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Ok...im getting a speaker that has an 8 nominal load and 600W peak 400Wprogram and 200W RMS...two...what is RMS and what kind of amp do i need so that i dont get screwd over. thank you bunchesand also i need an amp thats under $250 to $300

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RMs is the average power (really basically) > You need to get an amp that is around 150W - 180 WRMS. You need to be really specific about the rms. Dont let guys tell you 1000 W peak etc. Peak is term that can often have several meanings, but true RMS is the norm standard for assesing proper power in pro gear. Whatever you find check out the specs for yourself in writing!!!
Hope it helps

Posted on Jul 26, 2009

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What kind of amp can adequately power P112 S8 subs


you shouldnt run it at 8 ohm it shows what ohms it can handle . to run it at 1 ohm you would need 2 subs to do this. and no i wouldnt run an 8 ohm sub on the amp.

Aug 23, 2012 | Rockford Fosgate Punch Stage P112 S8 Car...

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What type of amp do I need for apair of rfdj1 12" dj 600w band speakers?


The 600 watt rating is FAKE like most of our advertising and will be either 600 watts PEAK or 600 watts PROGRAM. If it is Peak, use an amplifier with no more than 100 watts a side RMS... If it is program rating use an amp with no more than 150 watts a side RMS but that is pushing it for speaker safety. Also pay attention to the spec of the amp as to what it will output at the impedance of the speakers. I read the spec on the speakers... they are rated 150 watts RMS, NOT 600 watts... Use an amp rated at 150 watts RMS MAXIMUM at 4 ohms per side. Also don't turn up the bass excessively or you be buying new speakers. Twelve inch speakers would be adequate for a 20 by 20 room at SAFE listening levels. If you want driving bass, you need to get an 18 inch subwoofer.

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My woofer is 18' 600w rms power. so what is the


Basically you cannot break you woofer with too powerful amp, but you can break it using too weak amp. This is because if you don't have enough watts going to you woofer the cones movement isn't controlled properly. I'm usually using +20% to the woofers RMS and peak power. This will also make the amp last longer because you won't use it at it's peak performance all the time. If possible use manufacturer whose prising policy matches your woofers manufacturers, that way you won't end up with "2000w peak power" cheap amp with real output of 30w. and in the other end cheap woofer won't handle expensive amp with real 600w rms so well, you need to find a midlle way here. Hard to say without knowing the make and model of the woofer.
This is a taste question for some people, and I haven't build a system to match so powerful woofer ever in my life. But I'm pretty sure you won't go wrong with this one.

May 20, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

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I have a Sony CDX-M30 Marine Stereo that when the volume is turned up over 20, it cuts off, then comes back on and if you don't turn it down, it cuts off again. Recently, it only has to be around...


One possible cause is a mismatched speaker system. Most stereo equipment specifies 8 ohm speakers to match the 8 ohm amplifier output resistance. A well known electronic formula states maximum power transfer occurs when the resistance in and the resistance out are equal. When there is a mismatch, more power is required to obtain the same sound pressure levels. By turning the volume up higher to do this, the electrical requirements to drive the speakers at that level may be exceeding that which the amp can provide. When this happens, the amp shuts down due to overload. Continued operation in this condition can cause permanent failure.

Another possible cause is the power requirements of the speakers to be driven properly. Larger speakers require more power to move the speaker coil and and cone. Connecting a speaker that requires 10 watts to be driven to an amplifier that provides up to 8 or even 10 watts will require that the amp be operating at 100% of capacity. An amplifier run like this will have a short life.

Connect speakers that match the amplifier's impedance requirements (8 ohm types are pretty standard / common) and will operate with the amount of power (in watts) that the amp can supply. Make sure you're comparing watt ratings in similar units. "P-P" (Peak to Peak), "Peak" (or Max") and "RMS" are typical terms. RMS is the is the most common standard used, but as you'll see below, some manufacturers like to use different units to make their products seem to have more power than they actually do. You can convert easily between the terms like this:

200W P-P equals 100W peak, and also equals 71W RMS

"Peak" is 1/2 the value of "Peak to Peak" (P-P) and "RMS" which stands for Root Mean Squared, is 70.7% of Peak. 200W P-P sure sounds like it's more than 70W RMS - doesn't it? It's all pretty simple once you know. Lastly, the fictional unit "Music Power" can be anything really, but is often either Peak or P-P values. It's just more smoke and mirrors by some manufacturers.

I hope this helps and good luck. Please rate my reply. Thanks!

May 12, 2011 | Sony CDX-C5005 CD Player

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I just bought 2 plsq10d/ 10" square Pyle subwoofers. I've got some questions. What would be better, one amp or two? How many watts for the amp(s)? Do I need to mess with my alternator to power this system?...


Hi, tech specs say 1200 watts peak. what you want is RMS value and quick guide I use to comvert watts peak to Rms is divide by 3 (approx=400Wrms) Ok to drive a little harder - use 500Watt RMS amps per speaker. decision to use 1 or 2 amps depends on amp capability -use 2 x 500wrms 2 channel amps(1 per speaker bridged mode) or 1 x 1000wrms 4 channel amp (bridge 2 channels for each speaker). Whether you need to do anything about your charging system will depend largely on the capability of your alternator and the various vehicle loads that need to be supplied on a day to day basis ( use winter for worst case scenarios) as this system could be reasonably expected to consume 60 amps on large bass notes (dead giveaway is to add the fuse ratings on nominated amps). there is vast amounts of knowledge for this subject and what has been touched on here is just that

Aug 10, 2010 | Car Audio & Video

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How can i get more power through 8 ohm speakers?


