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I need PA speaker recommendations for a 100 watt powered mixer rated 4 ohm minimum.

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100 watt output isn't a huge amount for a public address system by today's standards but where PA is concerned there are a number of variables to be taken into consideration and these are best considered by experts in that field who will then suggest a variety of options.

They will want to know whether it is to be used indoors/outdoors, whether it needs to be weatherproof, whether it is to be portable or fixed, the size of the venue, whether it is a 100 volt line and the size of your budget and probably a few other things in addition...

Posted on Apr 18, 2017

  • Steve Shelton
    Steve Shelton Apr 18, 2017

    Indoor, small venue (coffee shop, etc.) for a vocal duo with multiple acoustic instruments.

  • Vernon Taylor Apr 18, 2017

    Almost a cabaret then and given the size of the venue amplification would hardly be needed. The last thing that should happen during such a gig is for the music and singing to be so loud folk can't converse with waitresses. Louder is definitely not better...

    I suggest you consult an acoustic engineer for recommendations regarding the placing and type of speakers so the sound can be zoned so those who want to receive the full effect of performance are able to while others can enjoy the ambient sound while ordering coffee and food.

    Traditionally such venues were musically serviced by such as a pianist or a string section completely unamplified and without percussion and that was found to be more than adequate. In due course these were supplemented by special lunchtimes or evenings with jazz, folk or pop performances which, while bringing in enthusiasts for the sound tended to drive the regulars away because it was TOO LOUD!

    Dee-jays and musicians are very misguided about what is good and have little consideration for the audience. No musician has ever been in the audience with a decibel meter while he has been on stage and no musician has ever tried to order a round of drinks while he has been playing.

    Sheffield university in the UK has done much research about how to deliver the sound to an audience without causing any of them discomfort or hearing damage. Their solution is many small ceiling mounted speakers producing relatively low volume so every audience member regardless of where in the room they are, receives the same sound, the same volume and most of all the same quality of sound.

    Food for thought...

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1 Answer

I need 4 ohm speakers for my Warrior IS600 Amplifier


It is rated as a dual 300 watt amplifier, shich strongly suggests a Class D peak value for each amplifier.

In theory- 100 watt RMS 4 ohm speakers should be adequate.

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What is the actual watts per channel @ 8-ohms and 4-ohms on the Behringer PMP3000?


Those specs would be right - I have this same board but the amp was fried by a previous owner. I pulled the amp board out and tossed it and use the mixer now to drive an external amp. Great board. This amp is rated at 1200W "peak", bridged into an 8ohm load. That would equate to about 900W RMS bridged into 8ohm or 450 per side into 4ohm loads per side. You can't daisy chain all 4 speakers....impedance would be too low. You can run two of your 8ohm speakers per side - that results in a 4ohm load per side for the amp. That would give you amp delivery of 450W per side. Your speakers are rated to handle more than that so you're fine. For the record.....you could run one speaker per side no problem....just lower power output.

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1 Answer

Useing a Peavey XR 800F Powered PA Mixer/Amp which develops distortion on output after around 60 minutes. Also had gear linked to all inputs at the time, three mics, 2 guitars and keyboard. Any ideas...


First of all confirm if the speaker impedance is not lower then the recommended Ohms at the back of the Mixer speaker socket.You can use an 8 Ohms speaker on a 4 Ohms amplifier but not vise versa .
Next see if the fan on the mixer works. If not the Amp is getting very hot and this will lead to unwanted distortion. You can confirm if its a heat related issue by playing the mixer at low volumes for more than an hour and see if it distorts.

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Could you send me the best set up starting with 1 for setting up our new XR 8600 Powered mixer in our church. We have 3 bose loudspeakers on each speaker output. Should those Bose be set for 100 watts...


Sorry, but you have a problem. The amp is rated to 4 ohms per side. Your speakers would have to be 16 ohm type to allow 3 per side in parallel. The Bose ratings are usually consumer type ratings and they would have to be set to 200 watts each (twice the rating that the amp can produce per side) to be safe connected to that amp. Your speakers are likely 8 ohm so you could parallel ONLY two per side OR if they are 4 ohm, then you would have to series them. You could series two or three per side safely for the amp. You don't tell us what model Bose speakers you have. Anyway, one has to first meet the specs of the amp and the speakers to avoid damage. It is likely the amp is too BIG for the speakers. For the setup of the mixer portion of this problem I want you to view videos on YouTube. Search for "mixer setup". Don't worry that they are different mixers than yours... there is enough commonality and the functions are nearly the same for MOST analog mixers. Recommendation: forget about two of the speakers... keep them as spares and run low volume to avoid blowing the speakers. I can't imagine any competent audio equipment supplier configuring your system this way.

