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My scone recipe calls for 1tsp.cream of tartar and 1 tsp.baking soda. can i use a substitute for cream of tartar??

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: recipe call for all-purpose flour,

should be ok

Posted on Jun 26, 2008

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SOURCE: recipes for hb 68220 ice cream maker

Here is a link to the manual. You will find the recipes starting on page 8.

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Posted on Dec 27, 2008

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SOURCE: no maual/recipes for Waring Ice Cream Parlor CF520-1

Here you go.

Posted on Sep 10, 2009

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SOURCE: Donvier Ice Cream Maker instruction/recipe booklet needed

Hello! I bought one at the thrift store, and found the instruction booklet here- Have Fun!

Posted on Jan 18, 2010

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SOURCE: I need the user's manual (with recipe on how to make ice cream) for the back to basics 1.5 qt. ice cream maker

I also need users manual with recipes for 1.5 qt ice cream maker.

How to for ice cream, yogurt ice cream, and gelato.

Posted on Oct 22, 2012

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1 Answer

Can I used tartaric acid as sub for cream of tartare in meringue

Yes you can, it is the same thing, one is the chemical name and one in the common baking name.

The only different one is 'Baking Powder', which his a mix of two elements (bicarbonate of soda and tartaric acid) that create bubbles when wet.

Aug 18, 2017 | Coffee Makers & Espresso Machines


A Recipe for Great Chocolate Chip Cookies (adapted from Betty Crocker).

Here's a great recipe for a family favorite of ours - chocolate chip cookies:
3/4 cup sugar
1 cup margarine
3/4 brown sugar
1 egg
1 tsp vanilla
2 1/4 cups plain flour
1 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1 bag of chocolate chips (2 cups)
Preheat the oven to 375
Mix sugars, marg, egg and vanilla in large bowl. Stir in flour, baking soda, salt and choc chips
Drop dough in spoonfuls onto baking trays, leaving 2 inches between them.
Bake for 8-11 minutes until light brown.
Don't be tempted to overcook or they'll lose their chewy centre.

on Dec 17, 2013 | Cooking


Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe (with soy milk)

1/2 cup oil
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup soy milk
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 tsp salt
2 and 1/4 cups flour
1 tsp baking soda
12 oz semisweet chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
Mix the oil and sugar (you can use margarine if you prefer) until it becomes creamy and then add the eggs, the soy milk and the vanilla.
Combine the dry ingredients mixing them well and then add them slowly into the cream created before. Every few spoonfuls of dry ingredients, stir and then keep adding.
Blend well until it all looks smooth with no clumps and then add the chocolate chips.
Take a tray covered with wax paper and drop a spoonful of batter every inch or two, then let it bake for 8 to 10 minutes.
The cookies will be ready when they will be a sort of dark-ish gold. Pick up one with a tool to make sure it's cooked on the bottom too and take the tray out carefully.

on Sep 23, 2013 | Wine & Spirits

1 Answer

Can baking powder be substituted for cream of tartar? If so, will it cause cookies to raise? I want to make sugar cookies that are thin and crisp.

No, it is sometimes used in conjuction with baking powder but not interchangeable. Itvwill cause cookies to rise.

Dec 20, 2016 | Ice Cream Makers

1 Answer

How many teaspoons of baking powder equals one teaspoon of baking soda?

I'm by no means a baker, but the two are different. However, you can substitute, but you may not get what you are looking for and have to modify the recipe in other ways.

Generally, you will need 3 teaspoons of baking powder to equal a teaspoon of baking soda. But the baking soda is a base, and the baking powder is more neutral, so you may have to reduce the amount of acid in the recipe.

The following article explains it well.

The Difference Between Baking Soda and Baking Powder SimplyRecipes com

Good luck,


Dec 11, 2016 | Office Equipment & Supplies

1 Answer

I am out of cream of tartar what do I use in it place?

For beating egg whites - use an equal amount of white vinegar or lemon juice, or omit the cream of tartar entirely

As a leavening agent - replace the baking soda and the cream of tartar in the recipe with baking powder. One teaspoon of baking powder replaces 1/3 tsp of baking soda and 2/3 tsp cream of tartar

Feb 20, 2015 | Ice Cream Makers

1 Answer

Out of cream of tartar. What can I use from my cupboard to substitute?

see here
or any of a number of articles.

Possibly the function of cream of tartar in ice cream making is to stablise egg whites so the ice cream is similar in texture to whipped cream or meringue so you might try "use an equal amount of white vinegar or lemon juice, or omit the cream of tartar entirely". Have fun experimenting !


Dec 24, 2014 | Ice Cream Makers

2 Answers

How do you make buttermilk

Butter milk is 'usually' what remains when full milk (3%bf) or cream (10%bf) has been agitated to release its butter fat (bf). But if you are trying to 'substitute' a small amount in a recipe, say for muffins or coffee cake -- then adding a tsp. or so of lemon or vinegar to whole milk will do -- or diluting some real yogurt with water or milk, to the quantity the recipe requires.

Jun 29, 2014 | Cooking

2 Answers

To make self raising flour


Original recipe makes 1 cup
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder


  1. Stir or sift together the flour, salt, and baking powder. Presto, you've got self-rising flour!

Jun 13, 2014 | Cooking

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