Question about Leupold RX-III Rangefinder

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8x magnification can you use the rx111 as binoculars to look out and scan for anything out in feild and then range it? is it like looking at items and the area your in with a binoculars but with 8x power and with the added range finding?

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The RX series of range finders are not of the optic quality that other Leupold optics are. I have used my RX IV in place of my binoculars, but it is not adequate for glassing for game full time. The rangefinding abilities left a lot to be desired for me. As long a the object was under 450 yards, it worked fine. Past that was somewhat difficult to get a range at times. Hope this helps.

Posted on Nov 24, 2007

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How do I select a monocular lens?


Having a monocular is a great alternative other than carrying a pair of binoculars. They are significantly more compact, lightweight and portable but they come with only the half of the size of binoculars. The following article talks about how to Select the best monocular lens between your budget and needs.
Need to consider the points below:
  • Monocular vs. Spotting Scope
    A monocular significantly featured a compact and portable design. Monocular lenses that are bigger generally have more power, larger lenses and wider views are known as spotting scopes. A spotting scope will be notably greater and heavier than a typical monocular which are frequently used for bird watching, hunting, or spotting subjects from a static position. In case require better performance, and you are compatible with the size or weight, then you have the hardly better option than a spotting scope
  • Good Monocular Power
    The power or magnification are the things that you should consider first when choosing a monocular lens. This device typically has a higher magnification of 6x to 10x which will allow you to see further and in more detail. The monocular with 9x or 10x magnification will usually slightly high priced more than 6x or 8x ones. The good thing is, about this device, that you can get the same power of binoculars, but they are only half of the size of their counterpart.
  • Right Lens Size
    If you look at the specifications of a monocular, you will find two numbers. For instance, 8×25; which means 8x, the first number, denotes its power, and 25mm, the second number, represents the size of its lens.

    A monocular comprises with a lens of 20mm to 42mm. With a bigger monocular lens, you can observe see a wider view, and will also result in a better, sharper image while looking through the device. The downside is that the larger the size of the lens is, the heavier and bigger the device will be.
  • Monocular Size and Weight
    On the whole, an 8×25 or 10×25 monocular is considered to be a pocket-size or compact device which will simply be fit in your pocket. They usually come with a small carrying bag. The pocket monocular works as a cool device. They are very portable as it is easy to carry them around everywhere - keeping in the car or in the pocket when climbing. These devices are low-priced and can also serve well.

    You will have to keep it in your mind that an 8×25 or 10×25 pocket monocular is very small, so you cannot expect too much performance from it! These tiny monocular have a small lens but can provide a very limited view though they have good power. At first, you will need to detect your subject and later use the monocular in a "point and shoot" style. It is not at all easy to use them since they have a small eyecup. If you want to enjoy a wider, sharper and brighter image, then you should always opt for a 30mm to 42mm monocular.
  • Night Vision Monocular
    If you are planning on buying a monocular in order to use at night or whole darkness, then you should go for a night vision monocular. IR illuminator is built-in these devices which will increase your night vision capability. Having less magnification, you can use them normally to get a better image and off course less fuzzy. These monocular usually come in different sizes, magnification and price range.
This guide helps you to choose a monocular lens that you are looking for.

Mar 19, 2018 | Optics

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I hav an astronomical telescope D=60mm f=800mm complete w box and instruction manual the box says KD bright and sharper image . and it has a ward art number 48-20398M. the box and book look to b really old...


Yes you can see the 5 bright planets WITHOUT a telescope. However remember that it is only a 60mm lens-- a standard pair of binoculars is 50mm. The scope will give you about 100 power magnification maximum.

Jun 18, 2011 | Optics

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I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go


thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
Everything you need to know to become an expert:
on this website: http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm
It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

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When I look through the len I don't see anything


What eyepiece do you have installed and how far away is the item you are trying to look at. It is possible that you have too much magnification for the item you are trying to view.

Mar 15, 2011 | Konusmotor 500 (230 x 114mm) Telescope

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What do the numbers 10-30X60 mean?


The numbers on binoculars in the form 00x00 are the power and the diameter of the objective (the main lens). A common one is 8x30, for small binoculars of 8 power and an objective 30mm in diameter.

10-30x60 is a bit more complicated. The diameter of the objective is 60mm, but the first numbers with the hyphen indicate a range of powers, from 10 to 30, because these binoculars have a zoom feature, giving variable power.

