Question about Bushnell NorthStar Goto 100mm 788840 Maksutov-Cassegrain Compact Telescopes

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Viewing we cannot view the planets or stars. the moon comes in great, but anything else looks identical which is a white circle with a black center and 3 black lines goinging through it in the shape of a peace sign, help please, I have contacted the 800 number for the product, they have no idea. my telescope is not on your list. it is northstar goto model 78-8831 76mm reflector.

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Re: viewing

Take it back where you got it for replacement

Posted on Nov 19, 2007

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Seeing the stars

The stars will always be "points in the sky" no matter what telescope.
The stars should be sharp, focused points in the center of view (more blurry towards the edges because of the stock eyepieces and the fast telescope mirror) if not, the telescope may need collimation. (look at instructions and/or search online. Plenty of instructions on the net.)
  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
  2. During the day, point the telescope at a part of the landscape about 100 yards away.
  3. Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) in the focal tube.
  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. If the scope is on a EQ mount, polar align.
  8. Point the finder at the moon. The moon should be in the main scope also.
  9. Practice finding the moon before you start on the planets
  10. Once you are comfortable with the moon and planets, you can go for the deep sky objects

Dec 23, 2012 | Telescopes

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Hi ive got a galaxsee tasco telescope but im having trouble seeing anything at night, i've took all the caps off lined up on a star but its just pitch black can you help thanks.

1. During the day, point the scope towards an object and align the finder scope to the telescope.
2. First object at night should be the moon. it will verify your finderscope alignment and you should have a clear view of the moon.
3. Use your lowest power eyepiece (largest number in mm) and point the finderscope to a star. The star should be in the center of the eyepiece.. If not, adjust the finder until it and the scope are centered.
4. You can use your higher power lens on the star nd it should still be in the FOV (field of view)
5. Scope may need to be aligned (collimated). Instructions on this should be included with the scope

Mar 10, 2011 | Tasco Galaxsee 46114375 (375 x 114mm)...

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Hi, a few days back I purchased Nexstar 4SE. I set it up exactly how it says in the manual still I cannot see any magnifying views from the eye piece. While aligning the telescope I can find the moon from...

Stars will always appear as points. It is not possible to magnify them enough to see them as disks because they are all extremely far away. A telescope will however show you stars and other objects that are too dim to see with the naked eye.

You will be able to see the planets as disks, and even features on the planets, such as the bands on Jupiter, the rings of Saturn and the phases of Venus, and also moons around some planets. There are other objects that will show more detail when magnified, such as nebula. You will be able to see a lot of craters and other detail on the Moon.

Your problem is simply that you are not pointing the telescope at these objects. This seems to be one of those telescopes that "automatically" finds objects, but these so called "go to" scopes only do this when they are set up properly. I can't say what step(s) you have missed, but clearly even if the scope thinks it is pointed at the moon, if you can't see the moon, it is NOT pointed there. The Moon will fill the field of view even with the least powerful eyepiece. If you are seeing stars as points, then the eyepiece is focussed and working properly.

Jan 13, 2011 | Celestron NexStar 4 SE Telescope

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I can't see anything out of the large scope

Use the 20mm to view an object (building, tree etc.) far away during the daytime. Align the finderscope to the object.
To view the moon, leave the scope out to equalize the temperature for at least 1/2 hour. Use the 20mm and no barlow. Point the scope towards the moon by sighting along the barrel of the scope, then use the finder to zero in on the moon. You may then switch to the 4mm eyepiece. for a more magnified view of the moon. You will have to keep moving the telescope because of the earth's rotation. The higher the magnification, the more you will have to adjust the scope. Because of the cheap finderscope, finding the planets will be difficult. Best to always sight down the length of the scope to get you close. The planets will be small and indistinct.
This is not a astronomical telescope! May be used for views of the moon but the cheap mount is not suitable for other planets. Max power would be 225x NOT 420x as advertised. The erecting prism is for terrestrial use only.
Nothing discourages an amateur astronomer more than a toy store telescope. My advise would be to use this scope for nature watching and go buy a good telescope (Meade, Celestron, Orion etc.). Even Those 60mm refractors are superior to this! A descent scope would cost a minimum of $200

Nov 03, 2010 | Bushnell Deep Space 78-9512 (120 x 60mm)...

