Question about Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I have a 220v 100 amp circuit breaker that feeds a sub-panel. The sub-panel has 3 circuits: a)60 amp Heater (unit 1 in house) b)60 amp A/C (unit 2 in house) c) 40 amp for pool equipment. The 100 amp keeps tripping in the middle of day. None of the circuits in the sub panel trip. Because it is summer, I am assuming the Heater circuit does not come into play.

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that gotĀ 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 20 times.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

  • Expert
  • 86 Answers

Your a/c uses the blower motor from the heater to distribute air check for loose wire connections that will raise amperage and also make sure you have the right size wire to each unit 40 amp should have 8 awg(copper) wire and 60 shouldbe 6 awg i think if the wire is to small=heat= higher amperage

Posted on Jul 14, 2009

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

5000 watt inverter schematics circuit


If you have (90) 50w lamps = 4500 watts total. Assuming a 120/240 panel, if you put 1/2 on one "side" of the panel and the other 1/2 on the other "side" of the panel, that would be 2250 watts on each half. The generator should be rated *at least* 125% of the load; 4500w x 1.25 = 5625W. Using a 4500W generator on this load will cause it to overheat and shorten its life as it is running at 100% of capacity all the time..

One half of the panel is 120V to neutral, and the other is 120V to neutral - or 240V between both circuit breaker terminals. Ohms law for DC circuits and purely resistive AC circuits says Volts x Amps = Watts; or Watts / Volts = Amps. So, 2250W / 120V = 18.75A on each pole of a 2 pole circuit breaker that feeds the sub panel. A #12 copper wire is rated for 20 amps; but as per National Electrical Code - must be de-rated to 80% of rating which means it is good up to 16 amps maximum. A #10 copper wire is rated for 30 amps, but it too must be derated to 80%, making it good for 24 amps maximum. So, if you are going to feed a sub panel supplying (90) 50watt lamps, you will need to run a #10/3 copper cable from a two pole 30 amp circuit breaker at the generator to a 120/240 volt "main lug only" sub panel rated for at least 30 amps.

Divide your load evenly across the sub panel - (4) 15 amps circuits via (2) two pole 15 amp circuit breakers on each "side" of the panel if you run (2) 14/3 cables out to the lights - or (4) single pole 15 amp circuit breakers if you run (4) 14/2 cables out to the lights. No circuit breaker terminal should have more than 23 lamps that means you have (2) w/ 22 lamps and (2) with 23 lamps. The circuit w/ 23 lamps will draw 23 lamps x 50w = 1150W. 1150W / 120V = 9.6A. The 22 lamp load will be 22 x 50w = 1100W. 110W / 120V = 9.2A. Which is well within the 12A maximum allowed (after derating as required by code) by a #14 copper wire rated for 15A.

Good luck!

Mar 10, 2014 | Electrical Supplies

1 Answer

Need information on circuit breaker BR2100 60amp


Hi - I'm an electrician and can help you with your question.

A BR2100 circuit breaker is a 2 Pole 100 Amp (for the part number "BR2100", the "2" indicates the number of poles and the "100" indicates the amperage) circuit breaker. It can be installed in a single phase or three phase 120/240 VAC system panel that specifically lists the BR series breakers as acceptable for use.

A BR260 A BR2100 circuit breaker is a 2 Pole 60 Amp (the part number BR260, the "2" indicates the number of poles and the "60" indicates the amperage) circuit breaker. It can be installed in a single phase or three phase 120/240 VAC system panel that specifically lists the BR series breakers as acceptable for use.

It is not possible to have a BR2100 rated for 60 amps, 1 or 3 poles, or a BR260 rated for 100 amps, 1 or 3 poles.

It is not permissible to install any circuit breaker brand or type in any panel that does not specifically include it on a list of acceptable circuit breakers.

