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How do you adjust the focal length of a sannce camera

I cannot see number plates or faces at a distance away and I want to adjust the camera to do this.

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Unless your camera has the proper telephoto lens it will never get there .

Posted on Dec 07, 2016

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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I couldn't seem to blur my portrait backgrounds with the canon powershot a1200. can you help me with step by step instructions? does the a1200 have an AV mode at all? thanks


You're trying for what's called a narrow depth-of-field (DoF).

DoF is controlled by three factors: the aperture of the lens, distance to the subject, and the focal length of the lens. This has nothing to do with any particular design, it's simply physics.

The wider the aperture (smaller the f/number), the narrower the DoF. The A1200 does not have an Av mode which would let you control the aperture directly. However, it does have a Portrait mode, which is supposed to give you a wider aperture.

The closer you are to the subject, the narrower the DoF. This suggests that you get as close to the subject as practicable. However, in general you don't want to get too close for portraits as this tends to exaggerate certain facial features, like making noses look bigger.

The longer the focal length of the lens, the narrower the DoF. This suggests that you back away and zoom in. Yes, this conflicts with the previous paragraph.

Unfortunately, it's the actual focal length of the lens that matters here, not the "35mm equivalent" often quoted in the spces. The lens on the A1200 zooms from 5mm to 20mm. Landscape photographers like to use 24mm lenses on their 35mm cameras because that gives them practically infinite depth-of-field, from the flower in the foreground to the mountains in the background. The lens on your camera is shorter than that, so you're going to have a hard time blurring portrait backgrounds.

The best I can recommend is to put the camera into Portrait mode, put as much distance as possible between the subject and the background, get as close to the subject as possible, and zoom in to the longest focal length you have (remembering that the last two are in conflict).

Jun 14, 2011 | Canon A1200 Digital Camera

Tip

Controlling Depth of Field


A photographed object will only appear sharp in an area a specific distance from the camera. The human eye and brain still accept some areas of the image as acceptably sharp if they lie near the plane of focus and already show a small degree of blur. This zone, which is still in acceptably sharp focus, is called depth of field.

You'd typically want a wide depth of field when shooting landscapes, so as to have everything from the flower in the foreground to the mountains on the horizon in focus. You'd typically want a narrow depth of field for such subjects as portraits and flowers, blurring the background to avoid distractions.

How large this depth of field is depends on the distance to the subject, the aperture, and the focal length of the lens. Whether you're shooting film or digital makes no difference.

If the plane of focus lies further away from the camera, the depth of field is wider than if the camera focuses on an object close by.

Small apertures (large f/numbers) result in a wider depth of field.

Short focal length lenses (wide angle) have a wider depth of field than long focal length lenses (telephoto).

The depth of field is determined by the actual focal length of the lens, not the "35-mm equivalent" often used in the camera specifications. Because most compact cameras have sensors much smaller than SLRs, they have much shorter lenses, giving wider depth of field. This is great for landscapes, not so great for portraits.

To get a narrow depth of field, set the aperture as large as you can (smaller f/numbers), move in close to the subject, and zoom in. If your camera doesn't give you direct control over the aperture, try using the Portrait mode. And yes, the last two items above, moving in close and zooming in, are in opposition, You'll have to decide on the best balance for your picture.

To get a wide depth of field, set the aperture as small as you can (larger f/numbers), move away from the subject, and zoom out. If your camera doesn't give you direct control over the aperture, try using the Landscape mode.

Before going on vacation or shooting your child's wedding, experiment with these factors. Shoot things in your backyard or at a park, trying for both narrow and deep depth of field, then look at the pictures on your computer.

on Jun 23, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

What does 35-88mm mean in feet? This is a telephoto lens on a Nikon F50 SLR. Thank you. Amadeus


35mm is about 0.115 feet (a bit under an inch and a half). 88mm is about .289 feet (a bit under three and a half inches). They refer to the minimum and maximum focal lengths of the zoom lens. They have nothing to do with the distance from the camera to the subject.

The focal length of a lens is a measure of an optical quantity. It may or may not have anything to do with the physical length of the lens.

Jan 10, 2011 | Canon 35-70mm f/3.5-4.5 FD Lens

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How do you take a pic with the Nikon d60 where the background is blurred?


You're trying for what's called a narrow depth of field. DoF is controlled by three factors: distance from camera to subject, lens focal length, and lens aperture. The closer the camera is to the subject, the narrower the DoF. The longer the lens focal length, the narrower the DoF. The larger the lens aperture, the narrower the DoF.

Get as close to the subject as practical, and use as long a focal length as practical. I realize these two aims conflict with each other. For portraits, you want a focal length in the 50-90mm range and move in to fill the frame.

You want to shoot with as wide an aperture as you can. Unfortunately most lenses are not at their sharpest wide open. Also, the 18-55mm lens doesn't open up all that wide, f/3.5 at 18mm and f/5.6 at 55mm. To get the widest aperture, you can shoot in the P or A modes. If you don't want to leave the point&shoot modes, try using the Portrait mode.

