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Can someone please explain how to link up outboard EQ/comp to my Fostex 160? Advice most appreciated! Best, Stu. I want to linkup a TL Audio 5013 EQ and a 5051 Compressor to my Fostex 160. What method would give best results? Thanking you for your help!

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  • Garth Urie
    Garth Urie May 11, 2010

    Hiya, on the back there 4 jacks "send/recieve" These are your interface connections. You will need a Stereo Jack plug where the tip goes to one jack and the ring to another jack (the grounds are common). Plug the stereo jack to send/recieve then the jack that connects to the ring (centre connection) goes to the input of EQ, then the out of the EQ goes to the IN of the COMP (new cable) then the out of the COMP goes back the the other jack plug (tip) which is the return on the desk. They are now patched into whichever channel you have selected. Make sense??? Best of luck

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Hiya, you will need to make up a new jack cable with a stereo jack that then leads to 2 mono jacks. The tip goes to one jack and the ring goes to the second jack. In the Fostex there are 4 SEND/RECIEVE sockets. these are the interface jacks. Plug the stero jack into one of them Then the jack that connects to the ring goes to input of the EQ, the OUT of the EQ goes to IN of the COMP and then OUT of the COMP goes back the other Jack plug connected to the tip (the grounds are common byt he way and connected together in the stereo jack). The EQ and COMP are now connected into that channel you have chosen. See pic attached

Best of luck!!Can someone please explain how to link up outboard - 3f1796c.jpg

Posted on Jul 16, 2009

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How to connect my eq to my harman kardon recevier model avr-247


The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.


Okay, back to the hook-up:


Any of the following audio connections on the HK will work: Tape, Vid1 or Vid 2.


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.


So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Feb 04, 2011 | Harman Kardon Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

How do I link my technics ge 70 graphic equaliser to my technics cd player sl-pd7a and my technics md player sj-md100 with phono rca leads . Thank you Simon


It would help to know what other electronics (receiver, maybe?) is involved.

If neither of those devices is a recorder, why do you need to connect them to the EQ when your receiver/preamp may have the facilities to connect the two playback devices directly; and the EQ in a Tape Loop?

Scenario A)

Assuming you REALLY want to have the CD and MD input through the EQ because you can't attach them any other way...

CD audio OUT to Line In; MD audio OUT to Playback;

EQ LINE OUT to whatever analog electronic inout you have in mind.

To hear and Equalize the CD set the Input Selector to Source, EQ REC button OFF; to hear the MD equalized set the Input Selector to Tape, EQ REC button OFF.

====

Scenario B:

You have a receiver with only ONE Line Level Aux input and a Tape Loop.

Insert the EQ in the Tape Loop. Attach one of the disc players to AUX and the other to the TAPE conenctions on the EQ.

====

Scenario C

You have a Home Theater System or Audio Vido Reciever.

The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.


Okay, back to the hook-up:


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.


So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Feb 01, 2011 | Technics Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

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No. When you select multi-in you bypass everything in the receiver so you would have no program source exiting the receiver to the EQ.

Use it in the standard MD/CD-R slot.

The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.


Okay, back to the hook-up:


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Rec-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Play-Out.


So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

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