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Removal of atomic neox ski bindings, 10-15 years old. I have removed toe and heel pieces but am stuck on removal of the flat plastic base plate which is attached directly to the ski

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SOURCE: Atomic 4tix 310 binding toe adjustment.

Did you ever figure out how to adjust the toe piece? I am having the same problem

Posted on Mar 10, 2010

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Binding adjustment


There is (should be) a screw visible on each of the toe and heel pieces when looking down from directly above. That screw will adjust the height of the piece that clamps down on the top of the tabs on the heel and toe of your ski boots. For proper height measurement, use a credit card (or similar thickness card) and make sure you can somewhat freely slide the card side-to-side under your boot when it is in the binding and clamped down as when you are skiing. Too much play, and you will feel a sloppyness while skiing. Too little and you risk the binding not releasing properly caused by stiction. You can find demonstrations on YouTube also.

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I need toe and heels for nordica syntech f8 ski boots size 190.0 - 190.5. where do i order them?


You can order them from amazon, click here and take a look: Amazon com nordica. Wish you best of luck. Smith

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1 Answer

Snowboard boots with reduced length


You may also want to look at how you are setting up your bindings. I have a US 11 foot (29 cm) and with my bindings set correctly have never had any issues with toe or heal drag.

The best way to set up your bindings it to take them off, remove the mounting screws, keep the base plates in and fit your boots into your bindings with the straps still undone. Then, with the board on the floor, position the binding at the angle you like (roughly) and look to see when the toe and heel over lap is even or if you are like me pull the bindings back slightly so that you have little or no toe drag and just little heel drag. It works a treat and I have done this for over a hundred customers over the years.

Mar 15, 2010 | Burton Boxer Snowboard Boots

1 Answer

Atomic 4tix 310 binding toe adjustment.


Did you ever figure out how to adjust the toe piece? I am having the same problem

Mar 08, 2010 | Sport & Outdoor - Others

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Replacing plastic strap that hold the toe cap.


You just need to remove the binding form the board and look underneath the binding. If it doesn't drop out by itself just lever the broken piece out with a flat head screw driver. Once this is done you can insert the new part screw on the cap strap

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1 Answer

Vertical adjustment on front binding. Salomon S810 Ti


If you can adjust vertical pressure then you should adjust it as follows.
Put a piece of normal paper (like A4 printer paper) on the toe bit (and heel for that matter) and clip in the boot so that the paper sits between the boot sole and the binding base surface. You should be able to pull the paper out from between the boot and binding without ripping the paper, but obviously without there being a noticeable gap.
If in doubt take it to a ski tech, a bit of cash might save you a broken leg! They might even be able to help you or advise free of charge.

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1 Answer

Plastic toes strap broke off, where to find a piece to replace it


Have you tried the local ski shop they should have them.. other wise if theyre burtons try contacting them directly and ask them. if theyre not try the manufacturer but i doubt that will do anything. Do you have a scheels around? I know they carry straps.

