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120 volt cord replacement, I replaced the belt and have only 2 wires coming from the power cord, 1 black which is hot and a white, don't know where the white wire goes

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6ya6ya
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Yazz226
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SOURCE: F-150 oxygen sensor diagrams

will help u in a moments time

Posted on Jun 29, 2008

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mikedurland
  • 481 Answers

SOURCE: I have to change the

  • green = ground (attach directly to the case, should be a green painted screw near the opening
  • red = hot 110v connect to the red on the dryer
  • black = hot 110v connect to the black on the dryer
  • white = neutral connects to the blue (only if the blue is in the middle)
  • neutral is always in the middle with a hot wire on either side of it.
  • also make sure all the connections are tight
let me know if you need more help Mike

Posted on Jul 02, 2008

al_kupchella
  • 843 Answers

SOURCE: The 3-way dimmer switch has 4 wires; 1-red,

Incoming white - outgoing white This is the neutral, which just passes through without connecting to the switch
incoming black - switch black the hot wire provides power to the switch
switch red - outgoing red a traveler, will have power when toggle is one position
switch yellow - outgoing black
the other traveler, will have power when toggle is in the other position
incoming bare - switch green - outgoing bare the switch is grounded and it passes through

If this was helpful, please vote.

Posted on Mar 23, 2010

  • 8404 Answers

SOURCE: 120v hot tub wiring diagram

I would expect your tub is either 110 or 220. Currently you are set up for 110. Based on that ... you disregard the red wire.

If your tub can run on 220, you should run it on 220 as this is more economical.

You should probably have an electrician check this out and make any changes to assure proper and SAFE operation of your tub. You are using a GFI, correct?

Thanks for your interest in FixYa.com

Posted on May 16, 2010

SOURCE: I am replacing an old intermatic model EJ341

GE 15086 is a 7-day programmable timer. It has more wires than spring-wound timer because clock motor runs on 120V circuit, just like ordinary electric clock. The clock on spring wound timer operated by a spring.
f7d4104.jpg


If I understand correctly, the old timer has 2 wires. One of these wires is the Hot wire ... and that wire will connect to GE timer black wire.
The other wire from old timer goes to Load ... and that wire will go to GE timer red wire.

Instructions on a lot of these timers say, it timer doesn't work, then reverse the two wires described above ... this is because timer only works when Timer black connects to Hot.

You can also turn on power and test each wire that came off old switch to bare ground wire. When tester lights up, that is Hot wire.

GE timer Green wire connects to bare ground wire.

Moving on to GE timer white wire. This wire is necessary for the clock to run. This wire connects to Neutral wire which is usually white. You can test for Neutral by testing Hot wire to each white wire in box ... when tester comes on, that is Neutral.

If you do not have a white Neutral wire, then connect GE timer white wire to bare ground wire. This is not code, but it will work fine until you hire electrician to run Neutral into box.

Posted on Oct 04, 2010

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1 Answer

How do i replace the power cord in an rv that has been cut off


3 wire cord or 4 wire cord?
3 wire would be normally 120 volts
4 wires would be 240 volts
don't know if that would be common in an RV? If 120, is it 15 amp or 20 amp?
Again, would not know if 20 A would be found in an RV? If 20 A you would have one position in the cord - Sideways.

Any with the presumption 120 Volt - Same for either 15A or 20 A , Black wire onto Gold lug.
White wire onto Silver lug.
Green wire onto Green lug

if 220, comment back

May 30, 2015 | Atwood GCH10A-4E GCH10A4E Gas and Electric...

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.
Comment by gotgeek2, posted on Jan 08, 2010ckuzkuz, I'm a licensed master electrician in 2 states with 30 years in the trade. I've installed a lot of Intermatic timers over the years. I wrote this tip because I saw that a lot of folks were having problems wiring them.

on Mar 07, 2010 | Garden

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


These instructions are for USA residential wiring only.

VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.

on Dec 28, 2009 | Hardware & Accessories

1 Answer

I have a new heater with diferant terminals from the old one so not sure how to atach the wires


There is no need to rewire the internal of the heater!
Just bring in the electrical supply to the heater, it can be either 120 or 240 volts.
If the heater you have is like the picture associated with your post, then all then have to do is change the supplied plug from 240 to 120. It comes pre set for 240. That plug is inside the cabinet.

