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Can a billionair own a small local airport and become a owner of a charter airline, chief pilot and airport police chief all by himself?

Can he hold all these positions all by himself if he has lots of money and get qualified? -CEO of the airline -CEO of the airpoort -chief pilot of the airline -police chief of the airport police

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He would be stretching himself too thin to do it all at once. Airport police chief would require all his time spent on the ground, so being a pilot is possible, it would be impractical.

Posted on Jan 07, 2017

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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What happens if a private Cessna 172 pilot tries to land at big airports like JFK or O'Hair when there is no emergency?


It's quite permissible to do so, however a general aviation pilot in a low performance plane should be ready for fast instructions and quite a bit of maneuvering to stay out of the way. The best time to do it would be at night. Here's a youtube video of one doing it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KKvWn317tpU

Jan 04, 2017 | Aircrafts

1 Answer

Is being a job quitter common in the pilots' world?


The answer is a bit complex. To a degree, what you hear is correct - but it does not quite mean what you might otherwise think it means.

Consider your first job (maybe while in high school), working the drive-thru at McDonalds. It's a honest job, but most folks (especially youngsters) don't intend to do it for the rest of their lives. The expectations are that you will change jobs a number of times (hopefully for better jobs with better pay) before you are finally established in a career. Pilots are in a similar situation.

For many pilot jobs, especially with getting to the airlines, it is all about the hours. Those hours represent both experience (and some hours are better than other - twin engine hours are better than single, and jet is better than piston). But paying for the hours yourself is beyond the reach of most people. So pilots who want a career with the airlines usually have to start at the bottom. They scrape up enough money to get their commercial license and instructor rating, and start instructing - often in a rental plane older than they are, and for so little money that they too are working the drive-thru at McDonalds.

They accumulate enough hours (and contacts) to start helping out with late night freight delivery (called being a freight dog). Maybe get some charter work. Than a full time charter job. Move up from there to a small regional carrier or one of the charter jet companies. Then finally, if they are lucky, to the majors. And yes, this means changing jobs several times.

Now understand, some pilots love instructing and may do that for their entire time. But for most, instructing and hauling freight and the rest are just stepping stones to their "dream job."

Once with a major carrier they typically stay with that carrier if at all possible. Within the carrier, the pay and job quality and other perks are determined to a large degree by seniority. Switch to another carrier and you may lose all that hard earned seniority. [Pilots generally hate mergers and acquisitions, since that may affect their seniority, without them having any choice in the matter.]

So yes, a freshly licensed commercial pilot may indeed change jobs a number of times on the way up - but probably no worse than a lot of other career paths.

Jan 04, 2017 | Aircrafts

1 Answer

Is it common that small local airports don't have radars?


It is very common for small airports not to have a control tower, radar, or communications equipment. There are very well developed procedures for "uncontrolled airports". There is a standard traffic pattern that aircraft fly at almost all airports (consisting of a downwind, base, final, and upwind leg) and there are specific radio calls that are supposed to be made at certain points in the pattern. Most airports have a fixed base operator to supply fuel and services. They often monitor the common traffic frequency and supply some info to pilots about wind direction and runway in use. There's also a specific way to enter the pattern - usually at a 45 degree of the downwind leg, Yes it's possible for aircraft to collide and it happens several times a year - usually when a low wing airplane is above a high wing airplane in the pattern. Neither can see the other so occasionally that can happen.

Jan 04, 2017 | Aircrafts

2 Answers

Pilot Career Help?


Usually, once you have a private pilot certificate you would go for an instructor rating and work as a flight instructor to build flight time (while making money). Along the way you could also be working on your commercial, multi engine, and air transport pilot ratings and certificates. It takes time to get into the airlines, mostly because you need to build flight time and experience. Even when you first break into the airlines the pay is kind of pathetic, but it builds quickly over time.

Jan 04, 2017 | Aircrafts

3 Answers

Do domestic flights fly over foreign airspace?


Technically is you are flying domestic you are not flying over foreign airspace. If flying IFR you must file one. Needless to say when filing a flight plan you must decalre if you are domestic of international flight.

Jan 04, 2017 | Aircrafts

1 Answer

Is there a law that says ex-felons can't work as commercial pilots?


Its a business deal. You could contract for a fixed minimum period of time.

Jan 04, 2017 | Aircrafts

3 Answers

Am I too late to become an airline pilot?


Many colleges offer flight training. Two that come to mind are UND and University of Cincinnati but there are many others. You might look into that as most airlines want a degree also. Regional airlines pay is garbage but you get raises pretty quickly as your time builds.

Jan 04, 2017 | Aircrafts

2 Answers

How can i get my pilots license?


Go to your local airport and talk with an instructor. That doesn't cost anything and they'll be happy to answer any of your questions. You can go for a sport pilot license first because it's the quickest cheapest way to get in the air. Then if you "catch the flying bug" you can progress to a private pilot certificate.

Jan 04, 2017 | Aircrafts

2 Answers

Question regarding aviation.?


Embry Riddle is one of the most expensive colleges you can attend for flight. There are many others such as University of Cincinnati and University of North Dakota that offer college programs in flight and aviation. Airlines do want college degrees so it's really a pretty good idea. I'd check out tuitions at other colleges that offer aviation.

Jan 04, 2017 | Aircrafts

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