Question about Bose Lifestyle 12 System

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Subwoofer volume raises and lowers ...sounds like some sort of short in the voice coil. limited knowledge in this and haven't yet figured out how to open the cabinet on this Lifestyle 12.

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Hiya, sounds like it could be dry joints (bad solder), loose connections or maybe the pot is dirty. I would suggest someone with experience with a soldering iron though as mistakes can produce a big bang!

If the speaker is really sounding scratchy then could be the coil, but still prefer the dry joints...

Best of luck

Posted on Jul 14, 2009

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1 Answer

PA speakers distort even at low volume


Firstly check if you R getting clipping at the input ,if U have it, then lower the vol of the music source andif their is no clipping at the source then U must have you speakers checked for it may have some voice coils burnt .with best wishes .system tech.

Apr 13, 2014 | Yamaha S215V Main / Stereo Speaker

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One of my Bose 601 speakers has developed a mid freq buzzing at volume. Ant ideas?


Yep, if it is a scratchy sort of sound, the units coil has overheated, the voice coils insulation has bubbled and expanded, and is now rubbing against the magnet as it moves. Only fix is to replace the driver. U can confirm by moving the inner circle of the cone in and out of the magnet. Should not rub and be perfectly centered around the magnet.

A vibration sort of sound can be caused by loose screws holding down the driver. But that is usually the case on your large heavy drivers with large excursions, not a mid range speaker.

Mar 15, 2014 | Bose 601 Main / Stereo Speaker

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HOW DO YOU FIX A COIL IN A SUBWOOFER


if its truly a bad, burned up voice coil, its generally not worth replacing unless its a competition sub. you can get good sounding subs for under $100.

Jan 16, 2013 | Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

I think its my voice coil but I might as well ask to make sure. At higher volumes, my W7 will make a wierd rattling sound from inside the sub. Is it the voice coil or something else?


tinsel lead on terminal needs to be coated with a layer of black rtv sealant where it comes out of voice coil on back of speaker temporary fix since you have OVERPLAYED your subs,

Feb 22, 2011 | Jl Audio 10W7 Car Subwoofer

1 Answer

I have a subwoofer in my truck. 2 speakers in a box with an amp. One of the subs blew to a song that just came on. the volume was high. Sounds distorted. Any way to fix?


Sounds like the voice coil of that woofer overheated and melted while it was turned up too far. Now that area rubs on the magnet or pole piece internally and makes noise.

No you generally can't fix that except for a few high end woofer brands that have field replaceable voice coils that you can buy. Most subwoofers physically bottom out and sounds really bad before experiencing thermal damage like that. Sounding bad is a warning sign that it's being overloaded.

Note that woofers have 2 different types of overload conditions that can cause damage.
1. Over excursion from deep bass that moves the woofer cone too far and damages the suspension. This is clearly audible. Proper box design and user knowledge will prevent this.

2. Thermal limit. This is the published power rating that the voice coil can absorb without damage. Things can melt or fail entirely if this is exceeded.

Either of those issues can cause the noise you are hearing. Without a more detailed description of what happened or how it sounds before, during and after this is much detail as I can provide. But.. move the woofer some by hand, do it evenly pushing straight down evenly on both sides, not too far, go about half way through it's normal movement. If it clearly rubs and makes noise internally then the voice coil is damaged or if has some debris stuck in there. Most woofer are not serviceable.

There are many other factors that affect the longevity of the woofer, such as
  • Ambient temperature too high
  • Limited air flow has inadequate woofer cooling
  • UV exposure can make the surround material brittle
  • Proper enclosure design is needed to acoustically and physically supports the woofer to prevent bottoming out, particularly at the system resonant frequency.
  • Amplifier distortion can kill speakers even when rated far below the woofers max wattage.


Nov 28, 2010 | Sony XS-AW200 Car Subwoofer

1 Answer

My subwoofer keeps making a clunking noise...How do I correct this problem?


The clunking noise could be the voice coil maxing out hitting its stop or a warped voice coil. How much power is going to the subwoofer. If it only happens when the high volume setting it and not at medium volume the subwoofer may not be able to handle the power. With your hand gently push the speaker cone back and release the cone so it can return to its rest state several times. Do you hear a scratching sound or feel any resistance? If you do your voice coil is damaged if not from physical means it could be from the voice coil overheating. If it is OK shake and rap on the subwoofer box and try to identify any loose parts which could be making noise.