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I am trying to find the output power, watts?


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1 Answer

Wattage


I have the following specs for you
Basically 150watts per channel using two channels , or 75watts using all four
Here goes:

  • 4 Channel Mosfet Amplifier
  • Advanced Overload and Thermal Protection
  • Metal Film Capacitors/Resistors In Signal Path
  • Frequency Response +/-1dB, 20Hz to 20 kHZ
  • Signal to Noise Ratio (A-weighted) >100dB
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  • Max Continuous Power per Channel @ 1% THD 75 watts x 4 into 2 ohms @ 14.4 Vdc
  • Nominal Continuous Power per Channel @ 1 % THD 35 Watts x 4 into 4 ohms @ 14.4 Vdc
  • IASCA/USAC Power Rating 12 Watts x 4 into 4 ohms @ 12.5 Vdc
  • Minimum Load when Bridged 2 Ohms
  • Minimum Load per Channel 1 Ohm
  • Input Signal Voltage Range 0.1 volts to 2 volts
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  • Crossover Slope 24 dB per octave
  • Crossover Frequency Range 20-550Hz
  • Factory Crossover Setting 85 Hz
  • Auxilary Output Channels 2
  • Auxilary Output Frequency Range Highpass or Lowpass, Opposite of Speaker Output
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  • Power Supply Voltage 10Vdc to 15.5Vdc
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1 Answer

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A+B speakers = 4 channels 2 right 2 left

100 watts/4 = 25 watts per channel

RMS watts / channel = 25 x .707 = 18 watts/channel which is your average consumer stereo system

I would use 8 or 16 ohm speakers (not 4 ohm) -- almost any set of stereo speakers will "work" -- these will be 8 ohm and about 5 watt minimum / 40 watt max thereabouts

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Do you have instructions for wiring install on volfenhag GX8200??


Amplifier Class AB
Number of Channels 2
RMS Power (4 ohms) 120 watts x 2 channels
RMS Power (2 ohms) 200 watts x 2 channels
RMS Power (1 ohm) Not Stable
Bridged RMS Power 400 watts x 1 channel
Total RMS Power Output 400 watts
Peak Power Output 1000 watts watts x 1 channel
Minimum Impedance Unbridged 2 ohms
Minimum Impedance Bridged 4 ohms
THD at Rated RMS Power 0.1%
Speaker Level Inputs No
Preamp Outputs 1 pair
Built-in Crossover High-pass (HP), Low-pass (LP), Full (AP)
High-Pass Crossover Frequency 40 - 250 Hz
Low-Pass Crossover Frequency 40 - 250 Hz
Subsonic Filter N/A
Signal-to-Noise Ratio N/A
Channel Separation N/A
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Bass/Gain Remote Yes
Fan Cooled Yes
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1 Answer

Gem Sound clipping problem


First of all the EXA-3940 is rated at 350watts per channel in to 8 ohms. The 1400 watts is bridged into a 4 ohm load. Second, the speakers can handle 1000Wats peak with an average of 600 continuous (i'm guessing). That tells me that the amp is underpowered for the speakers. The sensitivity of the amp is such that the mixer is overdriving the input stage. That is what is causing the clipping. If you are looking for more volume, you are probably better off purchasing another amp and running them in bridge mode, 1 per speaker cab. Be careful though, not to overdrive the speaker cabinets either.

Dan

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1 Answer

Sub+amp configuration


With a single 4-ohm subwoofer, usually the best choice is a 2-channel amp that can be bridged to a single channel. In your case, the sub is rated for 1000 watts. Not many amps are rated for that kind of continuous power into a 4-ohm load. Kicker doesn't list a minimum power rating, which isn't unusual in subwoofer specs. Depending on your budget, I'd look for an amp rated for 300-500 watts minimum; the higher, the better, up to 1000 watts. Most amps will have several power ratings, based on the load impedance and number of channels driven. A typical 2-channel amp might be rated like this: 150 watts x 2 channels at 4 ohms 300 watts x 2 channels at 2 ohms 500 watts x 1 channel at 4 ohms. The power rating you'll want to look at will be the 1-channel, 4-ohm rating. You can look at mono amps, too, but in the power ranges you're looking for, a 2-channel amp will probably give you the best value. However, if you can find a mono amp with a high enough 4-ohm power rating, it would run cooler and might last longer than a 2-channel amp with comparable power. When looking at mono amps, you'll find their highest power output will be at 2 ohms or 1 ohm; make sure you're checking the 4-ohm rating when making comparisons. Some amplifiers that might work well for you: Kicker SX900.2 Kicker ZX850.2 Alpine PDX-1.1000 Rockford T600-2 Hifonics ZXi 1006 Premier PRS-D2100T Power Acoustik OV2-2200

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