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Ms210 has spark with tester plugged into it.put anew plug on no spark.new coil.all wiring new flywheel ok not broken.gapped correctly.coil wiring new.good block ground?

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 41 Answers

SOURCE: Spark plug gap for 94 Nissan Altima

The correct spark plug gap is .044

Posted on Nov 24, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Rear cylinder not firing

95 Evo, new plugs, new wires, started backfireing like a machine gun, front cyl. no spark at plug sometimes - would this be the coil, have not ohmed the coil yet . Thanks

Posted on May 13, 2009

panilling9
  • 284 Answers

SOURCE: no spark

leave your killswitch wire not hooked up and try?
check the flywheel key way and be sure it is aligned perfectly with the key way on the crankshaft
if it is you are in time
if not its out of time (timing off)
since it didnt work with the air gap at .014 go closer and set at .012 and see what happens
be sure to adj. the air gap at the magnet part of the flywheel and ign. module and secure module at a setting you want

Posted on Jun 13, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: no spark at spark plug center of Coil

2000 ford escort ZX2. 4cyl . No spark at the spark plug. Wires are good.

Posted on Aug 29, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: 19-95 KLF300 ATV Kawasaki 4x4 no spark put new ignitor unit on.

i ******* hate my kawasaki kdx 125 1992 there is no spark and i dont no wot it needs ive bought a cdi for it an it wernt that and i bought a new coil and it wernt that either could anyone help me please

Posted on Sep 11, 2009

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Fs38 Stihl weed trimmer extremely very hard to pull with sparkplug in but no problem with no plug.


A hard pull on that unit would indicate a sheared flywheel key. The key is part of the flywheel. Check to see if there are 'rub or scrape' marks on the outside of the flywheel. Adjust coil clearance to .010". Coils on those models are normally very reliable. Use a spark tester for lawn mower engines. Preferably with a light in the center of the tester wire. If it its an adjustable tester, adjust the gap to at least .065 to 0.85". The light tester should produce a bright orange light, the adjustable tester should produce a bright blue spark. I cannot find specs on those models, as dealers use the 'light in wire' type tester.

Mar 07, 2017 | Stihl Garden

1 Answer

No fire on echo pb200 leaf blower


I would check to see if the spark plug is firing first off and if it is ok check the plug wire and make sure there is no damage to it. If that is ok then you probably have a bad coil. You can use a spark plug tester and see if you are getting fire from the coil if not you will need to replace it. If you change the coil be sure to note the air gap between the coil and the flywheel then set the new one to approx. the same distance. Hope this helps.

Sep 29, 2016 | Echo Garden

2 Answers

Will crank but fowls the plugs out without choking and will not fire


check for flooding in the carby-- faulty needle and seat and float

Apr 07, 2015 | Garden

1 Answer

Will not start, no fire


When a person says "I am not getting any spark", we have to assume this means the engine cranks whenever you turn the key. Or, it spins whenever you pull the rope.

A mechanically functional (meaning all the internal parts are working, i.e. pistons, valves, etc) engine requires a steady flow of three things, air, fuel, and spark in order for the engine to start and run. These are the trinity, or triad of a happy engine.

If you are in fact not getting spark, after you crank the engine, or pull the rope for a while, you should begin to smell the un-burnt gas passing through the engine. This is a good indication that you have gas flow and air is making it through the carburetor. That is a good thing. It is verification that you have air and fuel, but no spark. If you do not smell this fuel after a bit of cranking you may have fuel problems. Keep in mind that if you smell this fuel it means the cylinder(s) are now flooded and it's time to back off the choke and crank it in the run position.

