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The difference between needle jets J89DGN05-57 J89DGN06-57 ?

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1993 waverunner bogging down on take off. New rebuilt carb, will low oil level cause this? Is there a low level switch /?


Only of you have ran the engine out of oil...Sounds like the carbs may not be set correctly.. .Did a professional do the rebuild?..What exactly was "rebuilt".. were any parts replaced?
Sounds like the low speed (pilot jets/air screw passages may not be clean as they need to be??)
Please check the compression on each cylinder..remove the spark plugs... hold the throttle (carbs) wide open when you check this.. spin the motor for 5-8 seconds... you should get 120psi. minimum..(and less than 10psi difference).. if less, it might be time to actually rebuild the top end..(new pistons/rings/hone cyl.).. only bore it if absolutely necessary.. get it measured..

There are only 3 parts in a two-cycle carb that ever need to be replaced,,(unless they are actually broken) The needle and seat assy., the jet needle and the needle jet. ..see pic... parts # 41 = needle and seat assy. #6 = jet needle, #37 = needle jet.

tm_flatslide_expl-bzhe2oey0b0e11an1gziaszn-4-0.gif

The needle and seat regulate the flow of gas into the carb as the floats rise and fall..,, if they are damaged or leaking the carb will overflow with gas., the needle jet is a orifice with a specific size..The jet needle has a specific size, taper, and length..== The jet needle and needle jet work in unison to regulate the flow of gas from right off idle all the way to WFO..the needle jet/jet needle WILL wear over time causing the fuel/air mixture to become richer and richer and start fouling spark plugs..(this is more pronounced on 4-cycle ATV's)...
I hope this has shed some light on your carb situation...
Good luck...
exploded view of mikuni carb Google Search

Jul 10, 2017 | Yamaha Waverunner Xl 800 / Xlt 1200 Jet...

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2000 650 vstar with hardkrome pipes and hypercharger. What would be the proper main jet and pilot jet sizes


Use a DYNAJET kit & go with the directions. Or check with the Hypercharger manufacture for correct jetting. But you will still need different needles & main jets for those pipes.

Jan 18, 2014 | 2001 Yamaha XVS 650 Dragstar Classic

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I have a 90 Kawasaki KLF300 Bayou 4X4 and I am having a problem with it running too rich no matter what I do. I have taken the carb apart several times, reset the mixture screw to factory setting. I have...


Hey Dave,
thought I answered this already,,,??? Classic "brass kit" symptom! >>> You need a "brass kit".. this is the needle jet and the jet needle in the center of the carb. The jet needle is the thin needle that hangs down from the center of the slide... The needle jet is the "hole" that the jet needle slides into...Remove the carb, take the bowl off, remove the main jet, the needle jet holder should be able to be gently tapped out, the needle jet is a short brasspiece,, it comes out through the hole where the slide goes,,, reinstall the NEW needle jet, needle jet holder...(it may have a groove in it for correct location). once its seated, you can reinstall the main jet..NOW >> to install a new jet needle,,, remove the slide from the carb.. remove the spring and seat from the slide that holds the needle jet in place.. NOTE which groove the clip is in on the old needle.... (should be the middle one). re install the new needle, reinstall everything else and your atv WILL run fine for a long time..This is a common problem on ATV's..
you need part #'s
1990 Kawasaki BAYOU 300 4X4 KLF300 C2 Carburetor

http://www.kawasakipartshouse.com/oemparts/p/kawasaki/16009-1503/needle-jet-n36w

http://www.kawasakipartshouse.com/oemparts/p/kawasaki/16017-1270/jet-needle-6

Jun 24, 2017 | kawasaki 2004 Bayou 300 4x4

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Bought bike had open pipes, old owner never had bike adjusted, added baffles for back pressure, runs 85% better, was wondering if it was possible to adjust carbs rather than rejetting?


In order for your motorcycle to run correctly you will have to put in larger main jets. Most jet kits also come with a set of needles that have a different taper from the stock needles. If you want the power band of your motorcycle to accelerate smoothly and get rid of the flat spot/hesitation when you apply throttle , you should spend the $100 and put in a jet kit.

Oct 15, 2010 | 2004 Honda VT 1100 C2 Shadow Sabre

1 Answer

Bike seems to be passing a lot of oil through exhaust. How much is normal?


