Question about Pool & Spa

1 Answer

Wirinmg diagram for SEARS12" tablesawMod#11324181 Serial# 7297Poo56

Saw motor says 240 V, orig wiring only has 3-wires 1 grd.,1black 1 white new cord end is 110 volt, motor growls , runs 1/2 speed (like 110 running 220) is there a 3-wire plug end for this saw ?

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Top Expert:

    An expert who has finished #1 on the weekly Top 10 Fixya Experts Leaderboard.

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

  • Master
  • 75,066 Answers

Please contact Sears on this, we do not have these diagrams here.

Posted on Dec 02, 2016

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

I have a 12 inch chraftsman table saw with 2 wires coming from motor. The wiring diagram inside the cap shows it to be wired for 240 how do I wire that thru a switch and to a three wire recepticle


Not quite sure what your question is - Are you trying to plug a 240 into a 110/120 outlet? Or are you trying to plug this into a 240 3 prong outlet?

Traditionally, table saws don't come with a power cord - you must supply one. Usually on the motor there is a metal plate that describes volts/amps/phase/hp etc. Get the Volts/Amps from this plate, then measure the approximate distance between your table saw and the 240 outlet. The gauge of the power cord depends upon the Volt/Amps and the length of the cord. There are many volts/amps vs length for wire gauge conversions on the net. I always get a bigger wire (smaller gauge) than what is recommended. Expect to pay $100 or more for the cord (don't be cheap here). If you have an under rated cord, you can start a fire, burn up your motor, melt plugs into outlets and have to replace the outlet (don't ask how I know).

I'm a little suspicious of the "white and black" wire from 240 - it's usually "white and red" with a "black" ground. 240 is made from two 120's - opposite sine wave. So black is usually the common ground, while the white and red are the two 120's. Volts between white-red=240, white-black=120, red-black=120. If you're absolutely sure that white-black=240, then you can just connect a ground wire to the motor case. Many home table saws can be wired for 240 or 120 - you need to make sure that you're hooking 240v to the correct wires. If you're uncertain at all, then don't do it.

I have wired 120 to a 240 motor by accident and the motor ran - it had no power and didn't spin at full RPM. You can damage a motor this way, so I wouldn't recommend it. I have never put 240 to a 120 motor - so I don't know what happens (guessing you could burn up the motor coils).

With all that being said, if you have 240 outlet with 3 wire receptacle, then just use a multi-meter to determine the 2 "hot" and the 1 ground. Volts from hot1-hot2=240, hot1-ground=120, hot2-ground=120. If you don't have a multi-meter, buy one (approx $12). Once you have it wired up, then try the motor by flipping the switch on then off again. If the motor didn't spin, then you did something wrong. If it hummed but didn't spin, you have some connections wrong inside of the motor. If it spins the wrong way, then your wiring inside of the motor is wrong (doesn't help to flip the wires on the outlet). If you blew a circuit breaker, then the wiring to the motor is wrong.

Sep 27, 2014 | Saws

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.
Comment by gotgeek2, posted on Jan 08, 2010ckuzkuz, I'm a licensed master electrician in 2 states with 30 years in the trade. I've installed a lot of Intermatic timers over the years. I wrote this tip because I saw that a lot of folks were having problems wiring them.

on Mar 07, 2010 | Garden

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


These instructions are for USA residential wiring only.

VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.

on Dec 28, 2009 | Hardware & Accessories

1 Answer

Can a tork timer 1101 be used to control a 240 volt pool pump motor by controlling only 1 lead of the motor thus having the other lead hot all the time?


Yes: 240 volt can be controlled by turning off 1 hot leg of 240V circuit.
But the tork 101 clock motor still requires 120Volts (unless you buy a tork 240volt 201 clock motor to replace the 120volt 101)

Copy following links for handy resource and wiring diagram:
http://waterheatertimer.org/Tork-timers-and-manuals.html#1101

http://waterheatertimer.org/images/Tork-1101-wired-to-control-240.jpg

In the wiring diagram above, it shows white neutral wire running to Tork 1101 timer terminal 2. Bring this white neutral wire from any nearby 120volt outlet.
In event that you do not have this white neutral wire, you can connect ground wire to terminal 2 and that will give 120volts to the 101 clock motor.
Completing circuit to clock motor using ground wire is violation of national electric code for many reasons, however the tiny clock motor only draws 3 watts, and you will remember to bring a white neutral wire to this timer at later date so you can sleep better at night.

Additional resources:
http://waterheatertimer.org/See-inside-main-breaker-box.html

http://waterheatertimer.org/images/Inside-Main-Breaker-Box-12.jpg

Gene
h

Aug 27, 2013 | Hardware & Accessories

1 Answer

Ge timer 15350 110 4 wires 4 post have 2 white on post 1 1 bk on post 2 0 wires on post 3 1 bk on post 4 2 grounds to the box pump will work manually timer will not work


Unknown if this is new installation, or existing install that stopped working.
Copy following link for wiring diagram showing GE 15350 timer:
http://waterheatertimer.org/GE-timers-and-manuals.html#15306

Look at terminal labels, should be L 1 X and 2
Power coming from breaker should be 120Volt Black Hot wire, and White neutral wire.
Cable going to Load should be Black and White.
White wires should be on terminal X
Black Hot should connect to terminals L and 1
Black to Load should connect to terminal 2

If your timer looks different, repost question with link to photo on flickr

If timer stopped working:
GE15350 timer is 120 volt timer made by Tork.
It uses P47 trippers, and Tork 101 clock motor.