If any other brand, then you need to change the wires at the transformer of the heater. All heaters need to be supplied with primary voltage: 120 or 240. Then the control system is supplied with secondary voltage out of the transformer. The secondary voltage is no more than 28 volts. and these wires are normally colored as blue or yellow.

Secondary power is already wired within the heater. NO need to change where they are. You will only need to deal with the Primary wiring.

There are many varieties of transformers that transform high primary voltage to a low secondary voltage of 28 volts. and these transformers have many wires: primary & secondary.
I will try to make this easy to understand.

If you have a Gas Heater Transformer with these colors:
  • Red
  • Black
  • White
  • Green
Or...
  • Red
  • White with Red Stripe
  • Black
  • White with Black Stripe
  • Green
These are Dual Voltage Transformers, you can bring in either 120 Volts or 240 Volts

If you bring in only 120 Volts...
1st example:
The Red wire will not be used! Hot wire to the Black, and the Neutral/Common, to the white wire. Green to ground.

2nd example:
Connect the Red wire with the White with Red Stripe together and connect these to the incoming Neutral/Common wire, normally White.
Connect the Black Wire with the White with Black Stripe to your incoming Hot Wire, which is normally Black.
Green to ground

If you bring in 240 Volts...
1st example.
1 Hot wire to the Red, the Other Hot wire to the Black, and White wire is not used. Green to ground

2nd Example:
Wire nut the two Striped wires together. then one incoming Hot wire to the Black, the other incoming Hot wire to Red.
Green to ground

Or This is only a Low voltage - 120 Volts Only
  • Black
  • White
  • Green
Or either any of these combinations...
  • 2 Blacks w/Green
  • 2 Reds w/Green
  • 1 Black, 1 Red w/green
This type will only be a high voltage, 240 volts only
Picture below is what a transformer looks like and it is where your incoming supply wires go. The smaller leads with the spade connections will go to a specific location & is the 'Secondary" .

Good Luck



25568369-di2jpn2pb5nzkrgf0hzbmyq5-3-0.jpg

Mar 14, 2015 | Pool & Spa

1 Answer

I have a 12 inch chraftsman table saw with 2 wires coming from motor. The wiring diagram inside the cap shows it to be wired for 240 how do I wire that thru a switch and to a three wire recepticle


Not quite sure what your question is - Are you trying to plug a 240 into a 110/120 outlet? Or are you trying to plug this into a 240 3 prong outlet?

Traditionally, table saws don't come with a power cord - you must supply one. Usually on the motor there is a metal plate that describes volts/amps/phase/hp etc. Get the Volts/Amps from this plate, then measure the approximate distance between your table saw and the 240 outlet. The gauge of the power cord depends upon the Volt/Amps and the length of the cord. There are many volts/amps vs length for wire gauge conversions on the net. I always get a bigger wire (smaller gauge) than what is recommended. Expect to pay $100 or more for the cord (don't be cheap here). If you have an under rated cord, you can start a fire, burn up your motor, melt plugs into outlets and have to replace the outlet (don't ask how I know).

I'm a little suspicious of the "white and black" wire from 240 - it's usually "white and red" with a "black" ground. 240 is made from two 120's - opposite sine wave. So black is usually the common ground, while the white and red are the two 120's. Volts between white-red=240, white-black=120, red-black=120. If you're absolutely sure that white-black=240, then you can just connect a ground wire to the motor case. Many home table saws can be wired for 240 or 120 - you need to make sure that you're hooking 240v to the correct wires. If you're uncertain at all, then don't do it.

I have wired 120 to a 240 motor by accident and the motor ran - it had no power and didn't spin at full RPM. You can damage a motor this way, so I wouldn't recommend it. I have never put 240 to a 120 motor - so I don't know what happens (guessing you could burn up the motor coils).

With all that being said, if you have 240 outlet with 3 wire receptacle, then just use a multi-meter to determine the 2 "hot" and the 1 ground. Volts from hot1-hot2=240, hot1-ground=120, hot2-ground=120. If you don't have a multi-meter, buy one (approx $12). Once you have it wired up, then try the motor by flipping the switch on then off again. If the motor didn't spin, then you did something wrong. If it hummed but didn't spin, you have some connections wrong inside of the motor. If it spins the wrong way, then your wiring inside of the motor is wrong (doesn't help to flip the wires on the outlet). If you blew a circuit breaker, then the wiring to the motor is wrong.