Jan 16, 2009 | Park Raiden Bindings 0 Snowboard Binding

1 Answer

Snowboard bindings types


"Strap Bindings Highback Bindings The Strap Bindings is the original and still the most popular Binding System in Snowboarding. This is because Strap Bindings are not only adjustable and very secure, they are also comfortable. Nowadays, this Type of Bindings is designed to be lighter and stronger. Strap Bindings consists of a contoured baseplate where a rider can place his Soft Boots upon. At the back of the baseplate is a vertical plate (the highback) that rises behind your ankles and lower calves. The highbacks on Snowboard Bindings secure the heel of your feet and the backside of your lower legs. It also helps you to force the heel side edge of the board into the Snow Surface and brings the toe side of the board up. At the front of the binding are two or three adjustable straps which can be used to secure the front side of your feet and ankles to the Snowboard. Initially, you may have to sit down to strap in, but with a bit of practice, it'll be easier to strap in while standing. Strap Bindings can differ in the number of straps, the shape of the base, and highback plate. Alpine riders who need to perform high speed turns will prefer taller and stiffer highbacks for greater control and improved edge control. On the other hand, Freestylers will want a shorter backplate for more flexibility and turning power. Most people go for these kinds of bindings as they are more common, offer excellent control, and offer more options when it comes to boots-bindings combinations. The combination of the highback plate and the front side straps gives great control. This Type of Bindings is used in combination with Soft Boots. As the Binding gives all the support needed, the Snowboard Boots can remain soft and comfortable. Keep in mind that the Best Strap Bindings have ample amounts of wide padding at the toe and ankle straps. Step-In Bindings Step In Bindings It is quite hard to get into Strap Bindings since you need to loosen and tighten the straps every time you get into and out of your bindings. This is why Step-in Bindings were developed. This Type of Snowboard Bindings allow you to simply step down and click into it, thus making it easier for you to get on and off your snowboard. With this feature, Step-in Binding Systems have become quite popular with rental shops because they often give the beginners fewer Snowboard Equipment to fuss with. Still, while Step-In Bindings give you additional speed and can save you from a load of hassle, you pay for these conveniences when it comes to snowboard control. Step-in Bindings don't have any straps to give additional support, making the Snowboard Boot less flexible, and thus, harder to do Snowboarding Tricks. So make sure you get a good fit if you're planning to buy this. Step-in Bindings usually work in combination with soft boots which are somewhat stiffer than those used with highback bindings. When you opt for Step-in Bindings, you narrow your selection in choosing Snowboard Boots and Bindings since they both have to be ""step-ins"". However, there are some higher and more advanced Step-in Bindings out on the market that provide the best of both worlds. Step-ins can be used for either Freeride or Freestyle riders. Cross-over skiers will often feel comfortable with Step-in Bindings and boots since they are used to stepping in and to harder boots and just turning a switch or a latch whenever they want to get out. Flow-In Bindings Flow In Bindings Flow-In Bindings is quite new and is a hybrid of the step-in and strap systems. This Type of Snowboard Bindings tries to combine the control of Strap Bindings with the ease of Step-in Bindings. Flow-In Bindings look rather similar to Strap Bindings and also allow you to use soft boots. The notable difference is that, unlike the two or three straps that cover the top of your feet in Strap Bindings, the Flow-in Bindings have only one large tongue that covers a large part of the top of your Snowboard Boot. Getting into and out of your Bindings is a matter of flipping the highback backwards and entering or exiting your boot. Flow-in Bindings are becoming more popular as the choices and Techniques of Snowboarding improve. People love the Flow-in System as it combines all the advantages of the Strap Bindings with the ease of Step-ins. One disadvantage however is that Flow-in Bindings are more difficult to adjust than strap-ons. Plate Bindings Plate Bindings Plate Bindings, also known as Hard-Boot Bindings, consist of a hard baseplate, steel bails, and a heel or toe lever. This Type of Bindings is used in combination with Hard Boots that can be inserted into the bails. By flipping the lever, the boots are strapped firmly into the Bindings. The features of the Plate Bindings are the closest to a traditional Ski Binding and their rigid responsiveness provides maximum leverage and power for high-speed carving and riding on hard snow. Plate Bindings and hard boots are mostly preferred by Alpine Racers who need the extra edge control that they get from this combination. Baseless Bindings This Type of Bindings was introduced in the mid 1990's by several companies. In Baseless Bindings, the sole of the Snowboard Boot is placed in direct contact with the Snowboard deck by removing the Binding's baseplate. With this, the sole height is lowered by up to 1/8 of an inch. Theoretically, using the Baseless Bindings enhances the ""feel"" of your Snowboard's flex. However, this Type of Snowboard Bindings aggravates ""toe drag"" problems for people with large feet. Also, most Baseless Bindings are far more difficult to adjust (stance angle/width) than traditional ""4x4"" designs. Still, Halfpipe and park riders prefer Baseless Bindings because it provides them with a quicker edge response. The choice of what Type of Snowboard Bindings to use usually comes down to personal preference and finding the right Snowboard Boot first. If you feel that the convenience of stepping in outweighs the additional control you can gain, then it is best to go for that particular Style of Binding. Regardless of which Type of Binding System you wind up with, don't head for the slopes until you know exactly how to get in and out of them. With or Without Highbacks? The large curved piece of plastic screwed to the base of the binding is the Highback. Its main function is to give riders some control over their Snowboard's Heel Edge. These can be found on all Bindings or are built into the boot with some Step-in Systems. Alpine riders who need to perform high speed turns will prefer taller and stiffer Highbacks for greater control and improved edge control. On the other hand, Freestylers will want a shorter backplate for more flexibility and turning power. Snowboard Boots and Bindings form a combination wherein not all Kinds of Bindings are suited for each type of Snowboard Boot. It is often best to buy them together. In here, knowing your intended Snowboarding Style is crucial before buying a combination of boots and bindings. "

Dec 01, 2008 | Flow M9 Snowboard Binding

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