Aug 13, 2010 | Denon Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Stereo cutting off when volume is over 29


Twenty nine sounds pretty loud to me. A shorted voice coil in any one of your speakers will drop its resistance value so if the amplifier thinks its feeding a short circuit, will "protect" itself by shutting off. Check wiring carefully and each speaker at a little lower volume for sounds of distortion ie: shorted voice coils...

Jun 27, 2009 | Kenwood Marine Receivr/Speaker CD/MP3/WMA...

1 Answer

Subwoofers pop then immediately produce no sound


Sounds like the two subs wired together might be too much of a load on the amp and it is shutting off. Try wiring the two subs in series. That will reduce the load on the amp but will conversely put out less power. Less is better than none though. In any case check your amp to see what the lowest ohm rating it can see, that ohm rating is where you want your subs and if faced with a choice of either going under (lower numerically) or over (higher numerically) GO OVER!-it is much safer.
Here's an article I wrote that can help explain how to wire the subs to the amp.

OHM LOADS, SUB WIRING, OHM RELATED POWER OUTPUT

SERIES SUBWOOFER WIRING
Wire the positive pole from one voice coil (using wire that is as thick or thicker than your wire from amp to sub) to the negative pole of the other voice coil (on the same sub). This will leave you with a positive pole from one voice coil and a negative pole from the other giving you the two leads that will be hooked up to the amplifier or other subs. When wiring in series, the ohms will go up numerically, and the load on the amp will go down. Almost all amplifiers power output will follow this rule, except some amps such as JL Audio's “Ohm matching” D Class amps.

PARALLEL SUBWOOFER WIRING
Wire the positive pole from one voice coil (using wire that is as thick or thicker than your wire from amp to sub) to the positive pole of the other voice coil (on the same sub). Then wire the negative to the negative in the same way. You can then wire to the amp or other subs. When wiring in parallel the ohms will go down numerically, and the load on the amp will go up. Almost all amplifiers power output will follow this rule, except some amps such as JL Audio's “Ohm matching” D Class amps.

MULTIPLE SUBS USING SERIES AND PARALLEL WIRING
In order to match your amplifiers ohm rating you can use parallel and series wiring together, just keep things even for power distribution and to avoid phase issues.
Example: I have two “Type X 12” subs” that have dual 2ohm voice coils and have to match my “Amplifier X” ohm rating of 2ohms mono. In this case, I would wire each subwoofer in series (giving me a 4ohm load), and then wire the two subs in parallel to get my 2ohm mono load. When wiring multiple subs just, treat each sub as a voice coil and wire accordingly.

POWER OUTPUT AND OHM LOADS
For example if “Amplifier X” can make 100watts@8ohms, it would make 200watts@4ohms and 400watts@2ohms. However with every drop in ohms the amplifier is put under more pressure. It starts to create a lot of heat, distortion figures begin to climb, damping rates drop, and some amps even throw power spikes when clipping. SO BE SURE TO CHECK YOUR AMPS RATING AND DO NOT EXCEED IT!

-Dynami

Apr 04, 2009 | Alpine Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

Raised volume cuts sound and gives me "overload" message


A couple of possibilities: Bad solder on power regulators (attached to main heat sink) or cooling fan may not be turning on when volume is raised.

Jan 16, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Sound problem


You have a shorted speaker or a speaker with a bad voice coil. This has been confirmed by the fact that the audio amplifier is shutting down (protection) but the unit stays powered on. The speakers will play for a few seconds or maybe even longer at lower volume, but any length or time or an increase in volume will immediateley shut off sound. This is due to the fact that a shorted speaker wire/connection will ground out or short to one another. If you have checked all connections behind the radio AND at the speakers and found no problems, then it is a voice coil on the speaker. A shorted voice coil will work until the speaker cone moves causing the short or until enough power passes through the voice coil's short to turn off the radio.
Solution:
1. You can use a voltmeter set to check continuity to test for a speaker short. Disconnect all speakers from the radio and connect one side of your meter to ground and the other to the speaker lead. An audible "beep" will confirm a short.
2. The other method would be to disconnect all speakers and re-connect them one by one until the radio's sound output shuts off again. This will be your shorted speaker.
I hope this information was helpful.

Apr 07, 2008 | Pioneer DEH-1800 CD Player

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