The amount of unspent oil you see dripping from the end of your silencer is lovingly called spooge and it is a sign of a rich fuel condition. The common way to solve this by a jetting procedure. Your manual may be able to explain this, and the different jetting parts that are available, but be careful of errors in your manual. I've spotted at least 2 important ones in my 03 manual! Basically you need to replace/match jets for your particular conditions. Winter riding will be much different than summer for example. And Denver will be much different than somewhere at sea level. Find a jetting procedure for 2 strokes and test different pilot jets, needle jets, and main jets at your track until little to no spooge is seen. Be careful, of course, to also check your spark plug for a cappuccino colored tip to make sure you haven't jetted your carb too "lean". Finally, make sure to run 30:1 fuel mixture consistently through jetting (or 32:1, whatever your oil and bike manufacturer recommend).

Jun 20, 2010 | 2003 Suzuki RM 250

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How do I clean the carborator on my 1994 kawasaki ninja zx600-c


Carburator Theory and Tuning
carb_jet_usage1a.jpg

For some reason everyone seems to think tuning a carb is just real easy. Change a jet or two and boom, your there. Yeah, right ! There are quite literally millions and millions of jet combinations. A rough check on Bing carbs shows there are at least 13,860,000 different combinations of jets. If you are going to change carbs you'd better be prepared to spend some time and money on the job.
venturi1a.jpgmainjet_1a.jpgIf you look at a carburetor, you will notice a rather large hole going from one side to the other. This is called a Venturi. Air passes into the engine through this hole (Venturi). As the velocity of the air entering the carb (and then the engine) increases, it's pressure decreases, creating a low pressure or vacuum in the venturi. This vacuum moves around in the venturi, as the throttle is opened, and sucks gasoline through the different jets in the carb. The gas then mixes with the air going through the venturi. The way the jets are made causes the fuel to vaporize as it goes into the venturi. Where the jets are placed in the carb and where the jet's outlet is located in the venturi, determines what part of the throttle opening that jet controls. The idle jet system (comprised of pilot air jet, pilot fuel jet and pilot fuel screw) controls from 0% to about 25% of the throttle opening. The throttle valve controls 0% to 35% of the throttle opening. The needle jet and jet needle control from 15% to 80% of the throttle opening and the main jet controls 60% to 100%. This means that when you open the throttle about one eighth of the way open, all of the gas/air mixture going into your engine is controlled by the idle jet. As you can see, the different jets over lap the operating range of each other. That is, the jet needle starts to effect things before the effect of the idle jet ends. This is something to remember when working on carbs... everything is interconnected. Change one thing and it will effect other things.
OK, let's go over the different systems in the carb and see what they do.
  1. Fuel level. The fuel level is controlled by the fuel floats and the fuel float valve. The floats are hollow or made of something that will float on gasoline, such as cork. Part of the float presses against the float valve, sometimes called a needle and seat. Most times the part of the float that touches the float valve needle is bendable so you can adjust the level of the fuel in the floatbowel. All plastic floats are not adjustable. If this level is way too high, gas can leak out the carb overflow tube or into the engine. If fuel gets into the engine it will thin out the engine oil, ruining it's ability to lubricate. This will, sooner or later, blow up your engine ! If a full tank of gas in the evening turns into a half tank by morning, check your oil. If it's thin and smells like gas, change it and replace your float valve and/or check your fuel level. If the oil is OK, check under the overflow tube. If it's OK, then check where you are parking your bike 'cuse someone is walking away with your gas ! If your fuel level is just a bit high, the mixture will tend to be a bit rich. If it's low, the mixture will tend to be a bit lean. This is because a high level takes less vacuum to **** fuel into the engine and a low level takes more vacuum to do the same.