Circuit breakers are designed to carry 80% of the amperage rating.
To determine the load a circuit breaker can carry, multiply the circuit breaker amp rating by 80%.
This means that if you need to supply more than 80 amps, you cannot use a 100 amp circuit breaker. A higher rating is required. A BR2110 would be acceptable for loads greater than 80 amps, but less than 88 amps because the formula above says: 110 amp x 80% = 88 amps.

To determine the breaker size, determine the load (by measuring with a meter or obtaining amp rating of the load from the data plate) and multiply it by 125%. Using the same numbers in the example above; assume an 88 amp load. 88 amps x 125% = 110 amp circuit breaker. The 60 amp breaker is acceptable for up to 48 amps because 60amps x 80% = 48 amps. A 48 amp load needs a 60 amp breaker because 48 amps x 125% = 60 amps.

I hope this helps and good luck!

Jan 15, 2013 | Eaton Corporation BR2100 Circuit Breaker

1 Answer

A 60 Amp breaker (three phase) powers an 125 amp main lug 3 phase panel is that k or do i need a bigger braker. the wires are #8 THHN.


The breaker that feeds the panel and the wire are what determines the rating. The panel has to be at least as high as the breaker. It can be more, and no problem.The problem I see is that the wiring is undersized for the 60 amp breaker. You should have #6 wires or change the breaker to a 50 amp. If that is not enough for your load, you must change the wiring. It also depends on the type of wire. THHN will have the largest amperage, but if it is TW, it will be lower. Rule of thumb would be #10-30 amp, #8-40-50 amp, #6-50-60 amp, #4-70-90 amp and #2-95-135 amp. There are other factors, such as derating etc. but if you wanted to increase to 100 amp, I would run #2 thhn. Hope this helps.

Mar 05, 2011 | Siemens Murray 125 Amp Circuit Breaker...

1 Answer

1 question can Cutler Hammer breakers have the amperage feed through the breakers. To the breaker box and from the box grid to the load. Does it matter which way the amperage is fed through the breaker?...


There seem to be several questions mingled in with those 2 questions.

1) Amps can go either way

2) Breakers trip when heat exceeds certain level. Heat is caused by amps.

3) You want to add a subpanel in garage.
I do not know the code in your area for installing a subpanel.
Your plan will work by connecting 6 gauge wire to main breaker, and new 60 amp breaker will protect wires between main box and subpanel.
Remember, wires going into main breaker cannot be turned off without pulling meter.
Some areas require license to pull meter.
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-replace-circuit-breaker.html

4) To work around license and meter-pull, simply replace a 240V breaker in main panel with your new 60 amp breaker.
Then move breakers around to match new set-up.
New subpanel can accommodate two new 240V breakers and one new 120 Breaker
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-install-a-subpanel.html

5) 6 gauge wire is correct for 60 amp breaker.

6) I'm not sure what you mean by the box rails?

7) Do you need more amperage on main service?
This means adding a larger service panel with 150 Watt or 200 Watt main breaker.
Some areas require service upgrade when remodeling or adding circuits.

8) How to figure total amp draw at your house.
Add up total watts being used.
For example you have 1/2 Hp motor
754 watts per Hp
1/2 Hp = 377Watts
Volts x Amps = Watts
Amps = Watts divided by Volts.
377 Watts divided by 240Volts = 1.57 amps (plus a bit more amperage when motor starts)
40 watt light bulb divided by 120Volts = .33 amps
Double oven has label located inside door that shows upper and lower wattage.
Dishwasher, dryer, big screen TV, satellite receiver all have labels that show wattage.
Water heater has label that shows wattage of each element.
http://waterheatertimer.org/Figure-Volts-Amps-Watts-for-water-heater.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/See-inside-main-breaker-box.html

Add a comment for more help

Feb 18, 2011 | Cutler Hammer 100 Amp Main Breaker...

2 Answers

I have a trailer house that has a 100 amp breaker box in it. I has gas for heat, water heater and stove. I am changing them to electric. Will I need to change the panel put to a 200 amp.


