Question about Kensington K64325 Trackball

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Scroll ring intermittent / non functioal

I've own 2 Kensington K64325 Trackball's. They both lost scroll wheel functionality just after the warranty period. (go figure!) The first one never scrolls, the second one intermittently, possibly on the way out? I've googled for anyone else that may have this problem with no hits. Anyways, I work in an electronics environment, and the circuit board, IR sensors are clean and unobstructed. It just seems strange that I am the only person to get 2 bad trackballs with the same problem.. oh yeah, I also tried both USB and PS2 connections.

Specs: XP / 2G ram / 2 Tb disk space / E6850 CPU....
same problem follows when connected to other computers.

Any assistance would be appreciated Thanks ahead.

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  • Rithas Dec 16, 2007

    Im having a similar issue but instead of no functionality I get altered function.  From time to time it will 'switch' to horizontal scrolling instead of vertical scrolling.  I have tried support through Kensington but so far they have done the standard clean and reinstall bit.  There is no switch in mouseworks that changes the default scroll direction.  I really dont want to have to reinstall drivers everytime this happens.

  • Anonymous Jun 29, 2008

    Same problem. Had the device for a couple of months. Opened it up & things look OK. Sounds like they have a design or QA problem.

  • pchang Oct 08, 2008

    Same problem. Sometimes the ring works, sometimes it makes no effect, and occasionally the window scrolls up when the mouse scrolls down. Mysterious.

  • mmcginity Mar 25, 2009

    I think there are possibly two different problems one can have with scrolling:

    The first is the enabling/disabling of "Allow Horizontal Scroll". This switches between vertical and horizontal scrolling with the scroll ring.
    The best thing is to map some key-combination (me, I use buttons 4+ 5) to toggle this option.

    However, I have a second problem with one of my trackballs (I have two)...
    the scroll ring itself seems to be producing noisy data. When I scroll vertically, the whole scrolling motion is extremely jerky and noisy, sometimes jumping up and down large amounts rapidly. I know this is not normal behaviour because my other trackball behaves perfectly.
    My intuition is that this really is a hardware fault.



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I have a similar symptom, that is, apparent loss of scroll ring functionality as homercles1 noted, but in fact the scroll ring functionality gets toggled between horizontal scrolling and vertical scrolling as Rithas has noted. A window that is not wide enough to require horizontal scrolling will give the appearance of loss of scroll ring functionality when the scroll ring is in horizontal scroll mode. Likewise, a window that is not tall enough to require vertical scrolling will give the appearance of loss of scroll ring functionality when the scroll ring is in vertical scroll mode.
Solution that worked for me:
My upper right-hand button is defined as "Allow Horizontal Scroll" and by clicking this button, the scroll ring function toggles between horizontal and vertical scrolling. In fact, what can appear to be a nonfunctional scroll ring in some windows is very useful when moving around in large windows.
Hope this comment will be useful to you.

Posted on Jan 21, 2008


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1 Answer

Kensington mac os x driver doesn't work

Try Step A

Unplugging it and re plugging it back in

Or if you have another mouse do step A then move the curser with the mouse and now the trackball will work

Frustrating Isn't it !

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