In my view, zoom on boinoculars is a gimmick. It isn't useful in practice, usually giving too much magnification to be useful at the high power end, and the complication it adds to the optics means that the image is not as good as with simpler binoculars of similar quality.

Dec 10, 2010 | Barska Optics 10-30x60 Gladiator Zoom

1 Answer

I am trying to find out what is 6x20


Binoculars are often refered to as "N x NN" which typically refers to the magnification and the size in millimeters of the front lenses (called the "objective" lenses). 6x20 refers to 20mm front lenses (about 3/4 inch) with 6x magnification. These would be useful as opera glasses, or for spotting birds in a small backyard.

The "N x NN" designation doesn't say anything about the quality of the binoculars - just the physical size and magnification.

Oct 06, 2009 | HiStar 6x20 Sportbinox

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Is my bushnell insta vision 7x35 or 10x50- how do I tell ?


The first number is the magnification the second number is the size in millimeters of the objective (large lens) So if you measure the diameter of the front large lens that will give you the size. So a 10x50 means a magnifyng power of 10 and an objective of 50mm.
Now to find out the magnification if you don't know what it is. Measure the front lens. Then if you look through the eyepiece lens while holding it away from you you will see that there is in each a small circle of light. That it what is known as the exit pupil. It lines up with the pupil of your eyes when you have the binoculars pressed up against your eyes. Now measure the diameter of the exit pupil in millimeters. It will only be a small number.

To work out the magnification use this formula. Magnification = Objective size divided by the exit pupil.
So a 10x50 will look like this M = 50 divided by 5....therefore M =10 which is the magnification.

Both the 7x35 and 10x50 will have an exit pupil of 5mm. So if yours is one of these then all you need is the objective (large) lens size.

Aug 04, 2009 | Bushnell InstaVision Binocular Binocular

1 Answer

Can not seem to focus when we look through the lens we just see the bk=lack sky we cannot seem to see anything


try this:
see the mini scope on top of the telescope?--that's called the finder scope--
you look through that to see what the telescope is aimed at, just like what a sniper does before he pulls the trigger.

put in the lowest power eyepiece you have in the telescope, the one with a high number on it.

it's a good idea to align the 'finder' with the telescope during the day time--it's much easier.

if your telescope and finder scope aren't aligned properly, aiming your telescope at any target will be off and you'll just get frustrated.
to do this, look through your finder scope and pick a far away target, put in the lowest power eyepiece you have, that's the one with a high number--
high number = low power = a nice big view in the telescope.
low number on eyepiece = high magnification, like a zoom lens.

always use the lowest eyepiece first, then work your way to higher magnification, if you want to get a closer look at your target.

use lowest power eyepiece in telescope--> look through finder scope -->focus the image--> switch to higher power of eyepiece for a closer look at your target.

practice this during the day until you're comfortable, then try it at night.
try the moon, it's a nice big target

you can also use binoculars to check out the night sky.
you can try using 7x35 or 7x50 binoculars.
you see a lot more stars and it gives nice big views of the stars and constellations...and the moon...

hope this helps :D


Jul 30, 2009 | Bushnell Deep Space 78-9512 (120 x 60mm)...

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Poor quality


My response to these always makes me sad. There is no way of getting good picture. These camera binoculars are neither good cameras or binoculars. They do neither well. The camera is just attached to the binoculars. What you see through the binoculars is not what the camera sees. The binoculars magnification is not the same as the lens in the camera. It is like holding a camera on top of a pair of binoculars. The camera will take a picture in the area approximate to where you are looking. Digital cameras have a sensor. The more megapixels the larger the sensor should be. Camera makers are now making compact cameras with huge megapixel capacity without increasing the sensor size. The result is worse looking pictures. Not much is different with the cameras attached to binoculars only the sensors are much worse quality than those on a stand alone digital camera.
Maybe not the solution you wanted buts its the truth. If you do want to take bird photos your best bet is a pair of binoculars on a tripod with a digital camera adaptor and camera attached. The camera adaptors that are made in China are not expensive and are copies of some of the high priced units out there. all the adaptor is is a bracket which attaches to a tripod which holds the camera to one of the binocular lenses. That way you see what the camera sees through the binoculars.

Dec 30, 2008 | Vivitar MAGNACAM Binocular

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