Jul 04, 2012 | Hardware & Accessories

1 Answer

2 speed switch wiring dieagram


The motor will have wiring diagram and voltage on nameplate.
You can re-post question with information that shows on nameplate for more exact information, or keep reading below:
If motor is rated for 240Volts, then it will not work with 120V.
If motor is rated for both 120V and 240V, then either Low voltage or high voltage will work, and one wire will be common, and 1 wire will for 120 and other wire for 240.
If motor is rated 120Volt two speed, then one wire will be neutral, and 1 wire low speed, and other wire high speed. You can connect your wire to either low of high, and cap other wire.
If motor is 240volt two speed, then one wire will be common, and 1 wire low speed, and other wire high speed.
If motor is rated 3-phase, then all three wires are connected to the voltage shown on nameplate.
If motor is rated 3-phase two speed, you may need electrician to wire the motor correctly.
http://waterheatertimer.org/pdf/AO-Smith-motor-wiring.pdf

Jun 08, 2012 | Westinghouse Electric Westinghouse...

1 Answer

Low/High Switch wiring for Hayward Superpump


I do not read anywhere that you have a 230V DPDT switch which you will need in order to select the high or low speed. You will have 6 terminalas on the switch. Line connections usually go to the middle set. Put put sides of one pole to the common terminal and put one of the other posts to the hi and the other to the low terminal. I prefer to use am on-off-on switch so the switch in the middle turns off the pump. Flip it one way for hi and the other for low. If you post your stock number from the two-speed motor I could give you a more accurate diagram if you need it. Generally, 1 is common, 2 hi and 3/4 low.

Apr 26, 2010 | Pool & Spa

1 Answer

T103 clock not working


Please read all of this post. You may burn up the 120 volt T103 timer motor is you are not careful.

The statement: "I have 120v board with 120 constant and 240 timed" is not very clear to me as to what you mean.

In US residential wiring, the white wire is not always the "neutral;" The white wire is sometimes used for 240 volt circuits.

We cannot tell you how to wire your timer unless we know _exactly_ what you have.

If your incoming supply cable (from the breaker box) has 3 wires (black, white, and bare), there are two scenarios:

1...If the voltage from black (hot) to white (ALSO hot in this case) is 240 volts, and you have only 3 wires (black, white, and bare), then the T103 is the _wrong_ timer if you are trying to control a 240 volt load. You should use a T104 timer.

The T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor and the T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor.

2...If the voltage between black and white is 120 volts, then you will only be able to control 120 volt loads; then the incoming black supply wire is connected to terminal 3 and the white (neutral) wire is connected to the "A" terminal. The bare equipment grounding wire is then connected to the "GR" terminal.

To show the difference, if you are trying to control a 240 volt load, to use a T103 and wire it _correctly_, you would need to have a incoming supply cable with a total of 4 wires (black, red, white (neutral), and bare) Black to red would be 240 volts. Black to white would be 120 volts. Red to white would be 120 volts.
The connections would be as follows:
White (neutral in this case) to the "A" terminal
Black to terminal 1
Red to terminal 3
The 240 volt load would then connect to terminals 2 and 4
Both the bare equipment grounding wires are connected to the "GR" terminal.

Since you did not mention a red wire, I can only ASSUME that this is not the case.

Sorry, we can't tell you how to wire this timer based upon assumptions.

So, what do you have?


Dec 23, 2009 | Intermatic T103 Indoor 120-Volt 40-amp...

1 Answer

Replacing a worn out cord on my old black and decker worm drive saw. Where do the white black and green wires from the new cord go? The terminal on the switch only have a 1 and 2 printed on them.


YOU HAVE 5 WIRES
2 FROM MOTOR
3 NEW WIRE
1 FROM THE MOTOR AND
1 FROM THE CORD SHOULD BE JOIN TOGETHER.
THE OTHER FROM THE MOTOR SHOULD BE JOIN TO THE SWITCH ALONG WITH THE OTHER WIRE FROM THE POWER CORD
AND THE GREEN WITH YELLOW LINES
IS TO GROUND TO ANY METAL ON THE SAW.

Apr 25, 2009 | Saws

Not finding what you are looking for?
Pool & Spa Logo

Related Topics:

176 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Pool & Spa Experts

Jay Finke
Jay Finke

Level 3 Expert

1338 Answers

Bill Jordan

Level 2 Expert

372 Answers

David Spradling
David Spradling

Level 3 Expert

3543 Answers

Are you a Pool and Spa Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...