BEFORE you begin your tests, consider the engines kill system. Modern day safety systems include a kill wire. This will be a single wire going to a connecting terminal on the coil. The wire is small and can be disconnected. Disconnecting this wire isolates the engine from all the possible bad switches, relays, diodes, and wiring setup designed to kill the engine if safety procedures are not followed. SOOO, you may want to run your spark plug test without taking off the engine shroud and disconnecting the kill wire. If you get a quick fix, great! If not you will need to remove the shroud before going through the rest of the tests. You must find and disconnect the kill wire, then begin your coil and spark plug tests again. If the engine starts and runs, then you have a chore in store. You will have to track down the faulty part in your safety system.

Note: it is likely, with a disconnected kill wire the engine may start, but when you turn the key off, or otherwise try to shut the machine off, the engine will keep on running. Just slip the kill wire terminal back on and the engine will die, or wait till it runs out of fuel.

Providing spark to the engine is one of the simple systems and relatively easy to diagnose. Start with the spark plug. You CANNOT test a spark plug (without expensive equipment in your lab). For instance, did you know that it takes more juice to create a spark under compression than it does at normal atmospheric pressure? So just because you have a visible spark from the plug outside the cylinder does not mean you have a usable spark under compression.

The ONLY answer to this end of the problem is to get a new one; even if the current one is not very old. Briggs & Stratton recommend changing the spark plug annually. The spark plug sits in the cylinder and is subjected to compression, high heat, explosive forces, constant vibration, and of course electric shock in the 15,000 volt range. Make sure the gap is set correctly on the new one, typically 0.76 mm (0.030 in).

If you want to know why you should just throw in the towel and start with a fresh spark plug, go here and read this wonderful essay on spark and spark plugs. Village Science Magneto Spark Plugs

So now you have your new plug, properly gapped and it still won't start. Next up is the Magneto or Coil. If you have not already done so, pull the shroud, or fan cover, from the top of your engine and you will see a heavy metal wheel with fan blades. This is the Flywheel/Magneto. It has permanent magnets embedded in the side. As the magnets fly passed the coil, current is generated. Seldom do the magnets go bad, but you should feel a strong attractive force of the magnets when you hold a screwdriver about an inch from the magnets. If they do not seem to be very strong you might have to replace the flywheel. This is a very rare happenstance.

Follow your spark plug wire back to the small metal thingy, mounted next to the flywheel, now you are at the Ignition Coil; or just Coil for short. TWIN cylinder engines have two Coils; one for each plug. A coil generates the 15,000 volts required by the spark plug. The Coil must be a precise distance from the flywheel. This is the Ignition Coil Gap. This gap usually .20 mm to .30 mm (.008-.012 in) from the flywheel. To set this gap properly, the magnets on the flywheel must be right in front of the coil when you set the gap. Check your specs. If the gap ain't right the spark ain't bright.

With the exception of the kill wire designed to stop the Coil from working, the Coil functions entirely independent of the rest of the wiring systems on the machine. If you disconnect the kill wire and the coil is good you will get spark to your engine regardless of the condition of the rest of the entire wiring system. The Coil works all by itself. It does not need the battery or the key switched on.

Inside the Coil are two windings of wire and no moving parts. With shorted (melted together inside) windings you can still get a spark, but it will be weak. With open (burnt/broken) windings, you get no spark at all. There are also electronic components like diodes which may be failing. Coils are subjected to heat and vibration and do fail on occasion. Another coil consideration is the spark plug wire. Back in the day, we would replace all our spark plug wires when we gave our car a tune up; because spark plug wires do fail. The only way to replace the spark plug wire on a mower is to replace the Ignition Coil.

Note: Coils may not fail completely at first.They can be complicit in the situation where a mower starts and runs for a while. As it heats up the coil parts expand and cause the engine to shut down. It does not re-start until the machine has cooled enough to allow the coil to cool. This can be 30 minute to several hours; perhaps it starts again the next day only to repeat the failure.

Short of a well running engine, with no special equipment, the only field-test for a coil and the spark plug wire output is to visually assess the color of the spark. Alternatively, you may use a spark tester. A spark tester gauges the strength of spark by making it jump a bigger gap. This test calls for a gap in the range of 4.2 mm (0.166 in). It's important to note that setting a test gap beyond 5.0 mm (0.200) could damage the ignition components. Briggs and Stratton manuals, for the newer engines, specifically state that you should not test for spark with the spark plug out. I do not know why this is. They specify you should use a spark tester.

