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What are the operaing pressures for 410a and 404a ptac. on a 70 80 90 degree day

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: I AM HAVING PROBLEMS WITH 410A HEAT PUMP A/C

Clean the condenser coil, they have to be able to reject the heat. Clean it.

Posted on Jul 06, 2011

Testimonial: "Thanks we will try that."

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What is a 410A 3 1/2 ton air-conditioner low pressure at 80 degrees


??? 80 degrees ??? Anything below 100 psi is going to start freezing up. 410a refrigerant is approximately 32 degrees at 100psi. Typically a 410a low pressure switch will open at 50 psi.

May 08, 2017 | Heating & Cooling

Tip

R-410A The New Refrigerant for Air Conditioning


R-410A possesses excellent cooling capacity and operates at 50% higher pressure. R-410A is a mixture (blend) of refrigerants that create properties nearly identical to R-22, but are free of ozone depleting chlorine molecules. R-410A was developed in response to an agreement between numerous countries (known as the Montreal Protocol). That stated that those countries would move toward discontinuing the use of hydrochloro-fluorocarbon (HCFC)-based refrigerants. R-410A, chemically known as an HFC (hydrofluorocarbon), contains no chlorine and will not damage the ozone layer.

R-410A is an azeotrope mixture of R-32 and R-125. R-410A cannot be used to retrofit existing R-22 a/c equipment due to significantly higher operating pressures and much higher cooling capacity as outlined in the chart below. R-410A when operating at normal operating pressures and temperatures has higher pressures. R-410A cannot be used as a "drop-in" replacement for R-22; the higher operating pressures will damage R-22 compressors and components. Therefore the old R-22 refrigerant systems needed to be buffed up some to handle the higher pressures. Because of this R-410A and R-22 equipment cannot be cross matched.

R-410A has unique performance specifications and characteristics for oil, moisture indication, thermal expansion valves, compressors, filter driers and refrigerant handling. R-410A air conditioners use newer synthetic lubricants that are usually more soluble with the R-410A than the old mineral oils are with the older R-22 refrigerants. R-410A systems use mineral oils for lubrication. R-410A systems can be more reliable than R-22 systems. R-410A air conditioners and heat pumps are today's "state of the art" systems, and utilize the most current technology available for efficient and reliable operation.

R-410A was developed to replace the ozone depleting R-22 refrigerant now used in most residential and some commercial air conditioning equipment. R-410A has no ozone depletion potential but does have a higher global warming potential.

R-410A has quickly become the refrigerant of choice for use in air conditioning applications because the refrigerant delivers higher efficiency and better Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) than other choices. Make sure that if you are installing a new air conditioning system, that you specify that the new system uses R-410A. Not only is a R-410A system more reliable, but remember that R-22 use will be discontinued in 2010. An R-410A system will give you the best and most effective service for the foreseeable future.

on Dec 14, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

How much r410 gas pressure in 1.5 ton inverter ac


Usually on any 410a freon system you can use a pt chart, and for any other freons also. At 120psig yours indoor coil temp is around 40°f. You want this temp/pressure above freezing. Your pressures are going to depend on indoor/outdoor temps. Hope this helps!

Mar 23, 2017 | Inverter Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Delfield 6000 series 404a, need running pressure in 94 degree kitchen


300-350 on high side. Way too high. Most all commercial unit are built to live in an environment of not more than about 80. Some survive 85. Above that, it's will die due to over working and heating.

Jul 14, 2016 | Delfield Freezers

1 Answer

What is the suction pressure low side and high side charging 404a refigerant cooling temperature


evap temps usuall run 10-15 degrees below the box temp.This a generally accepted rule of thumb.

Sep 15, 2014 | Delfield Freezers

2 Answers

What happens if you would add a charge to a running system that has a low charge on a 404a system and you charge thru the suction as a vapor. I had a memory lapse and have charged 410 systems as a liquid...


as long as you recovered the charge, pulled a vacuum, changed the filter/dryer, and added the correct amount of refrigerant as a liquid, you should be good to go.

Jun 28, 2017 | Hoshizaki Freezer Commercial Ice Machines...

1 Answer

I have a walk in freezer with 404a, I am reading about 25 on the low side,the outside temp is about 110 degrees,its not low on freon,and everything seems to be working fine, except I cant get the temp down...


What is the high side pressure?
Are the indoor and outdoor coils clean?
Indoor and outdoor fan motors working OK?
Ice on the coils or expansion valve?
Is the unit sized correctly for the space?

Aug 08, 2011 | Refrigerators

1 Answer

What should be my pressure on a 404a freezer


usually depends on the temp of the conditioned space. Most freezers run about a minus 10 evap to get a 0 degree box. So look for a low side pressure of about 25. High side is ambient plus 30. A 75 degree ambient, for example, add 30 and get 105 degrees. That, on a P/T chart converts to about 253 psi. Those are approximate but I'm sure you can use this to fugure out what to look for.
let me know if you need more help.

Sep 27, 2010 | Continental Manufacturing Company...

1 Answer

Evaporator unit keeps on building ice. question what is the nornal operating pressure on low side and on the high side for truee freezer using 404 refrigerant


I'll try to give you the "Readers Digest" version.
First, make sure there is no ice build up on the evap. Light frost is O.K. as long as it does not effect air flow. (Very Important). All fans need to be running. Again, an air flow thing. There should be some product in the box but not too close to the evap. Again, an air flow thing.
The expansion device can effect your pressures to some degree i.e. Cap tube vs. TXV.
As a general rule of thumb, which I use almost everyday when it comes to pressures:
Low side is based on the temp difference between evap temp and condition space in the box. In freezers, it is almost always 10 degrees. If the box is 0 degrees then the evap needs to be at a minus 10 degrees. That is a pressure for R-404A of 24.5 psi. This only holds true when the temp in the box is approching set temp. I would say, about +10 degrees. 0 Degrees for the evap for R-404A is 33.5 psi.
High side should be ambient temp +30 degrees and then convert to a pressure for the refrigerant.
Example: 75 degrees in the room, +30 degrees equals 105 degrees. Now 105 degrees converted to a R-404A pressure is 253 psi. This will get you very close to the desired high side pressure.
I would look at low side first to see if it is within reason. Don't let the high side get too high. Increases the compression ratio and overworks the compressor.
Your icing problem could be a defrost issue and not a refrigerant charge issue.

Good Luck and hope this gets you started.

Apr 07, 2009 | True 49 cu. ft. / 1388 liter Commercial...

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