislead you into giving meaningless answers.


.e89465e.jpg

Hope it helps.

Oct 04, 2009 | Office Equipment & Supplies

1 Answer

Garmin Hand held GPS Operation


v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);} Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} It’s hard to cover all the details in a forum like this but I’ll give you a quick primer. I can send you a powerpoint presentation that explains it in a little more detail. To really learn how to read latitude and longitude you should pick up a copy of “Chapman’s Piloting and Seamanship.”

The earth is divided into parallels of latitude and meridians of longitude, also known as lines of position.

clip_image002.jpg

Latitude is measured north and south of the equator, with the equator represented as 0 degrees, and the poles being represented as 90 degrees North or South. Latitude lines are paralel to the equator. For example, if I was at the equator I would be at 0 degrees. If I traveled exactly 60 nautical miles to the north, I would be at 1 degree North, and if I traveled another 60 miles I would be at 2 degrees north. Your GPS display will preface the Latitude measurement with an “N” for positions North of the equator and an “S” for positions south of the equator.

Longitude measures your position east or west from the Prime Meridian, which is a line represented as 0 degrees that bisects the earth from north to south and passes through Greenwich England. Halfway around the earth at the International Dateline Longitude is 180 degrees. Measuring Longitude is a little more complicated because the lines are not parallel and requires an accurate clock (your GPS) to compare time at your location relative to the time in Greenwich England. Your GPS display will preface the Longitude measurement with a “W” for positions west of Greenwich and an “E” for positions east of Greenwich.

To make more accurate measurements each degree is divided into 60 minutes. Because the lines are parallel, 1 minute of latitude is equal to 1 nautical mile. Each minute can be further divided into 60 seconds. Each second is roughly equivalent to a distance of 100’ Instead of seconds, the default setting on your Garmin breaks the minute down into tenths, hundredths, and thousandths for meven more precise measurements. Because they are not parallel, lines of Longitude are measured the same way, but the distances vary depending on how far north or south of the equator.

To find out where you are with a GPS, you need a map that shows lines of latitude and longitude on it. The lines will be labeled on the map or along the borders of the map. Most nautical charts show the latitude measurements along the right the left border of the map. Longitude measuremnts will be shown along the top and bottom edges.

Dec 16, 2008 | Garmin GPS 126 GPS Receiver

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