Question about Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

The fuse on the control circuit on the inside unit keeps tripping One side of the fuse goes to the thermostat the other side goes to the control board the fuse blew about a week ago let the unit sit for a week while we were out of town. put another fuse in it ran for 5 days fuse blew again let unit sit for 2 hours then the fuse held not sure what to check

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

  • Master
  • 614 Answers

Its hard to say without being there but here are somethings to check. Outside check the thermastat wire onthe condensing unit. I have this problem a lot down on the gulf coast. The wind blows and cause the Tsat wire to rub against the unt and it shorts the fuse. Will run for a while till a storm or winds come up check this first. Next could be bad contactor or relay but most likely the tsat wire. Check back and let me know please. Russ

Posted on Jul 18, 2009

  • James Stopp
    James Stopp Jul 18, 2009

    Its hard to say without being there but here are somethings to check. Outside check the thermastat wire onthe condensing unit. I have this problem a lot down on the gulf coast. The wind blows and cause the Tsat wire to rub against the unt and it shorts the fuse. Will run for a while till a storm or winds come up check this first. Next could be bad contactor or relay but most likely the tsat wire. Check back and let me know please. Russ

×

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

What runs on the .3amp fuse?


look on inside cover of control unit it has a schematic

Jul 04, 2014 | Balboa Instruments Pool & Spa

1 Answer

The difference between thermal fuse and thermostat


Thermal fuse is a heat-sensitive safety feature that shuts down system when overheating is detected.
In electrical wiring, the thermal fuse reacts to high temperature caused by too many amps on the electric circuit. When temperature exceeds the fuse amp rating, then the fuse trips and cuts power to electric circuit.
Example of thermal fuse is a household circuit breaker.
Gas water heaters have a different type of thermal fuse located in the combustion chamber or on the combustion chamber door, and also inside a copper probe inside water tank. Water heater thermal fuses will trip when water temperature exceeds fuse rating, or when heat inside the combustion chamber exceeds temperature rating of fuse. This action will cut off gas supply to water heater.
So a thermal fuse is a safety feature.

Thermostat is not a safety feature.
Thermostat is a measuring tool.
Thermostats measure temperature.
Example of thermostat is outdoor thermometer, or cooking thermometer, or Heat-AC control located on wall inside house.
Thermostats can give a simple temperature reading, or they can cause a separate control to turn on-off depending on application.
For example thermostat on Heat-AC will read room temperature, and when temperature exceeds setting, this triggers a switch that turns Heat-AC on-off.

Many appliances have both thermal safety fuse and thermostat.
Take for example a gas water heater. A copper tube extends into the water tank. Inside the copper tube are 2 things: A thermostat probe to measure water temperature, and a thermal fuse called an ECO for energy cut off. The ECO is a thermal fuse, and is a safety feature.
http://waterheatertimer.org/images/Gas-valve-ECO2-358.jpg
The thermostat reads temperature of water, and turns water heater on-off to keep water hot. A person can adjust water temperature by adjusting the thermostat dial on front of water heater.
However if the thermostat fails, or some other problem occurs, and water inside the tank gets hotter than 180 degrees, then the ECO or thermal fuse will trip. When the thermal fuse trips, this turns off gas to the water heater so water cannot get any hotter. The safety device prevents water heater explosion. The water heater must be repaired since this particular thermal fuse cannot be re-used afterwards, and must be replaced.

Oct 11, 2012 | Dryers

1 Answer

Difference between thermostat and thermal fuse


Hello Mary
Thermal fuse is a heat-sensitive safety feature that shuts down system when overheating is detected.
In electrical wiring, the thermal fuse reacts to high temperature caused by too many amps on the electric circuit. When temperature exceeds the fuse amp rating, then the fuse trips and cuts power to electric circuit.
Example of thermal fuse is a household circuit breaker.
Gas water heaters have a different type of thermal fuse located in the combustion chamber or on the combustion chamber door, and also inside a copper probe inside water tank. Water heater thermal fuses will trip when water temperature exceeds fuse rating, or when heat inside the combustion chamber exceeds temperature rating of fuse. This action will cut off gas supply to water heater.
So a thermal fuse is a safety feature.