  2. Pilot or idle jet system. The idle jet controls the idle and on up to quarter throttle, give or take a bit. On some carbs, like Mikuni there is an air jet too. In conjunction with the idle jet there is an idle jet air screw. This screw leans or richens the fuel mixture for a smooth idle and on up to one quarter throttle. From the idle jet, there are little passages cast into the carb that lead to holes just in front of the throttle valve or plate. There can be just one hole or there can be several, depending on the carb design. They effect the mixture as long as the vacuum, in the venturi, is over them. As the throttle opens further, the vacuum moves to the needle jet and jet needle.
  3. The Throttle Valve. The big slide that opens and closes your throttle has a bevel angle cut in one side of the big round (can be flat, too) slide, toward the air cleaner. This angle comes in several sizes and helps control the fuel mixture from idle to about 35% open throttle.
  4. Needle Jet. This jet doesn't really even look like a jet, but it is ! It controls the fuel mixture from 15% to 60% open throttle. It sets in the center of the carb, right over the main jet.
  5. Jet Needle. This is the needle that rides in the throttle slide and goes into the needle jet. This needle controls the fuel mixture from 20% to 80% open throttle. It can come in many different sized tapers. Sometimes, one needle can have several tapers on it. The top end of the needle has grooves cut in it, usually five, and you can move the little clip on the end up or down to lean (down) or richen (up) the mixture. Most late model bikes have needles with only one groove cut in them. This is so you can't richen the mixture, thereby keeping the EPA happy.
  6. Main Jet. This jet controls the fuel mixture from 60% to 100% open throttle.

Apr 16, 2010 | 1994 kawasaki ZZR 600

1 Answer

So wat is the tipe and the sizes of the jets that


There are probably 15 different main jets, 15 different needle jets, and 15 different pilot jets available for your bike. Go to www.babbittsonline.com/parts/viewbybrand/parts.aspx Input info on your bike then go to "carburetors" in the drop down list. Please rate my answer.

Jan 08, 2010 | 2004 Suzuki RM 125

1 Answer

Hard starting;has stock jets.


Install a new stock spark plug after getting the compression checked and the valve clearances checked. Assuming good compression, use the choke when cold starting but don't flood the engine. Clean the air filter? If, when running, the bike dies when the throttle is turned, remove the jet needle from the throat of the carb and move the clip on the needle down one, possibly two, notches. This will richen the low end mix.