Its probably not a bad idea. Thats alot for a 100A panel to handle, a range needs a 50A, a water heater needs 30A, and the heat will need a 50A or a 60A breaker... Plus whatever else is in the house will be a bit more than the 100A service can handle. But if you don't have the money it will do for a while because for the most part they won't all be pulling at the same time. Word to the wise get at least a 30 space panel when you upgrade, I always install a 40 space panel because for the cost difference its well worth it for future needs because you'll fill it up quicker than you think and you'll have space for anything else you may want to add later on. Hope I helped

Dec 09, 2010 | Your One Source Homeline Circuit Breaker

2 Answers

How do I run from a 100 amp main panel to a 60 amp subpanel, 125 from my house to the garage


See 60 Amp sub-panel image

Above image shows drawing of 60Amp sub-panel located next to main panel. Drawing shows #6 wire... 125' distance to garage calls for #4 wire. I ran #4 to my barn and have no problems.

Give thought to how many new breakers you want at garage.
See photo of subpanel that holds three 240V breakers

Using drawing as a guide. Replace existing 240Volt breaker with new 60 Amp breaker. Two hot wires connect to new 60 Amp breaker. Neutral connects to neutral busbar.

More space: You can free up space in main breaker box using a tandem breaker. Or by doubling up 2 lightly used 120V circuits onto one breaker. Do not double-up on 240 Breakers

Conduit: You want PVC conduit large enough to fit three #4 wires. Bigger conduit is easier to pull wires ... and maybe later ethernet wire, or alarm wire etc.

Ground wire: You can put a ground rod at garage and run #6 bare copper between sub-panel neutral-busbar and ground rod. Attach ground wire firmly with grounding clamp.

I want you to check with local electrical supply for exact code in your area concerning conduit requirements, grounding, and wire size. Tighten all lugs very tight against wire.

Oct 03, 2010 | Siemens 100 Amp Main Breaker Renovation...

1 Answer

I am installing a sub panel in a detached building from my house. Which is 100 ft away. I plan to have four separate circuits. One that will service a ceiling fan and 3 for plug ins that will only run a TV...


You could use 6/3 with ground. You must take an equipment ground conductor along with your current carrying conductors. Still drive a ground rod at the building, and add a seperate ground bar in the sub panel. Connect your equipment grounding conductor from main building along with the equipment grouding conductor to the ground rod. Do not bond the neutral in the sub panel to ground. Be aware you will still have some voltage drop, so a 220V air conditioner might be better.

Sep 10, 2010 | General Electric GE ELECTRICAL TQD22200X2...

1 Answer

Hooking up a Hot tub


Everything above tells me this is 120V unit...if thats the case a single pole breaker is sufficient. Also by what you have written, a 15 amp breaker should suffice.

Jun 22, 2009 | Spa Parts Plus GFCI, Circuit Breaker, 30...

1 Answer

I need to install a GFI breaker on a Baptistry.


You could install a standard GFCI in line at each component ( heater, pump & timer) or you could install AFCI breakers similar to what are required in many residential codes (provide the same protection at the panel not at the location... http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/afcifac8.PDF

The AFCI breakers will need to match your panel type (siemens, GE or Square-D) and the amperage/configuration.

I would install them at the lowest level (closest to the components) in the system to reduce possibility of fire in the wiring between the components and the afci breaker.

Jan 04, 2009 | Electrical Supplies

1 Answer

3 combination arc fault breakers tripping under load


What is happening is the white wire that comes off the breaker is probably too close to another neutral or too close to a hot wire that is on one of the other circuits that will make it trip when you use a drill etc... Check to see if the coiled up white wire off of the breaker is not near a hot in the panel. I have had lots of arc fault breakers trip for that reason.

Nov 25, 2008 | Siemens 20Amp 1-pole arc-fault circuit...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Heating & Cooling Logo

Related Topics:

88 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Heating & Cooling Experts

paulcarew

Level 3 Expert

2463 Answers

Dan Webster
Dan Webster

Level 3 Expert

8220 Answers

Donni Steen

Level 3 Expert

659 Answers

Are you a Heating and Cooling Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...