Thermostat is not a safety feature.
Thermostat is a measuring tool.
Thermostats measure temperature.
Example of thermostat is outdoor thermometer, or cooking thermometer, or Heat-AC control located on wall inside house.
Thermostats can give a simple temperature reading, or they can cause a separate control to turn on-off depending on application.
For example thermostat on Heat-AC will read room temperature, and when temperature exceeds setting, this triggers a switch that turns Heat-AC on-off.

Many appliances have both thermal safety fuse and thermostat.
Take for example a gas water heater. A copper tube extends into the water tank. Inside the copper tube are 2 things: A thermostat probe to measure water temperature, and a thermal fuse called an ECO for energy cut off. The ECO is a thermal fuse, and is a safety feature.
http://waterheatertimer.org/images/Gas-valve-ECO2-358.jpg
The thermostat reads temperature of water, and turns water heater on-off to keep water hot. A person can adjust water temperature by adjusting the thermostat dial on front of water heater.
However if the thermostat fails, or some other problem occurs, and water inside the tank gets hotter than 180 degrees, then the ECO or thermal fuse will trip. When the thermal fuse trips, this turns off gas to the water heater so water cannot get any hotter. The safety device prevents water heater explosion. The water heater must be repaired since this particular thermal fuse cannot be re-used afterwards, and must be replaced.

Oct 11, 2012 | Dryers

1 Answer

Microwave and display panel are not working. There is power to the electrical ground fault interruptor box and it is not tripped. Could it be the fuse inside the unit itself? I can see a fuse behind the...


Since you posted this under model KHMS105EBL, I'll assume that's your model number.

There should be a "mini-manual" (tech sheet) hidden inside the unit behind the control panel or hidden on the left side behind the grille, which is very helpful when troubleshooting, testing, and locating components.

If you don't find your mini-manual, or if you want to look at it before removing the controller, you can download it here (just enter your full model number with no dashes).

You can also find helpful exploded views and order parts here.

This model has a line fuse, an oven cavity thermostat, and a magnetron thermostat, any of which can render the oven "dead".

If those components are good, then you may a problem with the control circuit board. More info here.

Accessing some components (like the oven cavity thermostat) for testing and possible replacement will require you to remove the oven from the wall.

If so, the installation instructions are very handy, and it's best to have two people since the microwave can be heavy and awkward.

You can download Whirlpool / Kitchenaid owner's manuals and installation instructions here.

If you need more help, let us know.

We're happy to help you with free advice and we'd appreciate your thoughtful rating of our answer.

Aug 10, 2010 | KitchenAid KHMS105EBL Microwave Oven

1 Answer

My 4yr old Amana heat pump quit working - the thermostat display was blank. I replaced the thermostat but still no luck after confirming it was installed correctly. My S/N is 0407477962, Model VNC60C2A,...


Your thermostat can get power from either of two power souces. Primary power would be 24 VAC from a transformer mounted inside your air handler. Second (optional) power may be provided from battery backup, with the batteries mounted inside the thermostat itself.

Since your display went completely blank, then I would venture to guess that it is related to the 24 VAC circuit, sourced from the air handler. You probably do not have battery back up. Use a DVOM (Digital Volt Ohm Meter) to measure the RED wire connected to your thermostat. Make sure to use the VAC setting on the DVOM.

The "hot" side is the red wire, and will be connected to the "R" terminal in your thermostat. The Common side will be connected to most likely a blue, a black, or a brown wire. The Common terminal will be labeled "C" (but perhaps B) on your thermostat.

Since the thermostat is just plain dead you should next locate and check the fuse or breaker for the air handler control circuitry. There may be multiple different breakers/fuses for your heat pump's outdoor circuitry, its indoor controls, and its indoor resistive heat strips. Also, the circuit could be either 120 VAC or 240 VAC. Has one of them tripped or blown a fuse?

If you have breakers, then flip all of your breakers off and then back on. Stay near the breaker box and wait for a minute, listening/looking to see if any breaker has tripped or if a fuse has blown. Otherwise, if the circuit is fused, then examine or test the fuse. Again, use your DVOM, this time in the Ohms setting. Zero Ohms indicate the fuse is good. A very high Ohms reading is a blown fuse (infinite resistance) In this case, verify that the blown fuse is the CORRECT value. Maybe it isn't. Replace it with the correct amperage fuse. Again, wait a few moments and see if it the new fuse blows.

If either the new fuse immediately blows, or if the flipped breaker immediately trips, then STOP and call a professional. You have a high-power wiring problem. Call around, and find an expert. It could be that a mouse chewed thru some insullation. You don't know, but don't be sold on replacing an expensive component without verifiable proof of the source of the problem.

