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I have a 3000 watt generator, will this run the 15000btu air conditioner

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It should, but what have you got for plug ins on generator? 30 amp, or 15? I believe the rough estimate is 100 watts , equals roughly 1 amp.

Posted on Jul 22, 2009

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1 Answer

We have a portable honda cycloneverter 3000 is this big enough to run our air conditioner


Your generator has a label specifying the Watts, and so does your AC unit, just compare, if the W in the AC is higher than the generator W, do not try it.

Jun 23, 2015 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I want to install an air conditioning unit on the roof of a 1995 ford econoline van. How do you do it?


The air conditioners on RVs are 110 volt AC. They do not run on 12 volts and should not be run on inverters. You would need at least a 2000 watt generator, preferably 3000.
If you have the power, it requires cutting a 14 inch square hole in the roof. The air conditioner is clamped down by 4 bolts from the inside, part of the internal control package. You would need what is called a "non-ducted" inside unit which would have the thermostat and control knobs.

Mar 14, 2015 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

If I have a danbury portable air conditioner that uses around 7 amps to run, how big of a generator do I need to run it, ( ex. 2000 watt, 3000 watt, etc.) Thank you!


5,500 watts should do it because you need to consider the starting watts of your air conditioner and not the running watts, but if you want to run some other things you might as well buy an 7,000 watt genarator because the price isn't that much more depending on the brand.

I have a Briggs and Stratton 8,500 starting watts. I live in SouthEast Florida and I use it whenever we have a hurricane. I have it hooked to a transfer switch and it works everything except for my electric range and my three ton air conditioner. It will also work my hot water heater, lights, fans etc. I have only used it one time and it works great.

I plan to buy a whole house generator with the capicity of 25,000 watts so if you know anyone that could use it (even in it's original box stored in my garage, no rust or ware and starts on the first or secong pull) and they are in or near Boynton Beach, Florida then perhaps we could make a deal.

wa2yyx@juno.com

Good luck,

Marty

Jul 17, 2014 | Electrical Supplies

1 Answer

If I have a portable air conditioner that uses around 7 amps to run, how big of a generator do I need to run it, ( ex. 2000 watt, 3000 watt, etc.) Thank you!


If you live in the USA or another country that uses 120V municipal power, then the AC uses about 800W and you SHOULD be able to run it (including starting the AC, which takes a lot more power than keeping it running once it's started) with about a 1500W to 2000W generator.

Jul 17, 2014 | Electrical Supplies

1 Answer

How do you stop generator from stalling under load


As you have not provided me with the information I requested I'm going to have to take a few guesses here Bob. You could be overloading the generator. You can't run a 10,000 BTU air conditioner off of a 1000 watt generator. You need to look at your load, (what you are trying to power), and determine how much power it needs. Almost everything has a tag somewhere on the device. Most don't give watt requirements. But they do tell you, how many amps the device pulls, as well as the voltage the device needs. So you need to do some math here. Volts X Amps = Watts. So if we have a 120 volt device, that pulls 15 amps, we need 1800 watts to power it. But it gets a little more tricky than that. Motors are often rated at what they pull while they are running! But it can take two or three times more power to get them started. Example... A motor rated at 10 amps, using 120 volts will be 120 X 10 = 1200 watts. But it could take 2400-3600 watts to get it running. So in theory a 3000 watt generator may die before it can start that load. Heating elements are also power hungry! Let's say you have a small 800 watt generator, and your just trying to run a simple coffee pot! Well the heating element in a typical coffee pot pulls 1000-1500 watts. A hair dryer or microwave oven rated at 1000 watts, is the power they produce, not the power they consume! So a 1000 watt microwave may pull 1600 watts of power to run. Most non US generators are highly over rated as well. I certainly would not trust a Harbor Freight 3000 watt generator to actually put out 3000 watts of power. Not that they are bad units, I would expect their numbers to be under PERFECT conditions. Temperature, humidity and altitude also play a part! Your 3000 watt generator is going to put out more power at 50 degrees, at sea level, than it is at 7000 ft in the mountains at 100 degrees. So my "guess" Bob, is that your just asking more from the generator than it can produce. Picking out a generator is not as easy as it looks. "Hey that one is $1000 and this one is $300! They both make power! What's the difference". The difference is what do you need to run! "Heck I'll just get that 50,000 watt unit"! Yeah you can do that too, but you will never use that much power, and you will burn way more fuel than you need to. My other "guess" is that you have a governor issue on the engine. As load increases the gov will throw more throttle to the motor. My generator has an option to run full speed or on the gov. So it will idle and burn less fuel while I am hammering in a nail, then go to full power when I trigger a saw connected to it. Lot's of factors involved here Bob.

May 30, 2014 | Generac Electrical Supplies

1 Answer

I'm purchasing a generator to power the Dometic Duo Therm Brisk Air A/C unit in my camper. How many watts does it draw?


You will need at least a 5000 watt generator to run that and a few lights etc... for the camper.

heatman101

Aug 18, 2010 | Dometic Rooftop RV Air Conditioner

1 Answer

My rv air conditioner won't run on a 5000 watt generator, it pops the breaker on the generator. It is a 15,000 on a 1992 prower regal travel trailer


Most likely the air conditioner draws more power than the generator can supply. Check the current needed for the air conditioner in amps. It should be on a plate attached to the it. If the generator is a 5000 watt it can supply 5000 divided by the voltage required by the airconditioner. i.e. 240 (=20.8 amps) if you live in the UK or Ireland or 120 (41.6 amps) in most of the rest of the world. If it's a 12 Volt Airconditioner than you divide 5000 by 12 Note this is the absolute maximum that can be drawn and as power generally fluctuates will still probably cause the circuit breaker to trip. You should ideally be drawing no more than three quarters of the current available. If there are other appliances being run off the generator this again reduces the amount of current available.

Jul 21, 2010 | Dometic Rooftop RV Air Conditioner

1 Answer

I have a coleman model 8333A8664 a/c unit on a fleetwood camp trailer and was wondering what watt generator would be needed to run it properly?


Because it won't be powering just your AC, I would recommend 5000W. It's that big amp draw when compressor kicks in that will pull it way down, if not strong enough. Take for example the fact that a dedicated 20 amp breaker and cable are the norm for RV's to use for AC now. Double check also that the generator your purchasing will take a momentary surge draw of up to 20+ amps without tripping breaker on generator. I say 20+ because once RV is plugged in or wired to generator, it will be powering any other hydro operated appliances, lights, converter etc that the trailer has on board. I bought a cheapie rated at 4000W, and 3000 running watts, but it kicks out the breaker just trying to start my portable air compressor, rated at 15 amps.

Jun 10, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I have a 247 03 Springdale RV trailer. I want a


Depends on wattage demand of ac unit. VXA=W 110x20amps=2,0200 Watts. A 2,00 watt generator is too small. Best go for a 3,kw genset. A 5 kw will leave you room to run appliances and the ac simultaneously., otherwise you will need to watch your margin usage. I think 4.5 kw gensets are also available. Happy trails.

Jul 25, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

Coleman 7300 rooftop air conditionor wont operate


When they sit allot - sometimes the fan will stick.. Take the cover off,, turn it on and see if the fan is stuck.. Spin it by hand to free it up..

Jul 09, 2009 | Dometic Rooftop RV Air Conditioner

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