In addition to the impedance rating of a speaker, there is also a wattage rating. Ideally, power output of the amplifier should not exceed the power handling rating of the speakers. The input impedance of the speakers should match the amplifier output impedance for maximum power transfer (Rin = Rout where R is resistance in Ohms). Supplying more power or wattage to the speaker than it can handle will result in distortion, and if the output of the amp is high enough and present long enough, it will damage the voice coil of the speaker. Make sure that when comparing wattage ratings, you are comparing the same rating between amps & speakers. Watts can be expressed three different ways: "Peak", "Peak to Peak" and the industry standard "RMS". The relationship is such: an industry standard value of "70 Watts RMS" (70W RMS) equals "100 Watts Peak" (100W P) *and* also is the same as "200 Watts Peak to Peak" (200W P-P). Furthermore, there is no such thing as 200W "Music Power" (but is often expressed this way to inflate the RMS wattage rating (and usually is close to the P-P rating). A speaker is an electrical device, so most the things that happen to electrical devices when over powered can happen to speakers and amplifiers, too.

Increasing the signal source level (input signal to the amp via volume control) in an attempt to get more audio power to the speaker can overdrive the amplifier - resulting in "clipping". This is plainly heard as "muddied" sound. The otherwise loud, crisp, clean passages in music end up sounding garbled and unpleasant when an amplifier is over driven in this way. This can damage both the amp and the speaker.

Cheap amps with higher THD (total harmonic distortion) ratings sound worse than their counterparts with a lower THD rating - when all other variables are the same. You'll pay extra for lower THD values.

You might be able to make a speaker seem louder by positioning the speakers against a wall, on the floor, etc. Experiment; as it can make a significant difference in sound levels and low frequency bass sounds.

I hope this was helpful!

Jun 11, 2010 | Yamaha Emx62m Powered PA Mixer System

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I think its an off brand amp and im not sure if that really is the peak but how off could it really be? I like the sound of the amp and sub but i want to get full power but i know that i need a new box....


Hello dwayne93702,

I would suggest that you take this to your local auto-sound shop to have this done, however here is a procedure that has worked for me in the past. (It is tedious, but it allows you to develop an excellent chart showing relationship between frequency and power and helps you know the frequency limitations of your amp.

If you are trying to get the full range of power then I would suggest doing what is called a load test. For this you will need to use high wattage power loads (high wattage resistive loads 8 ohms) connect these in place of your speakers and sub-woofer put the amp at full power and inject a 1000 Hz tone and then with an oscilloscope adjust the sine wave to 0 distortion and measure the output voltage (Peak to Peak) and then do this calculation to get the RMS voltage:
(P to P/ 2) x .707 = RMS
Use the RMS voltage divided by the resistance (8 ohms) to get your amperage (current value).
Then once you have your current use it multiplied by the RMS voltage to get your max Power without distortion.

This will give you a good indication of the max power you can get without distorting the signal. I use 1K Hz because it is a reference tone. basically you can do this test on the whole audio frequency spectrum for a more in-depth measurement (building a power response graph).

I hope this helps,

Aug 10, 2008 | Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

Auto decks and speakers


That's a 200W total output, which in a four-speaker system means 50W to each speaker. Keep in mind that this is a peak output, not a continuous power output. When you shop for amps or head units, pay more attention to the RMS rating (most of the better brands will give you both). This is the amount of power the unit puts out continuously. The peak power rating is how much it can put out in a burst. Similarly for speakers, buy based on the RMS rating more than the peak rating - you want to know how much power you can safely pump into the speakers continuously - the RMS rating will give that to you.

By definition, RMS value would be (peak rating) x(.707) but for ease of use, look at a peak value and figure on an RMS (continuous) rating of about half that - it allows you to err on the side of caution.

For what it's worth, 25W continuous to each speaker may not seem like much, but a lot of factory stereo systems put 15W or less to each speaker. 25W by comparison is a significant step up.

Jul 09, 2008 | Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

Logic alx1280 2 ch amp


Amps can be rated based on their RMS power or their peak power. In this case, the amp's rated RMS power is 300x2 at 2 ohms (total 600W RMS) with a peak power rating of 600x2 (1200W peak). For the most part, peak power means almost nothing.

If your head unit didn't have RCA preamp outputs, you would used the standard speaker outputs from the head unit and connect them to the hi input plug of the amp.

Mar 17, 2008 | Logic Soundlab ALX1280 Car Audio Amplifier

3 Answers

2 12" Hitron 600w subs in a BandPass box


Remember that driving a load with an underpowered amp will probably cause more problems than having a more powerful amp that is not running flat out. 200-300W amp would be ok, but I would suggest going for the biggest you can afford. If you crank up the volume on the smaller amp you will probably get a fair amount of distortion, which may actually damage the speakers. A larger amp will not give as much distortion for the same loudness/volume and give better control of the speakers for a tighter bass..

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