Question about Canon PowerShot S5 IS Digital Camera

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External flash interferring with lighting

My camera over compensates when using an "off the camera" extra flash to help with more light. The photo ends up being darker than just using the normal flash on the camera.

How can I stop the light bounce with just using my flash and using other light source without my camera being too sensitive.

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Re: External flash interferring with lighting

Its not clear which camera you are using and there may be different solutions to your problem....

All SLR digital cameras and most of the "higher grade" digital cameras have an option whereby you can adjust the intensity of the camera's flash. This can make the world of difference.

Then you also have the option of setting the flash synchronisation to respond to what Canon call "First curtain" or "second curtain". This can make a huge difference. If your camera is set for the flash to fire at first curtain, it fires as the shutter opens; and as it closes on second curtain. Sounds technical, but it is worth checking, as there is a difference.

You should also check what your settings are for the "off camera" flash. Synchronisation is key. It sounds as tho your off camera flash is way out of sync

Posted on Apr 10, 2008

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Why is the white background not white?

This is a common problem. The metering and light balance are the reasons that you are having problems achieving good results with your photos.

All cameras on the auto cycle are calibrated for 18% gray. Another words a photo of all white results in 18% gray. A photo of black results in 18% gray. The camera adjusts the shutter speed and aperture to achieve an average light level of 18%. That is why photos of snow always appear gray. To compensate for this characteristic of the cameras an 18 % gray panel is held in front of the camera and than the settings are set.manually. The metering in the camera is now locked and using the same light levels objects will be in their natural level.

A second problem is the white balance. Using flash avoids some of these problems. Adjusting the camera for source lighting type will help the most. The light balance is the cause of discoloration of the objects in the photo. Usually the camera white balance can be set for auto, incandescent, fluorescent, outdoor or flash,

Use a manual setting if it is available on you camera, You need to adjust the settings until you get acceptable results. If the photo is dark add light by reducing the aperture number to a lower number allowing more light. After the aperture is open wide(lowest number) increase the exposure to longer time. With very low light levels a tripod may be necessary.. After doing this once record the numbers for next time.

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Portrait provides extra sharp focus on the subject. It also opens the aperture some, and may in SOME cases give you a blurred backbround depending on the distance of the subject and background to the camera.

If outdoors, consider setting the camera to manual flash so that it will lighten the subject. If indoors, consider turning off the flash. You may need to provide better external lighting on the subject, or use a tripod and ask the subject to hold still during the picture.

Try increasing the zoom (best is to set it to maximum), and then adjust your distance from the subject to get as close as possible. Note that you still might be standing relatively far away because of the zoom.

Another way to experiment further with focus and blurred backgrounds is to use aperture priority (Av) mode on your dial. Use the right/left button to set the lowest "f-number" on your screen. The lower the number, the greater the aperture. All other functions of your camera will automatically compensate. Again, use max zoom in taking closeups with low "f-numbers". Also experiment with the manual focus to pay particular attention to achieving sharp focus on your subjects eyes.

You have a very capable camera. It can do what you're thinking of. You just need to practice with it. It's digital, experiment with the above techniques. Throw away the bad pics and keep the good, noting which technique worked best for the lighting and situation.

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Canon Powershot SLR takes fuzzy photos

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Taking photos

Set the camera flash to auto. A digital camera will automatically use all available light to take a picture, and will only use extra light (the flash) if it needs to.
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1 Answer

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