Sep 27, 2014 | Saws

1 Answer

Coleman furnace


Reverse polarity means the power wires coming to the furnace are connected backwards. The black wire should the hot ( 120 volt line) . The white wire should be the neutral. The green should be the ground. Check these connections and test them to make sure they are correct. You should get 120 volt reading between the black and white.120 volts between the black and green and 0 volts between the white and green. Hope this helps.

Jan 02, 2014 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Replaced fan motor for outdoor ac unit old fan has blue,black,red,and green wires new fan has brown,black,yellow,brown/white and green what goes where


Hi, the 2 - brown wires are for there own run capacitor they should have sold you. One of the browns will have a white stripe. The new cap has only 2- terminals and you put a brown on each side. The black and yellow wires are both hot which 1- will go to 120 volts on the load or out side of the contactor, and the same with yellow, 120 volts. This gives you 220 volts to run the motor. Look on the new motor and you will have a diagram or on a paper that comes in the box. The old motor used the dual cap to run the compressor to. The green is just a ground wire. Screw it to any metal part or screw. You should be able to put the black and yellow hot wires where the old black, red, or blue were as long as they are 120 volts which I am sure they are. Get a cheap tester when you go get the cap for the new motor, and check the old blk, red, and blue terminals to ground and you should have 120 volts on at least 2 of them. Put the new yellow to 1 and black to another, browns to the new cap and your off and running. Keep me posted. I do this everyday. Please be kind when rating me, thank you.
Shastalaker7
A/C, Heating Contractor

Jul 09, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

T103 clock not working


Please read all of this post. You may burn up the 120 volt T103 timer motor is you are not careful.

The statement: "I have 120v board with 120 constant and 240 timed" is not very clear to me as to what you mean.

In US residential wiring, the white wire is not always the "neutral;" The white wire is sometimes used for 240 volt circuits.

We cannot tell you how to wire your timer unless we know _exactly_ what you have.

If your incoming supply cable (from the breaker box) has 3 wires (black, white, and bare), there are two scenarios:

1...If the voltage from black (hot) to white (ALSO hot in this case) is 240 volts, and you have only 3 wires (black, white, and bare), then the T103 is the _wrong_ timer if you are trying to control a 240 volt load. You should use a T104 timer.

The T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor and the T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor.

2...If the voltage between black and white is 120 volts, then you will only be able to control 120 volt loads; then the incoming black supply wire is connected to terminal 3 and the white (neutral) wire is connected to the "A" terminal. The bare equipment grounding wire is then connected to the "GR" terminal.

To show the difference, if you are trying to control a 240 volt load, to use a T103 and wire it _correctly_, you would need to have a incoming supply cable with a total of 4 wires (black, red, white (neutral), and bare) Black to red would be 240 volts. Black to white would be 120 volts. Red to white would be 120 volts.
The connections would be as follows:
White (neutral in this case) to the "A" terminal
Black to terminal 1
Red to terminal 3
The 240 volt load would then connect to terminals 2 and 4
Both the bare equipment grounding wires are connected to the "GR" terminal.

Since you did not mention a red wire, I can only ASSUME that this is not the case.

Sorry, we can't tell you how to wire this timer based upon assumptions.

So, what do you have?


Dec 23, 2009 | Intermatic T103 Indoor 120-Volt 40-amp...

1 Answer

Wire wayne 1.5 hp irrigation motor.


Your wires- Black=hot, White=common, bare copper wire=ground.
Motor wires- Black=hot, White=common.

Connections: Black to black, white to white, bare copper from line in to motor frame.

The wires from the motor should have been designed to carry the power load. Heavier wiring is always an option, to a point.
Regards, --W/D--

Jul 20, 2009 | AO Smith 1 1/2 HP 115/230V 56C Replacement...

1 Answer

Have a 1991 Jacuzzi 2 HP 220/110 pump. need wiring help


If you are running a 120 volt line then there is no way it could run 240. Did you wire it yourself? A 240 would have a hook up in the box for a red hot wire, a black hot wire, a white neutral, and a green or copper ground wire.

A 120 would have a white neutral , a black hot, and a green or copper ground wire. It wired correctly, you may need to replace the capacitor. But be certain you have cut the power to the circuit off at the panel.

Jun 04, 2009 | Home

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