B&S notwithstanding (at your own risk), with a new plug attached to the plug wire hold the threaded part against a ground point or wrap some bare copper wire around the threads and fasten the wire to the engine frame or other good ground.Make your shop or garage dark so you can see the spark easily, then crank the engine. The flywheel must spin rapidly (at least 350 RPM). The strength of the spark is revealed in the color. A red or yellow spark is weak and probably will not spark in the cylinder. A blue or white spark is strong and has enough voltage to fight across the spark plug gap even under pressure within the cylinder.

Note: a good strong spark also makes a strong snapping noise as it fires. With the kill wire removed and the Coil gapped correctly, if there is no spark at all with your new plug (try two new plugs in case one is faulty) it may be time to replace the coil.

One final note: On a twin cylinder engine you may have one side firing and not the other; quite common actually. You have the option of switching parts from one side to the other to help diagnose which part is bad. The spark will follow the good part; lack of spark will go with the bad part. It's important to note at this point, IF the safety system is at fault, neither side will spark. That's a clue.

That about covers it for diagnosing and curing a weak spark or no spark problem.

Mar 20, 2015 | Garden

1 Answer

No fire to engine


When a person says "I am not getting any spark", we have to assume this means the engine cranks whenever you turn the key. Or, it spins whenever you pull the rope.

A mechanically functional (meaning all the internal parts are working, i.e. pistons, valves, etc) engine requires a steady flow of three things, air, fuel, and spark in order for the engine to start and run. These are the trinity, or triad of a happy engine.

If you are in fact not getting spark, after you crank the engine, or pull the rope for a while, you should begin to smell the un-burnt gas passing through the engine. This is a good indication that you have gas flow and air is making it through the carburetor. That is a good thing. It is verification that you have air and fuel, but no spark. If you do not smell this fuel after a bit of cranking you may have fuel problems. Keep in mind that if you smell this fuel it means the cylinder(s) are now flooded and it's time to back off the choke and crank it in the run position.

BEFORE you begin your tests, consider the engine kill system. Modern day safety systems include a kill wire. This will be a single wire going to a connecting terminal on the coil. The wire is small and can be disconnected. Disconnecting this wire isolates the engine from all the possible bad switches, relays, diodes, and wiring setups designed to kill the engine if safety procedures are not followed. SOOO, you may want to run your spark plug test without taking off the engine shroud and disconnecting the kill wire. If you get a quick fix, great! If not you will need to remove the shroud before going through the rest of the tests. You must find and disconnect the kill wire, then begin your coil and spark plug tests again. If the engine starts and runs, then you have a chore in store. You will have to track down the faulty part in your safety system.

Note: it is likely, with a disconnected kill wire the engine may start, but when you turn the key off, or otherwise try to shut the machine off, the engine will keep on running. Just slip the kill wire terminal back on and the engine will die, or wait till it runs out of fuel.

Providing spark to the engine is one of the simple systems and relatively easy to diagnose. Start with the spark plug. You CANNOT test a spark plug (without expensive equipment in your lab). For instance, did you know that it takes more juice to create a spark under compression than it does at normal atmospheric pressure? So just because you have a visible spark from the plug outside the cylinder does not mean you have a usable spark under compression.

The ONLY answer to this end of the problem is to get a new one; even if the current one is not very old. Briggs & Stratton recommend changing the spark plug annually. The spark plug sits in the cylinder and is subjected to compression, high heat, explosive forces, constant vibration, and of course electric shock in the 15,000 volt range. Make sure the gap is set correctly on the new one, typically 0.76 mm (0.030 in).