Since you're not paying for film, I suggest you experiment with the different settings and shooting setups, moving closer and farther from the subject, using different focal lengths, and using different apertures, and see what results you get.

Nov 22, 2010 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera with 18-55mm lens

1 Answer

I want to take a picture that is focused on the subject, while everything else in the picture is blurry


What you want is a limited depth of field. There are three factors that control the depth of field: subject distance, lens focal length, and lens aperture. The greater the distance, the wider the DoF. The shorter the lens, the greater the DoF. The smaller the aperture, the greater the DoF.

One problem with compact cameras is that they have very small sensors. This means that they have short lenses. And short lenses mean they have wide depth of field. This is often an advantage, in that more of the scene is in focus. Unfortunately, this works against you when you don't want a wide DoF.

At the short end, the S2's lens focal length is 6mm. This will put just about everything in focus. Even at the other end, the focal length is 72mm. With a 35mm film camera, most portrait photographers use lenses at least 85mm in focal length in an attempt to minimize DoF to draw attention to the face and blur the background.

Unfortunately, the best you'll be able to do is to set the camera to the portrait mode, get as close to the subject as possible, and zoom in as much as possible. I realize the last two conflict with each other, you'll just have to find the proper balance for whatever you're photographing.

Nov 18, 2010 | Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

What mode do i use to make a person clear and the background blurry?


It's not the mode, it's the aperture. What you want is called a "narrow depth of field". Depth of field is controlled by three factors: focusing distance, lens focal length, and lens aperture. For portrait work you probably want a focal length in the 50-100mm range and an aperture as large (smaller f/number) as you can get.

How you get the large aperture is up to you. Probably the easiest is to select Aperture-priority mode and crank it as far as it goes.

I encourage you to experiment with it. If you can't get another person to help you, just put an object where you'd prefer to have a head. Use different apertures, and different focal lengths (moving closer or farther to compensate). It's not as if you're paying money for film and processing, after all.

Apr 21, 2010 | Olympus EVOLT E-500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I am trying to take pictures of pennies and I can't get the camera to focus and get a clear picture. Do you have any ideas?


All cameras have a minimum focal length. That is the minimum distance they have to be from an object in order to focus clearly. If you have a digital camera with changeable lenses, that minimum focal length is determined by the lens and how it is constructed. If you have a fixed lens digital camera then the manual should tell you what the minimum focal length is.

One other thing to keep in mind is that on most fixed lens digital cameras, there is what is called a macro setting. If you switch to macro mode, it will allow you to get closer to the object and still get a good focus. Your manual should tell you how to turn on that mode.

Dec 31, 2008 | Cameras

1 Answer

Conversion lenses & filters


These screw on the front of the plastic lens adapter and adjust the focal length. On the side of the adapter lenses it will quote the ratio. My wide angle says 0.66x so just multiply the range of focal lengths by this figure and you will see that it adjusts the camera zoom accordingly - making the image wider and probably also increasing the depth of field (what is in focus). Similarly a 1.5 tele will inrease the range of focal lengths to make the lens "longer" eg higher magnification , useful for astro photography - shots of the moon and terrestrial long distance work but detracting from the depth of field, eg the range of distance over which objects are in focus will be reduced.

The wide angle will allow you to come in close and get WIDE objects fully in-frame- hence "wide angle", while the telephoto will give you better overall maginification of the image but will probably increase the MINIMUM focal length - eg you may not be able to focus on objects closer than >2m (instead of ~1).

The screw-on adapter lenses I found were cheap in a Jessops sale use a 52mm thread, while the S5500 provides a 55mm internal thread. I use an appropriate 55mm to 52mm step down ring adapter. There is slight vignetting (shading around the edge of an image) at certain combinations of zoom, but generally these are very useful accessories.

As these are adapter lenses on the front of an already powerful 10x zoom that must be optically compromised at the price of this camera, there maybe some colour fringeing around bright images. If you want a better solution you really need to get a DSLR. Overall a good solution for the price.


Sep 17, 2008 | Fuji FinePix S5500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Image Properties shown....


1: bias means voltage a neg or plus I assume the plus means more exposure.
2: focal length in feet ..if not using auto-focus
3: 4.6 feet
4: digital zoom is something I would never mess with but 3072/3072 sounds like a 3 megapixal square.
5: yes set the exposure to a fast shutter or bias in your case like - 3
6: why sure and quite a few pics in 1 minute with the right camera.

May 10, 2008 | Cameras

1 Answer

What is the distance at Macro mode?


In wide-angle macro mode, the minimum focus range is as close as 30cm from CCD(21cm from the lens front.) At this point, the magnification is 0.03x (equivalent to 0.12x in 35mm format). (Focal length is7.2mm. At maximum magnification 283mmx213mm of the subject can be captured.) In telephoto macro mode, the minimum focus range is 25cm from CCD(13cm from the lens front )and the magnification is 0.177x (equivalent to 0.7x in 35mm format). (Focal length is42.7mm to 50.8mm. At maximum magnification 50mmx37mm of the subject can be captured.)

Sep 15, 2005 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE A1 Digital Camera

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