Question about Teac AG-V8080 Receiver

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1 channel noise

Every time I turn it on, there's a noise in one channel even with no input signal provided. I can't get it to service 'cos we in Russia have no Teac Audio customer support. Hope someone can help me to find schematic diagram. Maybe it's possible to fix it with some welding. Thanks.

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SOURCE: Teac Receiver lost AM and FM

Well, if your unit had that happen, it sounds like it is possible. ;)

I would imagine that the radio, like all the other inputs, is in itself a separate unit or circuit board. If something fails on it, it probably wouldn't harm other inputs or the actual amplification itself... just a guess on my but it makes sense. A repair shop could probably open up the case and visually inspect the tuner circuits to make sure there isn't a short or dead something somewhere.

If there is still sound in Jim's case, I would try a different antenna and/or make sure its hooked into the correct antenna hookup. if sound but antenna change doesnt help, it could still be an internal but maybe simply problem.

i'm no pro but that's my 2cents

Posted on Jun 01, 2008

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SOURCE: Teac AG-V8520

same problem exactly

Posted on May 31, 2010

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I have a Kenwood KR-V9030 and the right channel is crackling and will not provide increased output when the volume is turned up. 1) Swaped speakers from left to right and the problem is in left speakers...

There is a chance that a common control may have developed a high-resistance or 'dead' spot and is causing your symptom. Turn the POWER OFF and operate every control throughout its range a number of times, especially rarely-used ones like Tape Monitors and the Mute control.

If it still doesn't work you might want to prove if its a low-level signal loss or a high level amp failure.

One way would be to run an RCA cable pair from the Tape Out to any other device (even a TV with speakers) you might have that accepts an audio input. If IT can't detect receive the DEAD Channel you're losing it in the preamplifying or source selection stages.

If it CAN be played externally, the receiver is losing it on its way to or at the amplification stage. Further isolation would require hands-on technical expertise.

Apr 16, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers


Adding channels to your box t eurovox or digivox

ok so hopefully you have everything up and running but you dont seem to have all the channels that you should have so you step1 press menu then press installalation then manuall installalation scrool down to input code step 2 input the no. that you are receiving a signal from this will be highlighted with the two bars at the bottom saying signal strength and quality step3 the no.that are highlighted ie.330.00 you add 300 to each of the ones that are highlighted ie.330.300 then scroll down to where it says scan this will more than likely say disabled press >on your remote to set to enable then press scan step 4 you should repeat this with all the channels that are showing signal input each no. then add 300 with your remote and any channels you are missing will come in if not even get you more channels than you allready have after you have done all the frequencys you should have added a few more channels when finished exit exit back to main screen and enjoy

on Apr 28, 2010 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

To reduce background noise from an audio mixer

when you say background noise I assume you mean the inherant noise that electronics produce. the the first thing to do is to make sure that all you input connections are shielded type, you don't need to spend money on gold plated connections, but do buy cables that are made with stranded wire and of decent size, bigger (fatter) is better when it comes to minimizing high frequency losses. Next, calibrate your inputs one at a time with a 1000hz signal that is 0db inn level. You can find this signal online through a search. you can also buy small plug in devices that produce this signal at 0 db (that is Zero Decibles) this is a common reference for "consumer" grade mixers, If you can't or don't want to spend any money on this you can use a signal from any tone generator, and some mixers have them built it. If you don't have any of the former, here is what you can do. turn all you mixer controls to 0 (zero) detent. in other words, flat, no treble, no bass, no midrange. on your inputs there should be input level knobs, these woule be set to thier lowest positionn if using a line input signal. if a microphone that level would be different, but wait on that for a bit. now have all you input knobs (or sliders) at minimum level. Now turn on your amplifer (if your using one) or what ever you monitor the output with. Headphones is a good choice as you can hear everything.
You should hear nothing. (nothing is supposed to in the inputs yet) if you hear noise take note of what it sounds like. turn the sound output level out (if headphones, turn up to a high level) and listen again. is the noise white (hiss) or hum (low freqency) if you have no noise, you have a good mixer and that is what it should be.
No plug in your first input, this is your choice but I would suggest you plug in microphone, now turn it up to the point where you can hear your own voice, you should hear just that, and maybe anything in the backgroud (furnace, tv, etc_) the quieter your environment, the better you can adjust this. Remember you will now need to turn up the input level. If you have meters you should be able to adjust the input to register in the green without turning red, a litlle yellow once in awhle is ok.
If this is quiet and clean you are ready to move on. turn that mic down to zero, but leave the input where you set it.
now plug in a line level source (your tape player,/cd player/ but don't use your computer as a source (yet). without anything playing on your machines you should hear very little noise in your headphones, if you hear a lot of noise you have bad cables.
Now play something through the tape/cd player, what ever and turn up the slider (not the input) this should give you a level,again in the green, with a little yellow, NO RED
once finished with this turn it back down and go to the next input. this time plug in your computer which most likely is coming from the green jack on the back (or front) of your PC/Mac or whatever. computers are very noisy machines, and just being close to one is sometimes enough to cause noise in a high gain system. anyway, plug in your computer and listen, you should hear some noise and I'd be surprized if this wasn't the source of your problem. make sure your volume level on the output of your pc is set to maximum, this will give you an advantage when recording. now turn up the slider on this input and listen for the noise level. good cables are important here and also the price of your computer may be reflected here as well since more expensive machines are better filtered and therefor produce less noise.
play a sound file (windows audio samples are noiseless and clearn) so use them if you can find thiem, look in your music folder for the sample files
You may hear some noise but your mixer is now set up at optimum and should give you nice sound if it is a quality mixer, good luck, Keith

Mar 24, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

How to connect microphone to Yamaha RX-V365 as a PA system.