Jun 01, 2009 | 1995 Honda XR 250 R

1 Answer

Re-jet the bike


than it was the day before you can actually go back to your sea level jetting a 260 main jet! If you don't rejet you can kiss your assets goodbye when you rebuild the seized engine. Air temperature makes that much difference! Our final example will deal with something often overlooked. We are still up in the hills enjoying our NEW riding area when we notice the old fuel supply getting shorter. No biggie; there's a little store/gas station just down the road. A short trip a few bucks change hands and we are ready to go again. Out on the trail the bikes are running funny sometimes pinging and running HOT. What happened?!?! When we changed jets to compensate for altitude and temperature we were still using SEA LEVEL gasoline. Gasoline sold at higher elevations have a different blend of additives to compensate for the altitude. Generally high elevation gasoline is less dense to compensate for less available air going into the engine and to aid starting. The lighter specific gravity of the high elevation fuel actually leaned out our mixture! A 1 to 2 sizes bigger main jet will get us back into the hunt. If you ride in vastly different areas try to bring enough or your normal fuel along to last the entire ride. It will save you hassles and grey hair in the long run! PILOTS NEEDLES, MAINS: So far we have only talked about main jet changes to compensate for altitude, temperature and fuel density. As most of you know there is a pile of jets in a carb. While main jets are the most critical for ensuring full power operation and engine longevity, the other jets are equally as important for a good running engine. Let's run through them quickly. Pilot jets control the low-speed and idle mixtures. Many times an adjustable jet is used in conjunction with the pilot jet. The adjustable jet allows a precise setting of the idle mixture. If the adjustable jet is located to the rear of the carb and usually on one side it is a AIR adjustment. It controls the amount of air that mixes with the fuel coming from the pilot jet. If the adjustable jet is to the front of the carb, on the side or bottom, it controls the amount of air/fuel mixture going into the engine. In either case if adjusting the mixture screw won't improve the low-end running speed it's time for a different pilot jet. Throttle valves (the slide) control the off idle, to 1-quarter open ,mixture. Some aftermarket carbs have replacement slides available with different cutaways. Changing the cutaway changes the mixture. More cutaway is lean, less cutaway is rich. Some carbs do not have different slides available, so you have to compensate by changing the mixture on the idle circuit or needle circuit. Partial throttle hesitation or rough running can be caused by the slide cutaway. Needle jets control the amount of fuel going by the needle and into the engine at low to mid throttle. There are 2 types of needle jets used in a carb. One is a primary type that has a very precise hole hole drilled through the middle of it, along it's length. The size of the hole relative to the size of the needle determines how much fuel goes into the engine. The other type of needle jet is constructed essentially the same except for a bunch of holes drilled into the side of the jet. These holes allow air to mix with the fuel before it's metered into the engine. Either type of needle jet works well in most cases but there is power to be gained on HIGH PERFORMANCE 4-STROKES by going to the needle with the holes in the side. These are called bleed type needle jets and produce more midrange power in a 4stroke. In any engine going to a leaner (smaller) needle jet is the easiest way to rejet the midrange running when going to higher elevations. Changing the needle jet leans out the mixture evenly at all the midrange throttle settings moving the needle clip doesn't. Jet needles more commonly know as the needle control the fuel mixture throughout the midrange. The shape or taper of the needle dictates how much fuel goes into the engine at a given throttle opening. The needle must work in conjunction with the fuelling requirements of the engine relative to slide position. If you have an engine with a strong hit in the midrange the needle will probable have a noticeable reduction in size the the slide is half open. Remember it takes fuel to make power and when the engine makes power it needs fuel NOW! If it doesn't get the right amount of fuel it pings or misses. You many have cleared up a little midrange pinging by moving the needle up a notch but at the same time you may have overrichened some other areas. If the problem isn't too bad you won't even notice the rich condition. If the machine stutters before it comes on the power that part of the needle's taper is too small and the only way to cure it is to get a needle with a different taper. Finding the right needle can be difficult so hopefully moving the clip will do the job. Finally the good old mainjet comes into play at 3-quarters open to full throttle conditions. Most of you already know a bigger mainjet has a bigger hole so it lets more gas into the engine! Pretty simple!! As simple as it is the mainjet is absolutely CRITICAL to high-speed engine operation. Not only does it meter the gas into the engine, it can aid in cooling the engine as well. A properly sized mainjet will let the engine make good power for a long time. A one size smaller mainjet may make greater power for a while. A slightly rich mixture burns cooler than a lean one so be sure the mainjet is big enough! One final note on jets. All of them and the carburetion functions then perform tend to overlap into some other jet's territory. If you mess with one jet, you may have to mess with a few of the others. My best advice is to not change more than one jet at a time. Slowly work out the correct jetting and keep notes on what you are doing. If you get totally fouled up at least you can go back to where you started. SIGN, SYMPTOMS AND CAUSES: How would you know if there was something wrong with your jetting? If you listen, your engine will tell you! All you need is an interpreter. Since I speak and understand several different engine dialects, I will give you a hand. Let's start with lean conditions because they can cause the most damage. In a lean condition the engine will surge and sometimes ping under acceleration. The engine will also be cold-blooded (hard to start and keep running) but will run better when hot. The spark plug will look bone white or burned in extreme cases. The engine may spit back or sneeze thought the carb once in awhile too. If the engine is running rich the throttle response will be fuzzy and not too quick. The engine will burble, miss and blow black smoke. It will start easy but will run funny when fully warmed up. The plug will be dark, wet or fouled (possible all 3!). Ok so what do you do first to cure the problem? The very first thing is to check and adjust the float level. If it's off one way or another it can throw the jetting off too. Set the float to the specs and retest the running. The next item is to determine a rich or lean condition. Let's say the engine gets hot and doesn't pull well. This is a lean condition so the engine wants more fuel. Stick in at least a two size bigger main jet and try it again. If it's better but still not right go even bigger on the jet. and try it again. Bear in mind that drastic or sudden changes in jetting usually mean an air leak has developed somewhere in the engine. Find it and FIX IT!! When the engine burbles on the top end come down 1 jet size at a time until it winds all the way down. Don't drop and more sizes! If the engine seems sluggish and lumpy or want to load up on the bottom end the mixture is TOO RICH. Adjusting the low speed mixture screw helps a little but doesn't cure the problem completely. What you need now is a new pilot jet. Go 1 size smaller and try the adjustment again. When the engine runs smooth with the adjustment screw about 1 and a half turns out from the seat you have it!! IS THAT ALL THERE IS TO JETTING??: There's a lot more to jetting than just stuffing jets in holes and hoping the problem goes away. If you can understand what your engine is trying to tell you when it runs funny you will have a better chance or correcting the problem than someone who doesn't have a clue. When you rejet, go slowly and carefully until the problem is solved. As a final thought let me remind you that jetting is a lot like life, if you have a choice it's always better to be a little rich!!,,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2003 CCM 604 DS Dual Sport

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