Question about Audio Players & Recorders

Open Question

When the tape has finished tapeing for whatever time you set it comes out why

Posted by on

  • castletech
    castletech Dec 03, 2016

    Hi p1549english , I want to help you with your question, but I need more information from you. Can you please add details in the comment box?

×

Ad

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of.(from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones)
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad
  • 275 Answers

SOURCE: rewind

Dear Tim, In all likelihood the belts of your VCR have become old and worn. I suggest you unplug the machine, and open the bottom plate. You will now be able to see the Drive belts. Go to a Spare parts shop and buy a Belts set for your nodel from them, and replace. Also, try changing the REW/FF Idler unit. This should do the trick.

Posted on Oct 01, 2007

Ad
  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: won't except tape

I have a ZR100 that did the same nearly the same thing - but it was only beeping twice. I followed the advice another thread suggested - I banged it twice on the opposite side from the door but it didn't fix it. Then I banged it twice on the side with the tape door.... and now all is well!

I couldn't believe that "fixed" it. Like banging the ol' tube color TV on the side to fix the picture. Maybe it is short lived, but if it holds for the rest of this year until the camcorder Christmas sales begin, I'll be happy!

Posted on Jun 24, 2008

dcxdan
  • 5 Answers

SOURCE: Code 3L117C ???

None that I could find. Trash time for this Sony

Posted on Aug 01, 2008

  • 4 Answers

SOURCE: Won't Eject Tape

same problem, after you hit eject is pops out and never opens up, to the right of the "push" button is an arm with a spring, pushing it back will open that side, on the left side is a pin with an arm you can move the arm back the pin moves and the other side will open as well, wont fix the problem but will get you your tape back.  I have a very upset wife, we had a jvc mini DV went out one winter change in temp killed it instantly, now our canon has sat a few years and wont work either,  we bought a flip video, it works. 

Posted on Nov 16, 2008

sodeep
  • 3267 Answers

SOURCE: VCR won't eject tape - timing of loading mechanism is off

Now-a-days most of the gears are made out of plastic(HDPE, if I remember correctly), when the rewinding command is given even if one gear tooth is worn/broken it will throw the entire timing out of 'gear'. Since the problem has already occurred, and, this is the only function that has malfunctioned my advice would be to leave it as it is! ('cos repairing/replacing it is manual & therefore a costly affair plus there is no guarantee that the replacedment will function properly)....sodeep

Posted on May 09, 2009

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

How to install a audiosouse equalizer (eq 100) onto denon 3805 receiver, without a tape monitor thanks henry


Actually, you have several tape loops: CDR/Tape, VCR1 and VCR2. The bottom right part of Page 7 in the manual shows how to connect a Tape Deck (or any in/out processor).

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

I have a whole array of 2-channel analog processing electronics looped out of one Tape Loop on my AVR - via a dbx 400x Program Route Selector - for making tapes or CD-R Audio recordings and otherwise modifying the analog sound for various purposes.

Aug 12, 2010 | Denon AVR-3805 Receiver

Tip

Fiberglass/Mesh Tape Mythe


I've heard people say many times, " When I finished the drywall on my room addition, I used Mesh Tape
www.all-wall.com/Categories/Fiberglass-Mesh-Drywall-Tape/Thin-Drywall-Mesh-Tape

on my seams and inside corners". Well, I would strongly recommend that you use Paper Tape instead:
www.all-wall.com/Categories/Drywall-Joint-Tape

along with All-Purpose Compound: www.usg.de/index.php?id=1357

Even though Fiberglass/Mesh Tape is much easier to apply than Paper Tape, you should not use it because it has a greater tendency to crack when applied to New Drywall seams; unless you use Easy Sand 45, 90, or 220.
www.lowes.com/pd_11778-325-384210_4294864808+4294851233_4294937087_?productId=3009562&Ns=p_product_prd_lis_ord_nbr'0''p_product_quantity_sold'1&pl=1&currentURL=%2Fpl_SHEETROCK%2BBrand_4294864808%2B4294851233_4294937087_%3FNs%3Dp_product_prd_lis_ord_nbr'0''p_product_quantity_sold'1

The different numbers ( 45, 90, 220) indicate the amount of time, ( in minutes), that you have to work with this material before it starts setting up on you. TIP: I would not recommend this material if you are a beginner! The consistency of this material varies as time goes on, becoming thicker and thicker.

Mesh Tape is good for many other uses though. Such as, a fracture in the drywall, patching around electrical boxes, applying to corner bead as a strengthening material, or removing old tape and re-taping old rough seams in a rehab house.

Good Luck!

If you should have any questions about"Drywall Finishing/Patching", or know someone who does, put your questions to Category:"Tools- Building & Power-HAND TOOLS" at FixYa.com

I will do my best to answer your questions about drywall finishing. However, it would be best if we could speak on the PHONE or do a live CHAT. I can answer any question you have if it involves getting a wall ready for paint!

Thanks for looking,

Jim

Key Words: Drywall/Sheetrock/Gypsum Wallboard

on Sep 29, 2010 | Hand Tools

1 Answer

How do I hook up technics equalizer sh-ge70


This is boilerplate I wrote a long time ago for general eq or sound processors. Without know to what you are connecting, well, read on...

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Mon as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Mon is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

Aug 05, 2010 | Technics SH-GE70 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

How to set up eq70


This is generic advice that should help you.

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Mon as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Mon is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

Aug 04, 2010 | Yamaha EQ-70 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

How to connect all wires to a teac eqa 20


Generic advice that should help:

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.
The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.
In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).
Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.
The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.
EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Mon as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.
In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Mon is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.
Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.
If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

Aug 03, 2010 | Teac Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

How to connect to reciever


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Mon as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Mon is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

Jul 21, 2010 | Technics SH-GE50 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

No, i was looking for free advice


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Mon as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Mon is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In jacks; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out jacks.

If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

Mar 26, 2010 | JVC Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Tape keeps rejecting


Have a look at the recording lugs on the left and right hand side at the rear of the cassette tape case. Check that they are still there and not loose. If you have removed them at sometime to stop it being over-recorded then maybe whatever you use - sellotape, electrical tape, duct tape, has come loose or gone soft. If none of the latter then there must be a problem with that cassette if it is the only one doing that. If it's not the only one then the problem is inside the VCR and will need to be taken to a reputable repair shop or they may do house calls.
Good Luck

Sep 13, 2009 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

VHS player stops


VCR is set with blank tape..Bring up vcr control on TV with television set on Chanel #3, go to menu
Follows procedure for progamming date,time start,time finish,chanel and.speed and single recording.finally click on menu and turn vcr off. Vcr lights indicate set for taping,,.Does no start to tape at requested time and lights indication taping ready stays on ??????

Aug 22, 2007 | Zenith DVR413 DVD Recorder/VCR

1 Answer

Recording of video in order to burn to DVD on a GSA 5169D


put tape on the hole on top of the tapes and you shoud be able to record. its tape on the top or pull the top off i cant remimber which one it is but this is the answer.

Feb 21, 2007 | LG GSA-2166D DVD RW Dual Layer Burner

Not finding what you are looking for?
Audio Players & Recorders Logo

Related Topics:

93 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Audio Players & Recorders Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

 Grubhead
Grubhead

Level 3 Expert

5151 Answers

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

74383 Answers

Are you an Audio Player and Recorder Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...