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I have a T1000HD telescope . I was wondering what I need to do to be able to see planets such as Mars, Jupiter and Saturn's rings. Is it just a matter of getting different eyepieces? If so what kind?

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That scope came with a 25 mm and a 10 mm eyepiece, which will give about a x40 and a x100 magnification respectively. If the seeing is good (clear sky, not dusty or windy, and the planet not too low (at least 30 deg up from the horizon) you should get a reasonable view of the planets, with these ep's

If you do not have any ep's you could buy 2 or 3 plossl type ep's (nothing more expensive is justified) of say 10 mm, 25 mm, and 32 mm. It looks like it takes ep's with a 1.25" barrel.

The theoretical limiting power of your scope is about x 220, which is about a 4 mm eyepiece, but at that extreme you will find the viewing object is dim, fuzzy, hard to get into the field of view, hard to focus, and totally frustrating.

Sadly this scope is just not a very good one, sorry to sound elitist. One of the issues will be that of collimation (optical alignment). You can never properly focus the scope unless it is collimated. Reflector scopes (with a mirror) all have this difficulty. You can tell if it is collimated with a star test

http://garyseronik.com/no-tools-telescope-collimation/

There should be 3 screws on the bottom end of the scope, where the mirror is. These are the collimation screws. Have somebody screw these in and out while you look through the ep. Remember you can only assess the collimation when the defocussed star image is right in the middle of your view.
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Posted on Dec 12, 2016

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: what eyepiece do i need for a meade jupiter 60 az

Any of these will work, 1.25 inch measure the hole in the telescope.

http://www.agenaastro.com/Telescope-Eyepiece-1-25-inch-s/43.htm

Posted on Sep 25, 2009

GeoffW1
  • 3961 Answers

SOURCE: Can't see Jupiter/Saturn with RX-9 telescope

I would not feel too disappointed. The RX-9 is not a large or powerful telescope (sorry) and is therefore not capable of huge magnification without loss of clarity. The largest practical magnification for this scope in a dark-sky site would be about x225, which would be about a 4mm eyepiece. Such an eyepiece is in fact difficult to use unless it is a very expensive wide-angle type. They can cost $500 just for the one EP. The EPs you got with the scope will not be in that league, being cheap "Plossls".


If you are in the suburbs, you will also have a lot of light pollution, or sky-glow, and this makes it even more difficult to see a sharp image. The best image available may not be enough to see the bands, let alone the GRS. In the burbs you may only be able to use a max magnification of x90 , or about a 10mm EP.


Bear in mind that ultra-high magnification for visual observing is pure advertising nonsense, for all but large observatory scopes. Those lovely pictures you see are the result of long, heavily processed time exposures with a sensitive camera. You won\'t see that with the naked eye, especially in the burbs.


In addition to all that gloom, the GRS is not always facing us here on Earth. Here is when you can expect it to be visible


http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/objects/planets/3304091.html?page=1&c=y

Posted on Nov 28, 2012

r_yeoh
  • 4 Answers

SOURCE: i am wondering how good you should be able to see

700mm FL with an aperture of 60mm gives you a focal ratio of 11.6, so you shouldn't even try using any EP with a FL shorter than 11.6mm, which mean only the 12.5mm would be of any use. Unless you can find a pitch black area with 0 light pollution and excellent seeing, then you could perhaps still get away with the 8mm.

So with the 12.5mm, you're talking about a 56X magnification, so it would be rather hard seeing any details on the planets. You should be able to see Jupiter's moons (tiny dots) and Saturn's rings though.

Posted on Aug 17, 2016

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type in this link i think above i think you enjoy! later.

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What level magnification do I use to see jupiter or saturn in a telescope?


Your 3.5 inch telescope has a maximum magnification of about 170 power.

This is under perfect sky conditions and a perfectly collimated telescope. Galileo used 30 power magnification to see Saturn's rings and the moons of Jupiter!

Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser do not use the 2x barlow if you have one.

Point it at Saturn. You will see the rings. However they are almost slanted directly toward Earth right now. You will only see a thin line going across the planet.

By the end of 2010 they should open up again enough to make out the "ring" shape.

You only need about 50-70 power to view Jupiter or Saturn, or Venus. Mars is smaller and about 100 power to 120 power should permit you to see the disk of the planet (but it's still very small in the eyepiece).

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