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I"ve been an amateur astronomer for "over" forty years, started when i was eight. Stars aren't that impressive, most look the same....i spend my telescope time with a cheap $200 21/2 inch "Refractor" and have seen all planets except pluto, i had to use a 41/2 inch refractor just to be able to view Neptune and just barely saw it and yes it was Blue!! Refractors are best for planet viewing. Dont waste your time with viewing Mercury or Venus...not impresive! The best looking (but not in the next few years because of ring alignment) is Saturn...hurry up and you might still get a chance to see the rings a little before they go into what i call hibernation mode, they'll make a straight inclination though the planet which makes for not so impressive most impressive and one i view the most is Jupiter and its for moons Calisto, Ganymede Io, and will always see these in different orbits. But i just use a pair or Celestron Binoculars 15 x 70s..i use them to look at the Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Comets, overhead comunication Satilites passing bye..and the most awsome of them all the "Orion nebula" colors are outstanding, and if your real good at knowing your constellations you can locate the Andromeda Galaxy. It'll look like a buffy cotton ball with binoculars..dont view the sky ever with a full makes for poor viewing,but this is where the Reflectors like a 4"Newtonion or lot bigger like at least an eight inch Cassigrain..these telescope are made to view whats called "faint fuzzies", Nebulas, Galaxies, star clusters etc. 40 years ago i cold look up in my local skys and not have to worry about light i go out to the deserts with just my binoculars...they are so convienient. Start to learn the sky with"ll be well worth it! The one Great thing about binocs is that everything you view is right side up as opposed to telecopes upsidedown. To locate planets they will track within 10 degrees in the path that the sun takes. If you look and see some really bright stars that dont twinkle, chances are that it will be Jupiter, Saturn or Venus..but you will only see Venus in the early mornings or late evenings..Mars is a little trickier, sometimes its small and red and every few years it can be as bright as Jupiter when its at it closest to the earth!
type in this link i think above i think you enjoy! later.

Apr 02, 2010 | Galileo (G118DX) Telescope

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Can't view anything at night.

It sounds like you have a Newtonian or Cassegrain reflector.  The black circle is the secondary mirror.  You need to insert an eyepiece into the focuser in order to properly use it.

Apr 24, 2009 | Telescopes

2 Answers

Can't see anything but moon

You apparently broke the focus knob-- in that small telescope you will be lucky to ever get 100x--- use only the lower power eyepiece, or return it as you said.

Here is the telescope that I recommend to beginners-- they come in various sizes depending on how much you want to spend. BIGGER costs more.

Apr 15, 2009 | Vivitar (1607225) Telescope

1 Answer

Telescope is only good for viewing!!!

your scope is 565mm focal length with a 60mm objective which makes it f:9.5. (telescope focal length divided by lens diameter)
all this means that the optics are capable of viewing larger planets. nebula is a bit of a stretch. maybe under exceptionally dark skies with at least 30min. of dark adaptation. brighter objects like m42 or m31 should be visible, bear in mind that only very large telescopes will resolve the slightest hint of color in nebulosity. the rest of us are reserved to gray scale. i would suggest using a 26mm eyepiece plossl if available. next make sure your finding system is aligned to the scope. this is best done during the day at a distant object like a radio tower. center the object in the eyepiece then align the finder.
next get your self a good sky map like stellarium software a freebie and a fav. to ensure your looking at what you think your looking at.

a word on eyepiece selection. magnification is calculated by dividing the focal length of the scope by the focal length of the eyepiece. for instance the scope is 565mm the recommended eyepiece is 26mm so the magnification would be around 22x.
a rule of thumb for optics is about 50x per inch of objective. which means your scope is good for about 100x. so by the math you would use a 5.6mm e.p. to achieve 100x, however as optical powers increase field of view decreases making it difficult to find objects. find your object with a wide field e.p. then switch to a higher power to zoom in. if the image gets fuzzy at high power attempt to refocus, if it doesn't clean up either your asking a bit to much from the scope or seeing conditions in the upper atmosphere may not be ideal. what ever you do don't give up there are some amazing things to see out there.

Nov 23, 2008 | Bushnell Voyager 78-9565 (120 x 60mm)...

2 Answers

Telescope venture rx9 view blocked

I have this same issue. A star or planet is vlocked by a circle with 3 prongs - like the mirror holder in the tube.

Jun 13, 2008 | Bushnell 675x5 EQ Reflector Telescope

2 Answers

Viewing planets and stars

The problem is you are way out of focus. Turn the focus knob alot, until the star image gets much much smaller. Keep going until it looks like a pin point or a star!. The spider vane and center black dot will disappear. This black dot is actually the secondary diagonal mirror reflection in the primary mirror. The peace signs are the secondary supports. Use the lowest power eye pieces. I would not use the Barlow lens that comes with this scope as it very poor quality. Also, using this high power with this small an aperature (tube diamter) & unstable mount will be very difficult indeed. Invest in some wide angle, long eye relief low power lens. Use these for a while before going to higher powers.

Nov 19, 2007 | Bushnell NorthStar 78-8831 (525 x 76mm)...

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