Home-theatre receivers don't have microphone inputs. If you want to use the receiver as an amplifier in PA system, you need to use some kind of mic pre-amp or a mixer with mic inputs.
For PA mixer is needed anyway almost every time and all mixers have at least one mic input (with a pre-amp). Mixers have line-level output(s), which you can connect to the analog input of receiver.
Using receiver as an amp in PA has advantage that you have 5 channel amp. When using high sensitive PA speakers (as oposed to less sensitive Hi-fi home speakers), you can get good performance with the power rating of receiver. You could even use 2 separate channels for subwoofers and 2 channels for satelite speakers - but for that you would need a receiver with 5.1 analog inputs and special device called crossover which would divide the output from mixer into low-frequency signal and high-frequency signal which you would then connect to the front and rear analog inputs. But with RX-V365 you can use only 2 channels with analog input

Sep 15, 2010 | Yamaha Rx-v365 A/V Home Theater Receiver

1 Answer


you have to make sure you are on the theater mode on your amp. that's the only time that the center speaker works

Jun 10, 2010 | Pioneer VSX-818V-K Receiver

1 Answer

Left channel faiure - no sound

If you have sound from one channel it is probably not a catastrophic failure of the output stages. 

First isolate the problem. Does it occur with all inputs? If so, it is at a common stage after the input switch. Otherwise, it is before the input switch. 

Do you have  anything patched into the signal path between the pre-amp and amplifier, such as a recorder or equalizer? If so, bypass it or remove it and see if that solves the problem.

Also, sometimes the metal contact surfaces in switches oxidize and collect contaminents, causing and interuption to the signal path. Make sure the volume isn't cranked, and then work the controls back and forth - if the channel comes back, even briefly, there's a good chance you can either clean it sufficiently by working the control or better, getting a can of contact cleaner from Radio Shack or the equivalent, removing the covers of the receiver (after pulling the plug), and spray the cleaner into each control before working the control back and forth a half-dozen times. With really bad controls, this can even cause the sound quality to improve.

If this doesn't isolate the problem, its time to take it to a qualified tech.

Nov 01, 2009 | Onkyo TX-DS656 Receiver

1 Answer

Noisy channel of receiver

Generally, crackling noises come from anyplace there is a mechancial connection for the sound signal. The volume control, main/remote speaker switch and possibly the headphone jack. That is where the contacts must be cleaned, but it requires dissassembly. Try operating the main/remote speaker switches, and plug/unplug a headphone several times. I am assuming there is still audio behind that crackling. Are you using both main and remote speakers simultaneously?

Apr 09, 2008 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Pioneer VSX-D702s receiver - no sound - need help/circuit plan

The unit is in what is called "protect" mode. A problem was detected in the final output stage and that stage is turned off. The most common reason for this is failed output transistors. This is a simple repair for any repair shop and will cost about $10-$15 for parts plus the local labor charge. Expect that the output transistors plus a few supporting parts to be replaced. Most of the time, only one channel is badm, but due to the design of the protection circuit, both channels are turned off.

Apr 01, 2008 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Back channel turn off and on

Same problem with the 2.1 channel DRA-297. All sound cuts off and screen reads h/p input. I don't even know what that means. What's wrong here?

When it happens, the receiver makes a clicking noise. it goes back and forth from being on to h/p input shutdown. sounds like someone repeatedly flicking a lightswitch.

Thanks to whoever can help!

Jan 28, 2008 | Denon AVR-1700 Receiver

2 Answers

Denon AVR 1803

Hello, I think that you've got a problem in the relay circutry or a logic problem. tell ya what I ve got the service manual and schematic for the reciever. the engineers at denon where ahead of there time when this company started. they designed the equipment around what they wanted the specs to be for signal to noise and discrete audio channels. each of the sound channels from the component and composite inputs is given its own bus and amplifier channels. these paths are also common to the reciever/tuner outputs. one question though you mentioned that the composite/component video paths are not switching from the input to the output youve designated, and that the monitor checks good. do you have another video source,either digital or analog that you can input throgh another channel to see if it is infact a switching problem. try that and let me know. I can give you help with the switching circutry form the schematic if need be. believe me I know It took me about a week to track down the service schematic for this unit. Denon doesn't like giving out info unless you are an authorized repair center.

Dec 17, 2007 | Denon AVR-1803 Receiver

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