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Jvc l-A31 turntable volume not very loud, is connected to a amp with phono inputs, wires are connected to the cartridge...

You have to turn the volume control almost all the way to really hear the record.

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  • 38 Answers

Hello Charles.

Maybe you use the wrong pickup system.
Normal Phono inputs are just for MM-Systems.
MC-System needs other Pre-Amp.
Some newer Amps have a switch (mostly near the Phono inp.) to select MM- or MC- system. (MM means Moving Magnet-Sys. and MC is Moving Coil-Sys)

Best Regrets Gue.

Posted on Apr 22, 2017

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1 Answer

Why is the volume not loud?


Have you connected it to an amp with a dedicated "phono" or "record deck" socket? If your amplifier does not have one of these you will need to buy a Magnetic Cartridge Preamp and connect that between the deck and amp.

Jan 26, 2014 | JVC AL A158BK Turntable

1 Answer

Connected new polks to cambridge audio amp a1 (about 30 watts per channel) and play cds through a panasonic dvd/cd player, but i can't turn up volume past 1 without it sounding too loud. sound is ok, but...


Plug the player in somewhere else besides the PHONO input.

"PHONO" is the only designated connection on an audio device that is literal and exclusive. Nothing but PHONO will work right on it because old-school turntables require it to preamplify the tiny current produced by a Phono cartridge.

I imagine if you REALLY listened hard to the result you have you would find the bass is WAY too.

Google 'RIAA curve' to understand why.

http://www.graniteaudio.com/phono/page5.html

Mar 28, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

I have tried too hook up my Gemini XL-500, to a Sony Digital Audio DTS discrete 6ch Amp , but get very low volume, tuner & cd dvd, volume is fine, does this have anything to do with the ground?...


No! The amp must have a magnetic cartridge pre-amp to increase the sound level. If it has one it will say "phono" on the inputs on the back and have a "turntable" - or "Phono" selector switch. If it doesn't have one (many new surround amps don't) you won't be able to play it properly untill you get a "magnetic cartridge pre-amp". This will make the signal loud enough to be used on a normal aux imput of the Sony.

Jul 16, 2010 | Gemini XL-500 Turntable

1 Answer

Hi there! i just bought a numark tt1650 and an ortofon arkiv cartridge, connected it properly to my old technics a700mk2 amplifier (phono, grounding and all that) but it still has a buzzing problem...


Try connecting the turntable to one of the other inputs like CD / tuner etc and see if the buzzing disappears. if so then your turntable has a built-in pre-amp so it can be connected to any input except 'phono' as this would obviously be used for turntables without a pre-amp.
a lot of modern turntables now have built-in pre-amps to compensate for certain amps and receivers made without a phono input and can now be connected just like a CD player, tuner etc.

hope this helps.

May 05, 2010 | Numark TT1650 Turntable

1 Answer

Low volume through amplifier


Turntables generate a very low signal. Phono inputs on receivers containa pre-amp section to boost the signal to "line level" or the same level as other audio devices. I would suspect that you need to add that pre-amp section. Phono preamps are available for around $20 or so and are inserted between the turntable and the standard audio input on the receiver or amp.

Hope this helps,
Dan

Apr 15, 2010 | Cambridge Audio Azur 540A Amplifier

1 Answer

I just bought a pioneer pl-200 turntable at a flea market. I plugged it into an old am/fm/8-track amp's phono input and I know the amp cranks on fm but on phono, it's very low sound. It does get louder...


Turntable signal outputs are very, very low amplitude and either have to pass through a pre-amp before being connected to an amplifiers "ordinary" inputs (e.g. aux), or connect to an amplifier's specific turntable input in order to give the "normal" levels of volume.
This is because the cartridge (the bit that has the stylus or needle on it) can only generate very small amplitude signals.
As turntables are now outdated, a lot of amps no longer have a turntable input any more.
Unless you can also find a cheap pre-amp or an old amp with a turntable input, you may have wasted your money.

Sep 21, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

3 Answers

Distorted sounds


The AT-PL120 uses a magnetic cartridge to extract a music signal from the record. Magnetic cartridges all put out a very weak electric signal, and so their output must be strengthened, or amplified, to where it is as strong as the input from, say, a CD player. This amplification is provided by a pre-amp. If your receiver has dedicated "phono" inputs the pre-amp circuits are already in the receiver. If you do not have dedicated phono inputs you must either buy a pre-amp, or buy a magnetic cartridge turntable with a pre-amp built into itself. The AT-PL120 has a built in pre-amp. You can switch the AT-PL120's preamp on or off. The switch is located under the platter at the back side of the turntable. Take the platter mat off and turn one of the platter's holes to the back and you should see the switch through the hole. If you push the switch to LINE OUT the preamp is turned on and the turntable sends an amplified cartridge signal out the cables which MUST be connected to a receiver inout suitable for a CD player (a "high level" input). If you push the pre-amp selector switch to PHONO OUT the turntable sends the weak unstrengthened cartridge signal out the cables which MUST be connected to the receiver's dedicated PHONO inputs so the signal can be amplified with the receiver's own pre-amp circuits.

If everything is set wrong (i.e. LINE OUT (pre-amp on), and connected to phono inputs) you are applying two steps of strengthening to the turntable's signal which is too much. The resultant sound will be garbled. Try not to do this!

The other way to do everything wrong is set the pre-amp switch to PHONO OUT (pre-amp off) and connect the turntable's cables to a high level input. If this happens the turntable signal receives no amplification and the resultant sound will be thin and weak.

May 09, 2009 | Audio Technica AT-PL120 Turntable

1 Answer

WEAK SOUND WHEN CONNECTED TO DURABRAND AMP


The electrical output from a turntable actually comes from the cartridge on the tone arm. Specifically, it's generated by an interaction between a magnet and a coil inside the cartridge. They come in two types, MC ("moving coil") and MM ("moving magnet") according to which of the two elements moves and which is fixed. MM cartridges produce more current but MC cartridges usually sound better. No matter which you have though, the total output is too low for the regular line inputs on amplifiers. Ten or twenty years ago, amps has special "phono" inputs. This would have a special pre-amplifier in it that would amplify the cartridge's singal to a level suitable for the rest of the amp. Most amps having a phono input only deal with MM cartridges, which have a higher signal.

I use an MC cartridge with an amp that doesn't have a phono input at all; therefore I needed to buy a special external phono pre-amp. I bought a Musical Fidelity X-LPS. But cheaper pre-amps do exist.

Apr 13, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

Sound is way too low


Make sure you are connecting the unit to the PHONO input on your receiver or mixer. If you do not have a PHONO input, then you need to purchase a PHONO PRE-AMP and then you'll be able to connect to any LINE or AUX level input.

- DJ PRO LAB
www.djprolab.com

May 01, 2008 | Technics SL-1200MK2 Turntable

1 Answer

Very low audio output


Make sure your receiver has a PHONO input. If you are connecting it to a LINE or AUX input, then there is not enough signal to boost the sound coming from the turntable. Turntables require a PHONO input, because phono input's have a pre-amp on them, which boost the turntable signal. If you do not have a PHONO input on your receiver, you will need to buy a Phono Pre-Amp.

If you have a phono input, then you might have an issue with the turntable's RCA cables, or your cartridge may be at fault.

- TWEAK AV LAV

Nov 22, 2007 | Audio Technica AT-PL120 Turntable

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