If you want to know why you should just throw in the towel and start with a fresh spark plug, go here and read this wonderful essay on spark and spark plugs.
http://www.ankn.uaf.edu/publications/VS/magneto.html

So now you have your new plug, properly gapped and it still won't start. Next up is the Magneto or Coil. If you have not already done so, pull the shroud, or fan cover, from the top of your engine and you will see a heavy metal wheel with fan blades. This is the Flywheel/Magneto. It has permanent magnets embedded in the side. As the magnets fly passed the coil, current is generated. Seldom do the magnets go bad, but you should feel a strong attractive force of the magnets when you hold a screwdriver about an inch from the magnets. If they do not seem to be very strong you might have to replace the flywheel. This is a very rare happenstance.

Follow your spark plug wire back to the small metal thingy, mounted next to the flywheel, now you are at the Ignition Coil; or just Coil for short. TWIN cylinder engines have two Coils; one for each plug. A coil generates the 15,000 volts required by the spark plug. The Coil must be a precise distance from the flywheel. This is the Ignition Coil Gap. This gap usually .20 mm to .30 mm (.008-.012 in) from the flywheel. To set this gap properly, the magnets on the flywheel must be right in front of the coil when you set the gap. Check your specs. If the gap ain't right the spark ain't bright.

With the exception of the kill wire designed to stop the Coil from working, the Coil functions entirely independent of the rest of the wiring systems on the machine. If you disconnect the kill wire and the coil is good you will get spark to your engine regardless of the condition of the rest of the entire wiring system. The Coil works all by itself. It does not need the battery or the key switched on.

Inside the Coil are two windings of wire and no moving parts. With shorted (melted together inside) windings you can still get a spark, but it will be weak. With open (burnt/broken) windings, you get no spark at all. There are also electronic components like diodes which may be failing. Coils are subjected to heat and vibration and do fail on occasion. Another coil consideration is the spark plug wire. Back in the day, we would replace all our spark plug wires when we gave our car a tune up; because spark plug wires do fail. The only way to replace the spark plug wire on a mower is to replace the Ignition Coil.

Note: Coils may not fail completely at first. They can be complicit in the situation where a mower starts and runs for a while. As it heats up the coil parts expand and cause the engine to shut down. It does not re-start until the machine has cooled enough to allow the coil to cool. This can be 30 minute to several hours; perhaps it starts again the next day only to repeat the failure.

Short of a well running engine, with no special equipment, the only field-test for a coil and the spark plug wire output is to visually assess the color of the spark. Alternatively, you may use a spark tester. A spark tester gauges the strength of spark by making it jump a bigger gap. This test calls for a gap in the range of 4.2 mm (0.166 in). It's important to note that setting a test gap beyond 5.0 mm (0.200) could damage the ignition components. Briggs and Stratton manuals, for the newer engines, specifically state that you should not test for spark with the spark plug out. I do not know why this is. They specify you should use a spark tester.

B&S notwithstanding (at your own risk), with a new plug attached to the plug wire hold the threaded part against a ground point or wrap some bare copper wire around the threads and fasten the wire to the engine frame or other good ground. Make your shop or garage dark so you can see the spark easily, then crank the engine. The flywheel must spin rapidly (at least 350 RPM). The strength of the spark is revealed in the color. A red or yellow spark is weak and probably will not spark in the cylinder. A blue or white spark is strong and has enough voltage to fight across the spark plug gap even under pressure within the cylinder.

Note: a good strong spark also makes a strong snapping noise as it fires. With the kill wire removed and the Coil gapped correctly, if there is no spark at all with your new plug (try two new plugs in case one is faulty) it may be time to replace the coil.

One final note: On a twin cylinder engine you may have one side firing and not the other; quite common actually. You have the option of switching parts from one side to the other to help diagnose which part is bad. The spark will follow the good part; lack of spark will go with the bad part. It's important to note at this point, IF the safety system is at fault, neither side will spark. That's a clue.

That about covers it for diagnosing and curing a weak spark or no spark problem.

