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Ajusting the let off on a pse baby g force

How do you adjust the let off on the pse baby g force mossy oak camo with the wood grip

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4 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

One Wire
  • 126 Answers

SOURCE: front cover and mike

This guy does a pretty good job with faceplate stickers. He has a lot of radios listed on his site, but if your radio is not listed, contact him, and he will see if he can come up with a template.

http://mtndewnutsales.com/Faceplate_Page.html

I have used him a couple times and he is pretty respectable.

Posted on Oct 11, 2008

al_kupchella
  • 843 Answers

SOURCE: Blade guide bushes melt/wear with hard wood

If these bushings are getting that hot, then you may have the wrong speed or a non-optimum blade. The blade pitch (number of teeth per inch) must be lower the thicker the wood is. If there are too many teeth trying to cut at the same time you have to push harder to get enough pressure to cut and that puts more force on the guide bushings. There are a variety of pitches available even for the narrower scrolling blades. If you have to move up to a wider blade, there is a little trick to help you cut a slightly smaller scroll radius - round off the back side of the blade with a sharpening stone.
Also, with oak, you may need to use a slower speed to keep the blade from heating up - although a hot blade will show up as more of a problem with the lower guide bushings only. Your saw might have multiple steps on the pulleys, allowing you to move the belt to a slower speed.
I hope this helps. Thanks for using Fixya. Good luck!
Al K

Posted on Mar 24, 2010

dontbother10
  • 2220 Answers

SOURCE: I cut mostly hard woods, oak, hickory etc. I just

Have the chain professionally sharpened (Stihl or Husqvarna) at a saw retailer (take your saw). While there ask them to verify the gauge of the bar and chain are the same. When you return to pick-up your chain bring a few pieces of wood. Ask them to make a few cookies with your saw. Please reply with the result.

If you have more questions or need additional help please reply below and I will get back to you. Thank you for using FixYa and Good Luck. HTH
Lou

Posted on Mar 28, 2010

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1 Answer

Blade guide bushes melt/wear with hard wood


If these bushings are getting that hot, then you may have the wrong speed or a non-optimum blade. The blade pitch (number of teeth per inch) must be lower the thicker the wood is. If there are too many teeth trying to cut at the same time you have to push harder to get enough pressure to cut and that puts more force on the guide bushings. There are a variety of pitches available even for the narrower scrolling blades. If you have to move up to a wider blade, there is a little trick to help you cut a slightly smaller scroll radius - round off the back side of the blade with a sharpening stone.
Also, with oak, you may need to use a slower speed to keep the blade from heating up - although a hot blade will show up as more of a problem with the lower guide bushings only. Your saw might have multiple steps on the pulleys, allowing you to move the belt to a slower speed.
I hope this helps. Thanks for using Fixya. Good luck!
Al K

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1 Answer

I want to know how to camouflage a jeep the best


Knowing how to paint a Jeep in camo patterns means you can hide your Jeep in the woods, marshy areas or in open fields without it being easily seen. Using Mossy Oak's Shadow Grass pattern, paint your Jeep with natural-looking shadows and grass blades. The 3-D look of this pattern allows you to easily hide your Jeep from water fowl, doves, deer and big game.

Things You'll Need:
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  1. Sand the surface of the Jeep with 120-grit sandpaper until the surface is dull. You can use a dual-action sander for this step to speed the process. This removes the top clear coat and prepares the surface for primer. Primer won't stick to a shiny surface.
  2. Mask off areas of the Jeep that won't be painted, such as the windows, tires and passenger area of the Jeep. Wipe the surface with wax and grease remover and a lint-free towel.
  3. Spray primer on the Jeep in three thin coats. Allow each coat to dry completely. Once the primer is dry, use 800-grit sandpaper to sand the top layer of primer until smooth. This leaves a smooth surface for the paint. Wipe again with wax and grease remover and a lint-free towel.
  4. Paint a thin base coat of gray on the Jeep. Cover all of the primered areas on the Jeep so that no primer can be seen. Allow the paint to dry.
  5. Go over the Jeep with brown paint, spraying small areas of brown paint in no particular pattern. The finished effect should look like the Jeep is equally painted gray and tan. Hold the first stencil against the Jeep and use black paint to fill it in. Move the stencil over and paint again. Start at the front of the Jeep and work towards the rear.
  6. Move on to the next stencil and use light tan paint to spray the grass pattern. The grass should start at the bottom of the Jeep and reach up towards the top. For longer grass, don't spray the tops of the grass but instead move the pattern up, spray the stems longer and then spray the tops, making the grass stems long. Repeat this around the Jeep and across the hood. Go back over the grass stems with black paint, lightly spraying a few of the stems to give them a shadow look.
  7. Finish by spraying three coats of clear coat paint onto the painted areas of the Jeep. This protects the paint from UV rays and keep the camo pattern looking good.

Tips & Warnings
  • Paint is best applied using a paint spray gun and air compressor, but canned spray paint will work.
  • Never sand or spray primer or paint without using a painter's respirator mask.

Resources: Customice Camo Stencils

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I really hope help you with this (remember rated this help) Good luck.

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