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Hi i can use the focus scope to focus but the eyepiece lenses are still blury This is my first telescope and i want to star and planet watch with it. I can see and focus the focus scope but upon looking into eyepiece with barlow lense with h20mm attach it is fuzzy and blury cannot see anything thankyou

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  • diannejca645 Jul 16, 2009

    Hi thankyou i have just found out it is a f1000114 sturnam short tube reflector and would like to know more about them if you have any info that would be great cheers

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Don't use the barlow - it's too much magnification for such a small telescope.

Posted on Jul 16, 2009

  • Joe Lalumia aka TelescopeMan

    Download one of the Meade REFLECTOR manuals located on this web site. Look under REFLECTORS for one similar to your telescope.
    http://www.meade.com/manuals/index.html

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I have a T1000HD telescope . I was wondering what I need to do to be able to see planets such as Mars, Jupiter and Saturn's rings. Is it just a matter of getting different eyepieces? If so what kind?


That scope came with a 25 mm and a 10 mm eyepiece, which will give about a x40 and a x100 magnification respectively. If the seeing is good (clear sky, not dusty or windy, and the planet not too low (at least 30 deg up from the horizon) you should get a reasonable view of the planets, with these ep's

If you do not have any ep's you could buy 2 or 3 plossl type ep's (nothing more expensive is justified) of say 10 mm, 25 mm, and 32 mm. It looks like it takes ep's with a 1.25" barrel.

The theoretical limiting power of your scope is about x 220, which is about a 4 mm eyepiece, but at that extreme you will find the viewing object is dim, fuzzy, hard to get into the field of view, hard to focus, and totally frustrating.

Sadly this scope is just not a very good one, sorry to sound elitist. One of the issues will be that of collimation (optical alignment). You can never properly focus the scope unless it is collimated. Reflector scopes (with a mirror) all have this difficulty. You can tell if it is collimated with a star test

http://garyseronik.com/no-tools-telescope-collimation/

There should be 3 screws on the bottom end of the scope, where the mirror is. These are the collimation screws. Have somebody screw these in and out while you look through the ep. Remember you can only assess the collimation when the defocussed star image is right in the middle of your view.
.

Dec 12, 2016 | Optics

1 Answer

30 year old telescope. do lenses go bad?


General tips
  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
  2. During the day, point the telescope at a part of the landscape about 100 yards away. NEVER THE SUN!
  3. Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) in the focal tube.
  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. Point the finder at the moon. The moon should be in the main scope also.
  8. Practice finding the moon before you start on the planets
  9. Once you are comfortable with the moon and planets, you can go for the deep sky objects
Specific:
You can clean the lenses by using a camera brush/puffer. For stains: 1 part distilled water 1 part 97% or better isopropyl alcohol. Use a cotton ball to apply. One stroke per ball. Dry with cotton balls working form the center out.
The eyepieces you have are pretty poor. I suspect they are also 0.965 diameter. If so, go to Ebay and get 2 or 3 MA (modified achromat) or Kelner eyepieces They are very inexpensive.Your H20 (lowest power) is not too bad but very narrow field of view.
If your scope uses 1.25 inch diameter eyepieces, your options are too wide to expound here.
You will get a good, low power view of the moon with the 20mm but the sr4's eye relief (distance your eye has to be to the top of the eyepiece to focus) may make it difficult

Jul 09, 2013 | Swift 860R (175 x 60mm) Telescope

1 Answer

I cannot focus my se8


That is a good telescope. I am unsure about what adjustments you are trying out, so please excuse me if I get too basic here:

The focus adjustment will not give you an enlargement, it only brings objects to a sharp image. I trust that is OK for you.

To gain an enlargement of something, you must use a different eyepiece with a shorter focal length, say from 25mm to 12mm. The magnification you will get is the focal length of your scope, 2032mm, divided by the focal length of the eyepiece, say 2032/25, giving you magnification of x81 with that eyepiece.

There is a practical limit to this, which for your scope is about x400, (an eyepiece of 5mm) in excellent conditions at the top of a mountain. For terrible seeing from a suburban backyard, it will be say half that, x200, or an eyepiece of 10mm. You will get the best viewing with a magnification of say x150 at the most, or an eyepiece of 15mm. Less is more.

Then, you will not ever see the true disk of a star with that scope, they are too far away. You will however magnify the image of a planet, star cluster, nebula, or binary star pair. Sometimes though that will be at the cost of image clarity, it depends on where you are at the time.

Mar 17, 2012 | Celestron NexStar 8 SE (480 x 203mm)...

1 Answer

We cant see anything but black


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 24, 2011 | Vivitar (1607225) Telescope

1 Answer

Cannot see anything in the telescope looks dark


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 09, 2011 | Meade DS-2114 ATS (325 x 114mm) Telescope

2 Answers

All we see through the telescope is black


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 08, 2011 | Tasco Novice 30060402 (402 x 60mm)...

1 Answer

I cant see anything through my telescope


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 07, 2011 | Meade 60AZ-M Jupiter Telescope 60mm...

1 Answer

I cannot see anything and what is the finder scope on top for?


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 06, 2011 | National Geographic 76AZ (525 x 76mm)...

1 Answer

I have a Criterion 4000 that is set up for photography only. I have the scope, focus adapter tube, and the t ring adapter. This is only mounted on a photo tripod. What parts do I need for casual star...


You will need a diagonal, eyepiece and a finder scope. The photo tripod is not the greatest for astronomy. Acceptable for the moon and quick views of the planets but with a SCTs narrow view, you will be constantly adjusting the tripod.
I would start with a 25mm plossl eyepiece which would provide 80x power. About as high as you can get with a photo tripod.
Places to get finder scopes, eyepieces and diagonals
http://www.agenaastro.com/

http://www.telescope.com/control/category/~category_id=telescopes?atc=ggldlp&gclid=CNC2_eT8oqUCFUHsKgodywuvHA

Be aware that the Bausch and Lomb telescopes had terrible reputation for bad optics.

Nov 14, 2010 | Bausch and Lomb Optics

3 Answers

Why do the stars look like little lights? I kinda


The individual stars are not much fun to look at...it is the planets and nebulas that are. I have an 8 inch SCT with a computer guidence system and have looked at Saturn and Jupiter from my front yard and could see them very well. I live in the city so light pollution will not allow me to see any nebulas. I have to travel outside of the city into the mountains to be able to see things. The spectacular pictures that you see being made by people with telescopes cannot usually be seen by the naked eye through the telescope. They are made using special filters, lenses, and a camera connected to the scope. And then they will have very long exposure times(sometimes 15 hours) to gather enough of light coming from space and taking hundreds of images. Then all these images are stacked on each other and modified using software on a computer to create the images. So again the stars are not much to look at... it is the planets and nebulas that are cool. With my telescope I can see Saturn's rings and moons. I can see Jupiter's big red spot...very cool. You will need to start with a small powered lens to locate the planet you want to look at to center of eyepiece. Then work your way up in magnifiaction by changing the eyepiece and then focusing the inmage in. The eyepiece can make or break your telescope experience and most telescopes come with very limited eyepieces that are cheap and not well made. I have purchased a good set of eyepieces and they make a huge difference. If you can afford it look for a 100 degree eyepiece. They are expensive but are worth it when you look into one. Also it is very important to get your scope's collimation adjusted correctly for the best image. And get yourself a set of color filters. The filters can bring out images that you cannot see without.

Dec 20, 2009 | Meade DS-2114 ATS (325 x 114mm) Telescope

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