Mar 20, 2015 | Garden

1 Answer

Replaced coil an still no fire out of wire kill wire is not hooked up


Hello,
My name is Dane and I am going to help you solve your problem. Ok, there aren't many things that can cause you a problem here. First, I have to say to check that spark plug. Make sure it's correctly gapped and not cracked or fouled. Now, check that the flywheel is clean and rustfree. Make sure you have set the coil gap correctly.

To set the gap for the coil, get a regular business card and use it as a feeler gauge. Turn the flywheel so the flywheel magnets are away from the coil. Loosen the bolts to the coil, and pull the coil back, making the gap as large as possible. Rotate the flywheel so the magnets are next to the coil. Slide the business card in between the coil and the flywheel magnets and loosen the coil bolts. If your coil has 2 legs, make sure the business card is under them both. Make sure the coil is even and just snug against the card. Now tighten down your coil bolts and spin the flywheel to remove the business card. Turn the flywheel at least 1 complete turn and make sure it doesn't contact the coil. You're done!!! Put it back together and try it again. It's not unheard of to get a bad new coil. Don't think just because it's new it has to be good.
Well, I think this should get your problem fixed. Thank you! Dane

Dec 22, 2010 | Echo Pb - 413t Backpack Blower

1 Answer

Chipper was running great then shut down...now there is no spark...what might be the problem?...it was new this past spring


Use a spark tester and make sure there is no spark.If there is not then you need a new ignition coil.Take the side cover off and you will find the coil above the flywheel.remove the two screws and the wires to get it out.when you replace it you will have to set the air gap at .010-.012.most of the time when you buy anew one it comes with a guage with it.if not take a piece of metal or thin piece of cardboard that measures the right size.put new one back on .you should be able too slide it up and snug the screws enough to hold it in place then put your gauge in between the coil and flywheel.turn the flywheel until the magnet is in line with coil.loosen screws and the magnet will pull down the coil on top of gauge.tighten screws and rotate the flywheel to get gauge out.

Dec 19, 2010 | Troy-Bilt Chipper Shredder

2 Answers

No spark


If you have tested correctly for spark (either spark-tester tool or grounding plug to engine), then the problem is either 1. An incorrect air-gap setting between the coil module and the magnets on the flywheel 2. The coil module itself has become defective....so...take the machine covers off and access the coil/flywheel area and check to make sure there is a gap between them about the thickness of a regular business card (that is .012-.016"). Post back if needed!
Please vote on this solution.

Sep 11, 2010 | Homelite Mighty Lite Lawn Trimmer

2 Answers

46 cc Sears/Poulan chainsaw will not start


Four things I can think of:
1) There is a short in your spark plug wire. When you bend it to connect the plug in the machine it allows the exposed cable to contact the engine block. Examine the wire all the way to the coil.

2) Flywheel key is sheared ( you obviously know how to take off the flywheel since you checked the seals).

3) Flywheel air gap is not set correctly. Loosen the coil. Put the cover of a notebook or the cardboard piece of a cigarette pack between the magnetic portion of the flywheel and the coil. Tighten the coil down. This will get you the proper gap.

4) Your cylinder/piston or rings are scrubbed out. Even though it passed a compression test, on rare occasions it will loose compression only when it fires. So do the following:

Remove your exhaust manifold. Look into the cylinder with a flash light. You are looking for scratches. Anything larger then a light fingernail is definite proof you need a new cylinder/piston assy.

If it passes that test do the following:

Pour mixed fuel straight into your cylinder until 1/4 full. Slowly pull your saw over while looking into the cylinder. If you see bubbles after the ring/rings go by then you need a new cylinder/piston assy. On rare occasions if no scratches are present on the cylinder wall or piston, you may be able to change just the rings.

First if you can get a inline spark tester so you can see if your getting spark with the plug installed.

Mar 24, 2009 | Poulan Pro Chain Saw 46cc 20"

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