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My neebo redline light 5557 will not focus,lens just rattles around,will not focus as a beam or wide angle,what is missing or wrong,any parts diagram to show what is wrong? Thank You!

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New out of the box Cannon 550 with a 18-55mm 3.5 - 5.6 lens and I can only focus in the wide angle shot. The zoom to 55mm is out of focus even when set to AF and an automatic setting. Am I doing...


In automatic mode and automatic focus - The camera should focus onto the subject given that there's enough contrast between your subject and the background. If it not focusing at all even in broad day light conditions - You lens is faulty.
Also - Do you or your friend have another lens to test if the camera is faulty?

Feb 28, 2011 | Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 USN Lens

Tip

Explaining Camera Focus


Camera: Focus We've seen that a real image is formed by light moving through a convex lens. The nature of this real image varies depending on how the light travels through the lens. This light path depends on two major factors:
  • The angle of the light beam's entry into the lens
  • The structure of the lens
The angle of light entry changes when you move the object closer or farther away from the lens. You can see this in the diagram below. The light beams from the pencil point enter the lens at a sharper angle when the pencil is closer to the lens and a more obtuse angle when the pencil is farther away. But overall, the lens only bends the light beam to a certain total degree, no matter how it enters. Consequently, light beams that enter at a sharper angle will exit at a more obtuse angle, and vice versa. The total "bending angle" at any particular point on the lens remains constant. camera-diagram3.gif
As you can see, light beams from a closer point converge farther away from the lens than light beams from a point that's farther away. In other words, the real image of a closer object forms farther away from the lens than the real image from a more distant object. You can observe this phenomenon with a simple experiment. Light a candle in the dark, and hold a magnifying glass between it and the wall. You will see an upside down image of the candle on the wall. If the real image of the candle does not fall directly on the wall, it will appear somewhat blurry. The light beams from a particular point don't quite converge at this point. To focus the image, move the magnifying glass closer or farther away from the candle. camera-diagram2.gif
This is what you're doing when you turn the lens of a camera to focus it -- you're moving it closer or farther away from the film surface. As you move the lens, you can line up the focused real image of an object so it falls directly on the film surface. You now know that at any one point, a lens bends light beams to a certain total degree, no matter the light beam's angle of entry. This total "bending angle" is determined by the structure of the lens.




courtesy of HowStuffWorks.com

on Mar 21, 2008 | Canon PowerShot A520 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pro and cons of wide teleconverter lens


Great question! The Pros: -Gives you a wider angle of view on your built-in lens -Gives you the potential to have a shallower depth of field when you zoom in on an object. This is a lens effect which makes objects behind the subject appear less in focus than the subject in the foreground - can be a positive if you're trying to have a more cinematic-like effect
The Cons: -Apparent lens distortion around the frame edges. You'll notice a "bowing" effect happen. -Increased ability to have dust and scratches on your lens. Make sure both the front and rear element are clean! -Possible increase in light glare. If the sun is in the background, expect to see more lens-flare effects due to the lack of a lens shade, and the increased number of glass elements that the light needs to pass through.
Personally, I like having the wide angle adapter in my pro-sumer video camera kit because it gives me another option when I'm in close-quarters. If you can avoid lens flare, it will be great addition to your camera.

Feb 20, 2011 | Sony Mavica Wide Conversion Lens 0.7x...

1 Answer

Wide angle cap vs wide angle lens


The cap is a plastic disk, usually black or silver, that snaps on at the end of the lens to keep the lens clean. Some lenses have two caps, one for each end when not attached to the camera.
Some cameras don't use a "loose" cap; those cameras generally retract the lens into the camera body and "close" a door in front of the lens.
Many, if not most, camera users do not use a cap (my guess).

The wide angle lens is generally an "optional" lens that can be used for group or scenery pictures when you want to shoot a "wide" picture. A "normal" lens is generally around 50mm (plus / minus 5mm). A wide lens is anywhere from 17mm to 24mm (or so).

I recommend obtaining a wide lens... with a cap.

Hope this helps!







Sep 10, 2009 | Casio Exilim EX-Z57 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Disassembling a wide angle 50mm C lens for a RB 67


Are you a trained service tech? If not, step away from the lens and no one gets hurt. :-)

Aug 10, 2009 | Photography

1 Answer

Lens focusing problem


Dropping a camera is no laughing matter.  I assume you have severely damaged the wide angle lens, and the only solution I have it to purchase another one.   Certainly if the front element fell out that is serious and there are probably other things wrong with the lens, and continued use of it could damage the camera body.   Just be more careful and chock it up to experience and buy a new lens. Sorry to hear about your accident.   Good luck.

Apr 13, 2008 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

Focus problem


The factory presets would not have been affected by your grandson doing as you describe. Depending on what other lenses he might be trying to use, many have a separate switch located on the barrel of the lens to turn auto focus on or off.

Dec 25, 2007 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

Wide Angle Lenses


wide angle lens aka fish-eye lens, means only the centre of your photo is clearly focused - especially in long distance scenery shots.

Sep 13, 2005 | Kodak DC290 Zoom Digital Camera

1 Answer

S70 Macro Focus Problem?


The macro is good at 4cm at wide angle, 8inches at full telephoto(different distances for any focal length in between). I read that someplace in the manual, I believe.

Sep 11, 2005 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-S70 Digital Camera

1 Answer

S4 No Multiple Focus?


Acceptable focus depends on many things and an appreciation of aperture, lens, distance and shutterspeed is needed before understanding the finer points of 'depth of field' (what will and wont be in focus). Like all cameras, an auto focus camera cannot make everything sharp, it has to focus on one thing, usually in the middle, and the rest of the picture either falls in or out of focus, depending on the combination of the above points. For example, if you shoot on a wide-angle lens with a small aperture, say anything above f8, you should have everything you want in focus. In contrast, on a longer telephoto lens with a wide aperture (more light being allowed to hit the film or chip or whatever) the resulting picture will be sharp within only a few inches of the focus point. This can be really nice if you are shooting single portraits in bright light as the background will become extremely blurry and colourful. I am presuming that the shots you are concerned with had the camera settings set to wide aperture priority, possibly because it was dull or you had a 'sport mode' selected where fast shutterspeed is needed to catch rapid movement thus a wide aperture is needed to compensate and so shallow depth of field results. I don't know the camera you are using or whether you will understand any of the above. If you need a greater explanation of what is essentially a science, please let me know.

Sep 08, 2005 | Pentax Optio S4 Digital Camera

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