Otherwise, go back and check your 24 VAC "R" Red terminal at the thermostat. If it reads 24VAC hot now, then you have solved the problem, at least temporarily. You now need to know why the breaker tripped or the fuse blew.

If the circuit is on a breaker, then just replace it. They really do go bad after a while. Pop the old breaker out and bring it with you to the hardware store. Replace it with the correct brand, amperage, and configuration.

If the circuit was on a fuse, then (a) was it really the correct amperage rating? or (b) is there a chance that you had a hit from the power company or a nearby lightening strike? (probably not, or some of your computer/stereo/other stuff would have been knocked out too.)

Otherwise, you know the source circuits are good, and you know you don't have 24VAC at the "R" terminal of your thermostat. There are now more possibile causes.... to be continued. Marty

Dec 09, 2009 | Amana PTH123B25AJ Heat Pump Air...

1 Answer

Goodman GMP75... keeps blowing fuses only in A/C mode. Only when I connect yellow wire from thermostat to line going to condenser contactor (24V side).


Are you talking about the small 3 or 5 amp fuse in the furnace? If you are then the control voltage circuit to the condenser is shorted, Maybe dogs or rodents chewing it or the insulation is cut by a sharp piece of metal. Sometimes the contactor will go bad and cause the small fuse in furnace to blow. Look for the simple things first, like control wires shorted. Make sure the yellow wire from the thermostat goes to the outside unit and not to the common.

Jun 30, 2009 | Goodman GMS90703BXA Heater

1 Answer

Both inside and outside units did not come on in cool mode


hi there,
thermostat located on your evaporator is adevice where in if temperature set up is acquired the power source will cut off until on specific time that when small heat absorbed thermostat will activate again or this auto activated.meaning there is a differtianl temperature acquited to run this device.this depent how you set up your temperature setting.the over load protection device located mostly on control panel is one tripping off.this is the device you have to reset in order to run the unit again if malfunction., if short circuited or highr current occured on compressor this device protect your motor to burn it will trip off your unit.several factors you can consider in tripping unit,fan motor not running,dirty evaporator and condenser,loosen wiring connection and faulty wiring.sometimes circuit on panel board are envaded by insect mostly ants they need heat for there egg to hatch, they davastated the circuit.check on this.have a nice day don't forgert to rate me thank's.

Apr 12, 2009 | Friedrich QuietMaster Electronic SS12J30D...

1 Answer

Jgp963 shorting out


What do you mean you 'placed container on all five knobs'?

Apart from that it sounds like you have a faulty lead, or the contacts inside the unit have short circuited. This is the only thing that could be causing a continuous circuit and tripping the fuse.

Jan 02, 2008 | GE 36 in. Profile JGP963 Stainless Steel...

2 Answers

Carrier air conditioner


Sounds like you either blew a transformer, have a bad circuit breaker or blew the main fuse in the outside disconnect. If the indoor unit is still blowing air (no matter what temperature) start looking at the power supply to the outdoor unit. From the circuit breaker, the power will go to a small box located within a few feet from the outside unit. This box will have either a lever on the side or you will be able to open the box and pull out the fuses. From this box the power goes to the condensor. The first thing you should do is to turn off the breaker to the outside unit. Flip it back on and if you have a call for cooling, after about 3 minutes the outdoor unit should start. If it does not, shut off power again to the unit by switching off the breaker, go outside and pull out the fuses in the disconnect box. Using a multi meter, check for continuity thru the fuses. If you have continuity, call your technician. If one or both fuses show no sign of continuity, replace the fuse(s). Make sure that the thermostat is working and sending a signal to the indoor air handler. You may be able to check this by turning the fan switch to "Fan" and see if the blower turns on. You may just have a bad thermostst. Caution should be used anytime you are near electrical components. If you do not have the skill-set required to test electrical equipment, leave it to a proffessional.

Sep 03, 2007 | Carrier 38CKC036 Air Conditioner

Not finding what you are looking for?
Heating & Cooling Logo

Related Topics:

67 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Heating & Cooling Experts

paulcarew

Level 3 Expert

2458 Answers

Dan Webster
Dan Webster

Level 3 Expert

8220 Answers

Donni Steen

Level 3 Expert

659 Answers

Are you a Heating and Cooling Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...